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Camp kitchen in a milk crate


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Grate, carriage bolts, nuts & washers

33xkfo5.jpg

Beats the hell out of a 2 burner Coleman camp stove.

The little duel fuel backpacker stoves burn hot.

Grate fits over the top of a heavy duty plastic milk crate.

Grate serves as a lid and stoves, pot, pans & utensils go in the milk crate.

Camp kitchen in a milk crate.

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Good idea and the most important part is that coffee pot, forgot mine once :barnie:

LOL..... been there, done that. :arrowheadsmiley:

These little back packer duel fuel stoves will have coffee perking in 3 minutes.

Also makes a good tent heater.

Fill a #10 tin can with heavy dry black sand, set it on top the stove, on low.

It heats the can + contents and radiates a lot of heat all night.

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WoW, Your a Up Stacker. (Folks that live Up Wind from the Smelter) I just have a Single Burner and old grate I put between two rocks! LOL

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OMG no coffee would send me back to the store as old body absolutely refuses to go to work without at least 2 cups a joe to make it go. I like my old gas coleman stove as had the relic over 35 years and never gave me a minutes trouble-John

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Coffee ... did someone say COFFEE ... I smell COFFEE! Coffee, Coffee, Coffee ... I love coffee ... i make my own but forgot my pot!!! :)

Mike F

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Love that old hammered look aluminum.... I use that pattern all the time in my jewelry!

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Two things I don't go without.....a hip-stick and coffee pot.....

One gets me started and the other keeps me going......

Anyboyd know where to buy one of those 12 volt coffee warmers that hangs over the side of your cup?

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Power of suggestion is strong .....had to go out to the P/U and get my camera......then got my propane bottle....

found my little stove in my camping trunk.....hooked up the camera to the computer......got a cup of coffee....sip....sip....

Walla....a Brazilian camping stove....sip...sip....

post-300-0-71174400-1345229269_thumb.jpg

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Two things I don't go without.....a hip-stick and coffee pot.....

One gets me started and the other keeps me going......

Anyboyd know where to buy one of those 12 volt coffee warmers that hangs over the side of your cup?

The Chines save the Day. Harbor Freight had them.

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I sometimes go on 3 week or month long prospecting trips in extremely isolated rugged 4wdl & chainsaw accessible terrain. I also like to eat well. As we all know, an ice chest will only last so long. Plus, they are heavy, bulky & take up considerable space. Camping cooking is not home cooking. But, you can almost have as good as home cooking at camp, if you want to prepare a few things in advance.

I have a couple large pressure cookers (All American 925 & 941). I can various boneless meats (beef, pork, chicken, turkey, bacon, sausage, etc) in quart mason jars. I also can thick meaty spaghetti sauce, stews, chili, etc. 12 or 24 quarts of any of that is a base for many hearty healthy camp meals. One hell of a lot better than most canned goods you can buy. The only issue is the glass jars. But, if carefully packed in produce boxes, with cardboard dividers between the jars, they are not an issue. I have never broken a jar in transit yet.

I also have a large commercial grade dehydrator. So I dehydrate cubed, sliced, shredded potatoes, cabbage, onions, bell peppers, etc. All of which last months, if not years vacuum bagged & re-hydrate well. Plus, I usually take fresh potatoes, cabbage, onions, etc. Because they keep fairly well. Plus canned goods, canned ham, instant potatoes, dry gravy mix, assorted pasta, rice, dry pancake, biscuit mix, powdered milk & eggs, etc. It’s a learning curve to get baking biscuits or corn bread down pat in a cast iron Dutch over in campfire coals. But, once you know how, nothing is better with honey, jam or jelly, with a meal.

For emergency backpacking, snowshoeing or harsh survival rations, many have never even heard of Pemmican. MRE from way back when. Beats Jerky all to hell. You can spice it to suit your tastes with a little smoke seasoning, chipotle powder or whatever you prefer. Plus add dried nuts, raisins, berries and/or fruit of all sorts. I supplement what I make with multi-vitamin powder. It doesn’t take a wizard to prepare & make it either. Stores for years in food saver type vacuum sealed bags cut down to any size you prefer.

Pemmican links below

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pemmican

http://www.wildernesscollege.com/pemmican-recipes.html

http://www.traditionaltx.us/images/PEMMICAN.pdf

Link below how to dehydrate shredded, sliced or diced potatoes.

http://tpass.org/for...php?topic=892.0

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Hey Bill, I'd be glad to trade a steamin' hot cup o' joe for your first nugget find of the hunt. Deal?

Hmmmmm if you are asking me Ed I would have made that trade the trip I had no coffee :tisk-tisk:

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I sometimes go on 3 week or month long prospecting trips in extremely isolated rugged 4wdl & chainsaw accessible terrain. I also like to eat well. As we all know, an ice chest will only last so long. Plus, they are heavy, bulky & take up considerable space. Camping cooking is not home cooking. But, you can almost have as good as home cooking at camp, if you want to prepare a few things in advance.

I have a couple large pressure cookers (All American 925 & 941). I can various boneless meats (beef, pork, chicken, turkey, bacon, sausage, etc) in quart mason jars. I also can thick meaty spaghetti sauce, stews, chili, etc. 12 or 24 quarts of any of that is a base for many hearty healthy camp meals. One hell of a lot better than most canned goods you can buy. The only issue is the glass jars. But, if carefully packed in produce boxes, with cardboard dividers between the jars, they are not an issue. I have never broken a jar in transit yet.

I also have a large commercial grade dehydrator. So I dehydrate cubed, sliced, shredded potatoes, cabbage, onions, bell peppers, etc. All of which last months, if not years vacuum bagged & re-hydrate well. Plus, I usually take fresh potatoes, cabbage, onions, etc. Because they keep fairly well. Plus canned goods, canned ham, instant potatoes, dry gravy mix, assorted pasta, rice, dry pancake, biscuit mix, powdered milk & eggs, etc. It’s a learning curve to get baking biscuits or corn bread down pat in a cast iron Dutch over in campfire coals. But, once you know how, nothing is better with honey, jam or jelly, with a meal.

For emergency backpacking, snowshoeing or harsh survival rations, many have never even heard of Pemmican. MRE from way back when. Beats Jerky all to hell. You can spice it to suit your tastes with a little smoke seasoning, chipotle powder or whatever you prefer. Plus add dried nuts, raisins, berries and/or fruit of all sorts. I supplement what I make with multi-vitamin powder. It doesn’t take a wizard to prepare & make it either. Stores for years in food saver type vacuum sealed bags cut down to any size you prefer.

Pemmican links below

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pemmican

http://www.wildernesscollege.com/pemmican-recipes.html

http://www.traditionaltx.us/images/PEMMICAN.pdf

Link below how to dehydrate shredded, sliced or diced potatoes.

http://tpass.org/for...php?topic=892.0

A good read EM....thanks for the post.....the butcher shops here have quite a large wood structure covered in

cheese cloth and then the meat is hung inside to slowly air dry.....many of the prospectors here buy this meat

before it is completely cured.....then when they make camp they hang the meat on tree limbs and let nature

take it's course....

Several times when camped in the AU outback and also here in Brazil on the river bank while dredging I have

had to scrape the maggots out of the meat before adding it to the pressure pot of beans.....or in smaller bits

to the pan of rice.....

My nine year old grand-son is visiting here this weekend and he's now waiting at his other grand-mothers house

for me to bring him some jerky.....he'll be a happy camper in about another hour.....

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Man I love that cooker!

Replace the Weight with about 6ft of copper line going into some ice.

I should be about to get about a quart of shine every 5 minutes. LOL

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Great minds must think alike.

:thumbsupanim

I made a copper coil still conversion kit for it, years ago.

With fittings, position a gravity flow spiral coil in one side & out the low side in an upright freezer.

A spiral coil is easy to make, simply bend the copper tubing tight around a broom stick handle.

That way you don't have to fool with ice.

Someone I know makes a couple gallon batch of 100 proof shine or (knock your socks off) Grand Marnier every so often.

Right time of the year over in CA, you can buy a full PU truck load of oranges (seconds or cull) real cheap.

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