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Fossil Impression of Seed Pod? Ideas?...


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I was attracted to this small rock because of its mix of light and dark colors; like white and dark chocolate to be honest. I kept it for that alone. I stuck in in my pocket and kept looking for meteorites. When I got home I set it on the shelf and forgot about it for a few days. Later, I was cleaning some other items and decided to give this a wash and discovered this impression on the plain side. The impression is a few mm's deep, but the detail was great. I got out my loupe and still couldn't make out what had made the impression. I'm posting it to get other thoughts on it. I hope the photo is clear enough, but I'm working on getting a better one.

post-26337-0-64858000-1344110401_thumb.j

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I'll post some pictures of the rock itself. I should have waited until I had a complete set. Your photo is such a close match, I've got believe you're right. The additional photos will be posted soon, i.e. tomorrow.

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That is one very interesting specimen you have there... Cool and will be waiting to see if someone can ID it for you. Have you done a streak test on the host rock yet?

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Hi Bill,

For certain this is not a meteorite. it's a mix of terrestrial material of some kind. I'm sorry I didn't post pictures of the rock itself. Honestly, I was only thinking of the impression. I understand now that the rock itself might be of importance. This will not happen again. My apologies.

Saginaw

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Hi Bill,

For certain this is not a meteorite. it's a mix of terrestrial material of some kind. I'm sorry I didn't post pictures of the rock itself. Honestly, I was only thinking of the impression. I understand now that the rock itself might be of importance. This will not happen again. My apologies.

Saginaw

No need for apologies I am just very curious as to the type of rock the impression is in as it would be a clue as to it's origin and that is why I was wondering about a streak test to determine or help determine what is the rock containing the impression. I was not thinking it may be a meteorite and sorry for any confusion I caused.

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Here are the photos of the stone.These were done quick and dirty so I could post them tonight. I will be posting clearer ones. I hadn't looked at the stone in awhile, and it seems to have lost a little of its original luster or maybe I just remember it as being brighter. I arranged the stone, took the shots and, in review, saw these odd profiles. I didn't plan it, I just shot from different angles. I was amazed that this little rock could hold so many many surprises. I called a photographer friend of mine and described what I was seeing and he asked me to email copies to him. He was tickled too. He recommended that since I was going to post them that I should apply a copyright banner to them. I respect his judgement and did that. So I hope that doesn't affect your viewing of them.

NOTE:The second photo (2c) is not a profile of anything just interesting texture.

post-26337-0-32630200-1344047573_thumb.j post-26337-0-63007500-1344047639_thumb.j post-26337-0-13176200-1344047657_thumb.j post-26337-0-11282100-1344047674_thumb.j post-26337-0-84871500-1344047683_thumb.j post-26337-0-00387100-1344111213_thumb.j

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That is either a petrified belly button OR the imprint of a Levi Strauss button left over from a '49er who got caught in a slow lava flow ... Them's my best guesses but I might be wrong! ... Cheers, Unc

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Wow! And 25a clearly shows teeth inside the mouth. Unreal!

Rim

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:hahaha: You guys, you're killin' me!. You're killin' me with the comments!

Goldfinger, any thoughts about the kind of rock the host is made of? The light part looks like quartz to me, but the dark part, I don't know.. I'm thinking the color is contamination from the surroundings. Maybe it leached into part of stone and left it two colors?

Thanks,

Saginaw

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HomeFire, do you think that's right about the leaching?

Saginaw

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I think Haderly hit the nail on the head when he mentioned desert varnish... See that almost straight line running across the stone. Am guessing the white part was buried and the dark part developed the patina from exposure... :twocents:

Couldn't tell in the original picture but seems pretty obvious in the ensuing ones...

As far as the actual composition, you can do a simple test for limestone,calcite.. Place a few drops of vinegar on the white part of your rock and if it bubbles, it's a carbonate. Don't expect a fast reaction as it may take time to develop...

Steve

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Hi Steve. I'll try the vinger, but will it cause any disfiguring of the piece? I'd rather be uncertain of what the stone is made of than change it in any way. I considered Haderly's desert varnish idea, but forgot to get back to him about it.

Haderly, my apologies.

I know the photos don't really show, but the line of differentiation seems to bleed into the stone. When the light hits it just right you can see color penetrates a little ways. There are also the light spots in the dark side. Photo 2a shows these toward the bottom. Would exposure leave voids like that?

Thanks Steve

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I would not LEACH IT. You only have the Impression the thing made.

It looks cool the way it is.

Look in here and you will see what it was.

http://www.nps.gov/g...nce/fossils.htm

It was aready ID'ed by Steve.

Crinoids

Though plant-like in appearance, crinoids, or sea lilies, were animals, sometimes described as seastars on a stick. They had structures like “roots” that could hold them in place, collect food, circulate fluid, and even act like feet in some species so they could walk across the sea floor. They had a “stem” or column shaped body created by a series of discs stacked together with a central nerve running through. At the top of the body was a cup-like head with feeding structures radiating out from each. These feathery arms had some structural support and could be used in some species for crawling or swimming, though they were primarily used for filtering and capturing food from the water.

In the ancient seas these crinoids were so plentiful they formed "gardens" on the sea floor. Discs, individually or sometimes still stacked together, can be found in all the marine layers at Grand Canyon. These were the hardest parts of the animal and most readily preserved as fossils.

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HomeFire, I don't plan to do anything to the stone. I agree with you on leaving it alone; I don't want to damage it in any way.

I was just wondering about the dark color and how it got there. It looks like the color is either desert varnish or it leached into the stone from the surroundings. I found the stone in a dry wash, by the way.

Thanks

Saginaw

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It will only require a couple drops so the risk of disfiguring will be almost nil... You can wash off after a few minutes when the suspected bubbling stops. (if) Do it on the underside of the rock or someplace that will not show. I really doubt you would notice it anyway.

Steve

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Thanks Steve. I'm going to try it on something else first and see the result. I'm hesitant to apply chems or deface this little guy in any way because from just about any side it offers up something unique.

Saginaw

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With the last pictures I would wager on limestone. The discoloration is either from the absorption of minerals in the ground or desert varnish. I have a crinoid in matrix from New Mexico that looks identical to yours but mine was dug and does not show the darker color. That is the other reason I am leaning toward desert varnish since it was surface collected.

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I agree with you that it's one of the two, but I'm looking into non-destructive ways of determining what the matrix is made of. Steve suggested using a few drops of vinegar on the white part to test for limestone or other carbonate. I going to test another specimen first to see the effects before trying anything on this rock.

Saginaw

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molybdenum stains rock and stone under the right ways. A little bit of Alkali, Acid from the Ground and it Migrates.

I think that may be what ya have there.

Look it up.

Black Incrusted.

Here in NM, I find stones like that all the time.

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Thanks HomeFire. I'm planning to go back to where I found this one and, hopefully, find a similar sample to run these tests on. Then we'll see what this little guy is made of.

Saginaw

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