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boog too me, both sound like great places. And these are in Alabama?

Rim

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Mr. Straight;

Met you at Primm some years was starting out and you showed me some great tips.

Glad to hear you are doing well and look forward to any new books you put out. Keep getting better every day.

Regards ;

Russell Weart, Needles, ca.

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Thanks Bill, just might do that. Went to the Gold Show and had a good time in Mesa.

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Rim, I got this info from a 1999 reprint of a bulletin issued by the Alabama Dept of Geology

Once I can get my boys finished with soccer, I plan on a trip to take a sample or two

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Cool boog! Can't wait to see what you find. And GL!

Rim

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Howdy All... Nugget Grubber and I have exchanged pm's. I thank him for his kind words.

I have been busy answering my mail. There is now beginning to be more interest in

epithermal precious metal ore deposits. I have been interested in them for many years.

For those of you who subscribe to Western & Eastern Treasures, I wrote short freelance

article about "Ellendale." It was published in the August 2012 issue.

To summarize, Ellie (Clifford) Nay was one of Ed Cliffords children. Ellie and my grandmother

Kate were friends dating back to about 1906 while at Clifford, Nye County Nevada (epithernal)

and when Ellie found her boulder of gold (about 75 pounds of specie highgrade) in Saulsbury

wash ( also in Nye County Nevada) in 1909 my grandmother just happend to be passing by and

stopped off to see Ellie...

To continue on with the article, Ellendale's star was bright and brief... A typical example of

a short lived epithermal precious metal ore deposit... It was associated with the Great

Basin Range Provence Tertiary (Pliocene and Miocene) volcanics (rhyoliite), and played

out fast.... Discovered in 1909 it was considered, played out and abandoned by about

1911. Even the dump was sorted and shipped (1939) during the Great Depression.

Now I will end my story: As some of you know, epithermal deposits are related to some of

the Carlin-type disseminated replacement deposits... Ellendale?... Also keep in mind

Ellie's boulder of highgrade float that she found in Saulsbury wash was traced to the

Ellendale mine... Now this can lead to questions as to the current status of Ellendale.

My earthlink carrier is just slow dialup and I'm limited in my abilty to "google." So maybe

it is worth checking out?... just a thought... Keep searching and be positive... more later...

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Just finished reading Jim's book on Dry Washers. I thought I would be able to use one, and was shopping. After reading the book and checking my area. I see that even at the dryest the material is too wet for dry washing. Thanks Jim for all the good info.

Live long and Prosper

:)

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I've read this article before and found it quite interesting

Thank's Jim.

I finally found the article I was looking for and as long as you have been a prospector you probably already know this guy.

http://www.goldgold....g-for-gold.html

Interesting that you brought up the distance between pods. This guy seems to think he can walk right to the next pod location. I guess if anyone can experience this several times, they can get good at guessing where the next location will be.

Have a great day!

Rim

I found this article quite interesting and informative.

A little more knowledge for us newbies.

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I see the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology (Mackay School of Mines University of Nevada Reno) report #47 is on the Internet, mining districts, maps the last part, 334 pages pdf, download takes time but full of info.

http://nsla.nevadaculture.org/statepubs/epubs/937994.pdf

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Question for you Jim. Have you ever explored the Juniper Mountain Range South of Ash Fork on I-40?

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Gosh... This thread is getting longer and longer... I'm learning from all of you. Rabbit and Sledge, there is much that

I do not know... However, to try to answer Rabbit, I believe that in the Republic area, some drywashing is being done.

Sledge... Sorry but I have not explored the areas around Ash Fork.

There is much I do not know, and some of the stuff I thought I knew, I really didn't.. I would like to mention that Bill has

now a 9/5/2012 Blog. In it he mentions about detecting old tailing piles for placer gold of metal-detectable size that

was rejected by either theheader screen as oversize; or the riffle tray for various reasons such not being caught

behind either the riffle or dead air space.

Many years ago I bought the dictionary of geological terms. The editors were Bates and Jackson. Mine is the

3rd edition (published in february 1983)... It mentions "slacking" on p. 471 and refers to the disintegration and

crumbling of earth materals exposed to air and sun... As we know some old drywash tailing piles seem to yeild

more gold as they are reworked again by drywashing. It is simply that the balls of caliche and clay slowly break

down by being exposed over time into smaller paricles freeing small bits of gold. So sometimes it pays to

re-work old tailing piles...more later... jim

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Gosh... This thread is getting longer and longer... I'm learning from all of you. Rabbit and Sledge, there is much that

I do not know... However, to try to answer Rabbit, I believe that in the Republic area, some drywashing is being done.

Sledge... Sorry but I have not explored the areas around Ash Fork.

There is much I do not know, and some of the stuff I thought I knew, I really didn't.. I would like to mention that Bill has

now a 9/5/2012 Blog. In it he mentions about detecting old tailing piles for placer gold of metal-detectable size that

was rejected by either theheader screen as oversize; or the riffle tray for various reasons such not being caught

behind either the riffle or dead air space.

Many years ago I bought the dictionary of geological terms. The editors were Bates and Jackson. Mine is the

3rd edition (published in february 1983)... It mentions "slacking" on p. 471 and refers to the disintegration and

crumbling of earth materals exposed to air and sun... As we know some old drywash tailing piles seem to yeild

more gold as they are reworked again by drywashing. It is simply that the balls of caliche and clay slowly break

down by being exposed over time into smaller paricles freeing small bits of gold. So sometimes it pays to

re-work old tailing piles...more later... jim

Thanks for answering Jim. I'm gonna explore the area more and I'll let ya know what I find or don't find, either way it's a win-win great weather and out enjoying the outdoors. :4chsmu1:

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Hey Sledge... everybody.... in my last post I mentioned "slacking"... Nah, I meant slaking.

But the dictionary of geological terms is correct. Simplemindedly, in some desert areas,

those out drywashing can lose smaller gold as it may be trapped in a larger ball of clay or

caliche and due to less specifc gravity,the lump can flow over the riffle tray and end up as a

tailings reject... In some more extreme situations, the mass could even pass over the

grizzly and wind up in the header reject pile... But over time the lumps tend to break down

due to being exposed to the air and sunlight... Thus, the same dirt can be drywashed later

and yield new gold... But I'm sure most of you who drywash know this already. In some

extreme cases, those in the know even pre-ran the first dug though a cement mixer first.

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Thanks again Jim. Hope to meet ya one day, you are so helpful to everyone on this forum sharing you're vast knowledge of geology and mining. :D

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Thanks again Jim. Hope to meet ya one day, you are so helpful to everyone on this forum sharing you're vast knowledge of geology and mining. :D

X2

Hope your hip is getting stronger each day Jim.

Rim

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I just got finished reading Jim Straights “Advanced Prospecting & Detecting for Hardrock Gold” – AGAIN, and it got me to thinking of how kind Jim was to me back in 2009. Jim personally autographed ALL of his books for me! I have read them all multiple times, and obviously, still read them from time-to-time. Thank you again Jim, these books are a prized possession that I now keep in the safe with my other gold nuggets!

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The absolute best and caused me to find many a nugget after reading, in case I haven't said this a few thousand times Jim Straight is on of my few true idolized authors and I have learned much from him! He is also one heck of a guy to have as a friend....

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Howdy Everyone... Terry and Bill.... Gosh this is what I do. I'm just an old guy who has been

lucky over my lifetime... I'm really in awe that Bill has done so much for me... thank you Bill.

Now I have something I would like to mention... It is about a magazine, Popular Mning. It was

unusual as it was written for and wrote by miners in a do-it-your-self innovation. If'n the article

was published, the "pay" was six issues (One Year) of Popular Mining. Thus, the contributing

writers were a truly unique workd-wide group who shared information which was circulated

throughout the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Europe, South America, Mexico,

Japan and other places to numerous to list here... The Managing editor was Nancy Glenn,

and the Founding editor was Jim Humble of Action Mining Service Inc.

Popular Mining started on a shoe-string in 1984 and was publshed bi-monthy for 12 years.

Nancy slowly created a quality magazine. By alas, although the magazine was in the 'black'

and established, Nancy decided that she could no longer spend the hours as Managing

Editor... and that was that...

However, prior issues were and likely still in demand. To get to the point Action Mining has

recently put all 12 years from 1984 - 1985 into five volumes. There is a introductory special

of all five, the compete set of all the articles written by the contributing writers. For those of

you who get the ICMJ, the November ICMJ Advertising Index, Action Mining's ad is on pg. 64.

I know that $150 for the full set of five may sound pricy, but ordered the full set and I'm

impressed that Nancy, now the General Manager of Action Mining Services spent countless

hours compiling all the issues into the five volume set. I sent a check for the full set and 12

days later the set arrived....Perfect Bound and quality paper... After looking over the set I'm

still glad I did...

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Jim

I am wondering if your books are still in print, and if so where might they be purchased. Good health and good hunting...

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:D Howdy Oakview2... Yes my books are in print. Bill Southern carries them. If the one you wish

is not availabe in his store, I will gladly drop ship it for Bill. Thanks for asking... Jim

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JIM,

INSTEAD OF SENDING YOU AN E-MAIL WITH PICS I KNOW YOUR CONNECTION IS SLOW, I'M POSTING IT HERE. ITS EASIER/FASTER FOR YOU TO SEE AND READ.

I COULDN'T RESIST THIS "YARD SALE" DRYWASHER. I LOVED THE DESIGN ON IT WITH A HINGED GRIZZLY AND THE COUNTER WEIGHTS ON THE DRIVESHAFT.

IT LOOKS A LITTLE LIKE A BECK AND A BIT LIKE A NICK'S NUGGET

SURE LOOKS LIKE IT WILL MAKE A FINE "HAND CRANK UNIT" IF I WERE TO GIVE IT A RESTORATION !!!!!!!!

THE HOPPER IS PRETTY BIG WOULD HAVE HELD A GOOD SIZED LOAD OF DIRT.

PLENTY OF GALVANIZED SHEET METAL TRIM ALSO. A RATHER "NEAT" FIND.

IT SEEMS TO HAVE HAD AN DETACHED MOTOR PULLEY SETUP FOR THE DRIVEBELT BECAUSE THERE ARE NO MOUNTING HOLES ON ANY PART OF IT THAT LOOK LIKE THEY HELD A PLATFORM AND DRIVE ASSEMBLY SO IT COULD HAVE HAD A GAS ENGINE OR AN ELECTRIC WASHING MACHINE MOTOR DRIVE.

JIM, CAN YOU RECOGNIZE THE DESIGN ???

OR DOES IT LOOK MORE LIKE A HOMEBUILT ??

EITHER WAY IT SURE HAS THE APPEARANCE OF A MIGHTY FINE / FAST DRYWASHER.

THE ONLY FAULT I SEE IS IT DOESN'T FOLD UP , BUT MOST OF THE OLDER ONES DIDN'T THEY JUST TOSSED EM IN THE BACK OF WHATEVER THEY WERE DRIVIN.

I'M THINKIN 1960'S OR 1970'SS WHAT DO YOU SAY JIM ???

IF I TAKE THE TIME TO RESTORE AND UPGRADE IT I WILL HAVE TO CALL IT "THE MOHAVE" :old:

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Edited by frank c

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:D Howdy Oakview2... Yes my books are in print. Bill Southern carries them. If the one you wish

is not availabe in his store, I will gladly drop ship it for Bill. Thanks for asking... Jim

Thanks for the response and a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to you and yours.....

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Frank,

You'll have to get a trailer for your Quad to get that baby where you want it but you could do some big dirt with 4-5 people pushing buckets through that one. If you do that some time I'll grab a shovel for a few hours.

Mitchel

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Mitch if I were to restore it I would incorporate a folding design into it.

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Good Morning Frank and all of you fine folks that read and post

on Bill's forum. I'm highly inpressed by the creativity of the

"yard sale" drywasher that Frank was kind enough to post on

this link for all of us to share. It is truly an example of

one of the many "hand crafted by loving hands" that are still

to be found. Beginning in the 1900's there was a lot of

handcrafted by desert placer miners; paricularily in Nevada

ad Arizona. Thomas "drywasher" Wilson was one of the better

known creator of early designs. He was one of the first to

be aware of the placer gold-silver "electum" gold that was to

be found at many of the small and high grade epithermal hard

rock mines that were being found in the Great Basin of Nevada

during the early 1900's such as the well known epithermal

ore deposits of "stronger strength" (to quote Dragline Miller)

at Tonopah Goldfield and Manhattan. However, there were also

hundreds of smaller epithermal "blowouts" (a crude term which

can mean most anything).

frank's "garage sale" example seems to be highly refinded with

attention to small details. Likely as Frank noted it was possibly

an example made by someone such as Otto Lynch. It being painted

green is my best clue.) Mr. Lynch was out activly using various

examples "home brew" examples during the 1950-1970's and was the

the author of "Fnding GOLD in the Desert - the art of drywashing"

which included drywasher plans. It may still be in print and is a

great read. The late Mr. Lynch was a crusty "old bird" and would

now be about 100 y/o. Author Sam Radding in his super excellent

book "Desert Gold DRYWASHING - a dry placer gold mining primer for

the desert miner" features Mr. lynch on the cover of his book.

Thanks for the trip down "memory lane."

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