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So I have wanted to get into medorite hunting, but I don't know where to start. I don't know where to find resources, where to go and the like. I live in salt lake so I'm not sure what areas are nearby. Can anyone give me some guidance where to start? I have a minelab 705 and have experience prospecting, but the space rocks are still a mystery to me. Any help would be nice! Thanks!

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Don't know where to start? Space rocks are still a mystery? How many books have you read? How many mineral shows have you gone to? Young man, there is soooooo much you can be teaching yourself! How deep into this Badger hole do want to go? Read some books! Start with "Field guide to Geology"( I forgot who wrote it and it's not in front of me cause I loaned it to a friend), O. Richard Norton's "Rocks from Space" and his "Field Guide to Meteorites and Meteorite Hunting". Get a beginner's guide to metal Detecting, this one may sound a little crazy, but trust me on this. Mark Twain's "Roughing It", it's filled with pearls of wisdom about bein in the wildrness. And then there is 100's of hours you can do on the internet.ie; U-tube video's about metal detecting, prospecting, and meteorite hunting. Find a local ameture geology or rock hounding club and join it, so much you can be teaching yerself. This bein a "learning curve" is an understatement, it'll be more like taveling a twisty, hilly, turny, 50,000 mile gravel highway on foot. and you WILL pick up and look at 1000's of leaverites and meteorongs, but this will be THE COOLEST trail you could ever walk yer life down! And you'll ALLWAYS be learnin something new. Start with a magnet on a stick and walk some dry lakes, so much you could be teachin yerself in the meantime. But, good luck, and git started on that uuh, hehehe, "learning curve"

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Franks right you can learn much just thru curiousity by reading and searching for written and photographic info.

ALSO heres a link to get you started in your area UTAH ENTER UNITED STATES AND CHECK PLACES AND ENTER UTAH and it will give you a page with all the finds in your state click on each and get a description and place where it was found.

http://www.lpi.usra....eteor/index.php

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  • 2 months later...

I'm just a little further along than JordanD but RockHunter's advice is right on. I've been reading as much as I can find and just getting out and applying what I've read; anywhere. Rocks fall everywhere; all the time. Don't let any one tell you that there are no more to be found (Like I was told). Another thing I find useful is looking at as many photo's of meteorites as I can find. I can't go to these places and see them up close, so the photos are a valuable aid with my learning. Get familiar with all the different characteristics and features like terrestrial weathering (what will an iron look like that has been in a moist environment vs a dry one?), flow lines, weight (is a chondrite as heavy as an iron?), and lots more, Bring home anything you're suspicious of; don't just toss it. Look at it later and compare it with the photos I mentioned. Sure, you may end up with a pile in your backyard but you'll never have to kick yourself over those you left behind.

To start you out, I can recommend a site with some great photos. It is: http://www.meteorite...ensammlung.htm.

Don't get discouraged, just get out and good luck.

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I have just gotten interested in meteorites too. I picked up a copy of Field Guide to Meteors and Meteorites by Norton and Chitwood (2008 publication date). Has great, if not some pretty technical, information on what seems to be all aspects of meteorites along with good pics of real and not real specimens. Goes into how to do simple but effective tests and just what to look for when seaching. Excellent references to further study also.

John

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Hi Jordan,

What these guys say is true. I was an active gold hunter and detectorist and heard that some of the "hot rocks" found detecting, might be valuable. I bought "Rocks From Space" when it came out in 1998. We started searching what little was on the internet in 2000. I copied every meteorite photo on the net that I could find. I spent hundreds of hours "data mining" anything regional on meteorites, and lots of library time, too. Then we started visiting areas where meteorites had already been found. I also spent alot of time at the annual Gold Show, talking with a Minelab dealer named Hoss Blackman about a place called Gold Basin. Through research, I also stumbled on the rough location for the Franconia Strewnfield. By the winter of 03-04 we had found our first meteorites. Then we found the Nuggetshooter Forum, and even more networking at the annual Tucson Show. I now have found many meteorites, and even a new one that was classified. We all start at the same place. I thank God that my son and I were able to experience this together. It's not about the destination, it's about the journey. To find meteorites, you need to wear out several pairs of boots. "When you are able to cross this rice-paper and leave no trace, you will have learned" (Kung Fu, the series)

Ben

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  • 1 month later...

hey sorry i havent been online for a bit! Had to get a new computer and im not one to pull a loan for something as such. but the advise is great! with the process of finding though, do i use a detector? or will i need to hound it out with my own two eyes? any learning techniques anyone knows of?

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Thanks Wayne! I have started doing some research on this. what im having difficulty with is locating a good area where landings would be. also when using a detector, what medal do meteorites ring up as? i know ill be able to find it online somewhere, but it doesnt hurt to ask to see if i can narrow down some searching :barnie:

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Aloha Jordan,

If at all possible you might want to attend the franconia group outing this weekend. I know of a couple guys who came out to one of these informal meetings and now they are kicking some serios butt in finding some nice specimens. If you can make it stick close to Richard,Jim and Wendy.

Good luck in the future with this new hobby.

Aloha.

Stan aka Kaimi

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Aloha Jordan,

If at all possible you might want to attend the franconia group outing this weekend. I know of a couple guys who came out to one of these informal meetings and now they are kicking some serios butt in finding some nice specimens. If you can make it stick close to Richard,Jim and Wendy.

Good luck in the future with this new hobby.

Aloha.

Stan aka Kaimi

ah i wish i would have known about this one earlier! i would have made plans for a road trip! well at least it is an annual thing so i think ill make it next year. though in the meantime ill be able to hone some skills so im not completely clueless! :89:

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With your attitude and thirst for knowledge you will likely do quite well me thinks :old: Patience is good to and you also seem to have that. Stick with us and we will put some oil on that honing stone for ya... :4chsmu1:

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Hey thanks Bill! I always am thankful for those who are willing to help a beginner out. Its nice to have someone to talk with on this as not many people share the same interests. Serious prospectors and detectorists are hard to come by. I am excited to meet all of the folk out there that share my same insanity :ROFL: its hard to come by people who really enjoy hunting. Thanks again!

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Thanks Wayne! I have started doing some research on this. what im having difficulty with is locating a good area where landings would be. also when using a detector, what medal do meteorites ring up as? i know ill be able to find it online somewhere, but it doesnt hurt to ask to see if i can narrow down some searching :barnie:

"also when using a detector, what medal do meteorites ring up as?"Generally IRON The Whites GMT actually produces a GRUNT sound when IRON content is detected.

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"also when using a detector, what medal do meteorites ring up as?"Generally IRON The Whites GMT actually produces a GRUNT sound when IRON content is detected.

what about the xterra 705? im assuming iron as well. can meteorites come in different metals as well?

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Jordan; nickel/iron is the only free metal one is likely to find in meteorites with a metal detector...there have been meteorites found with trace metals such as copper and gold but not in detectable quanities...

That however does not mean that there are no gold or visible-diamond filled meteorites siiting unfound somewhere on this earth...but, don't bet the farm on finding one...

fred

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Hi, Jordan. The best place to start is by studying as many meteorites as you can! Visit museums and study the displays. Look at picutres online, like the Encyclopedia of Meteorites, or any other number of reputable sources (beware of individuals posting "meteorite" pictures, it's easy for the laymen to misidentify a meteorite). Read, read, read! O. Richard Norton's Field Guide to Meteorites and Rocks From Space are excellent and informative. Geoff Notkin's book Meteorite Hunting: How To Find Treasure From Space has some excellent photography and provides some good tips for beginning hunters.

Finding meteorites is hard enough, but it becomes exponentially more difficult if you cannot recognize them from earth rocks! It's also a good idea to familiarize yourself with what a meteorite doesn't look like. One of the best collections of meteorwrong photos can be found here: http://meteorites.wu...ongs.htm. Test yourself! Go through the photos, see if you can figure out what it is before you read the description, as there are a few actual meteorites in that photo gallery.

Good luck, hope to see you in the field!

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cool ill need to do some searching and some books to buy! i have a bunch on gold and gold recovery as well as one on rock hounding (though i havent quite gotten into that yet as the gold and metal detecting bugs have gotten me pretty good). I have lots of research ahead of me ha. But when searching is it better to use the metal detector in the desert? or would it be better to just spot them when walking around? i have seen a couple videos and i never get a for sure answer. i guess it wouldnt hurt to have the detector with me when searching anyway ha

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Great advice already given, no sense in repeating it.

I'd add that you should get acquainted with the met-bul, the Meteoritical Bulletin, here: Meteoritical Bulletin Search the Database

That will identify know meteorite finds in your area, state, region or whatever, and it has great pictures of the meteorites so you can learn what you're looking for.

Enjoy.

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