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Goldfinger

Search Patterns in the Field

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Hey Jim, you did real good there brother, ya gotta luv Gold Basin, Fe, Ni, and Au, the only sweeter element is O2. I see just the gold ttere, but if you say you got meteorites too, I believe ya.

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The pictures look like grey (black and white) tones to me ...nice gold! thanks

fred

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Steve has me scratching my head! :idunno:

Jim

I must have went colorblind overnight or something. :hahaha:

Steve

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I can see them fine....I'll take another picture and put the link somewhere other than PhotoBucket. I just can't win.

Hey, if i hurt my back lifting and carrying that meteorite outside, you guys are gonna have to buy me a beer...or two...or three! Hehehe! :brows: I'll be back in a few minutes with a picture or two.

Jim

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I can see them in color as well, don't know what the problem is for the ones that can't, maybe the browser they're using, or maybe using a mobile device/cell phone. :idunno:

Skip

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Okay, If I screw up here, Bill or Skip...I apologize...please delete if necessary.

Now for the gold and meteorites

DSCN0796.JPG

DSCN0797.JPG

Now, if you can't see it, that is near an ounce of gold in those three rocks and 480 grams of meteorite. Mix'em all up and it's one awesome day!

These are low resolution macros, so you should be able to zoom around, etc.

Jim

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I use a Gold Bug II with a 14" coil. Wendy uses a GBII with a 10" coil and our spare has a 10" coil that I sometimes use. The first small rock with the gold was about 6" deep on the bottom of a very rocky wash near the edge. The second one was about 12" deep in same hole and I did not know it was there until digging the other out and swinging over the hole. The third one (the biggest) was right above the hole in the edge of the bank about 12" in.

The eyeball detector caught the meteorite. Found a few other meteorites with the detector, most were just about on the surface.

Jim

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Being able to find specimens like those at Gold Basin is impressive (at least to me) in this day and age with the SD's and GP's all over the place. Proves there's still hope for the little guys with just the VLF's and VHF's.

Steve

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Being able to find specimens like those at Gold Basin is impressive (at least to me) in this day and age with the SD's and GP's all over the place. Proves there's still hope for the little guys with just the VLF's and VHF's.

Steve

Steve,

Believe this or not, there was a 3500 and a 4500 Minelab and a GMT out there on this hunt. Both Minelabs were having issues hearing the gold, not to mention the issues with the planes, helicopters and wind. The smaller rocks were very very weak on the minelabs and overloaded a GMT (the famous grunt they make) and I thought the GBII was going to start smoking the signal was so hot.

I would not rule out VLF's....at least these two units....not to mention my shoulder was still in place at the end of the day!

Jim

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Jim, it was a 5000, with a 22" coil, It picked up on the honker nugget good, but will not see the smaller nuggets unless they are solid. I had no interference the whole day on the minelab, just had to change out coils, as I could not climb hills all day with the UFO coil. The minelab does not like scattered gold in quartz/ hemetite as much as a solid nugget. I went back out yesterday, and found more gold and meteorites, but at another location. But congrats on your score.

Dave

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I use a Gold Bug II with a 14" coil. Wendy uses a GBII with a 10" coil and our spare has a 10" coil that I sometimes use. The first small rock with the gold was about 6" deep on the bottom of a very rocky wash near the edge. The second one was about 12" deep in same hole and I did not know it was there until digging the other out and swinging over the hole. The third one (the biggest) was right above the hole in the edge of the bank about 12" in.

The eyeball detector caught the meteorite. Found a few other meteorites with the detector, most were just about on the surface.

Jim

Jim,

From all the stuff I have read about GB2 vs. the Minelabs, that's pretty dam impressive. I'd take that size gold all day long.

12" deep is about all I would want to dig anyway. Unless I stuck it back in hole and found another one 12" deep... :hahaha: :hahaha:

Rim

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That was hard digging too as it was pretty much all rock. I do wonder, if I were to go back to that spot and dig it out all around there, if I'd beep on any more that I can't hear now. Keep in mind this was the first cherry popping gold I have ever detected for and I am as green as it gets for experience when it comes to gold hunting.

I might have some what of a fever now come to think about it. I also thought about digging a few buckets of the dirt around there to later run through a washer or pan it...might be worth it. I did not continue to dig after finding this stuff...I am looking back, that was probably a mistake. Digging and trying to find hard pan may have been a good idea???

I have without a doubt seen Jason find and dig deeper small targets with his 3500 and we have compared and tested. No doubt a deeper machine....the 3500. However, at the end of the day, we all find meteorites and I typically find as many. Still we are all happy campers. I do not have the interference issues he has which were kicking his butt out there the other day. The wind, the helicopters and the aircraft do wonders to his machine. I was a little shocked and I think Dave and Jason were too that they were having trouble with the gold. Jason actually had a vial with a very little amount of gold in it. He could barely hear it. The GBII went nuts over it. There was night and day difference between the two machines. His GBII as well as Wendy's also went nuts!

Sure is strange to me.

I hope to meet up with FrankC in the near future and have him swing over those pieces too.

Jim

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That was hard digging too as it was pretty much all rock. I do wonder, if I were to go back to that spot and dig it out all around there, if I'd beep on any more that I can't hear now. Keep in mind this was the first cherry popping gold I have ever detected for and I am as green as it gets for experience when it comes to gold hunting.

I might have some what of a fever now come to think about it. I also thought about digging a few buckets of the dirt around there to later run through a washer or pan it...might be worth it. I did not continue to dig after finding this stuff...I am looking back, that was probably a mistake. Digging and trying to find hard pan may have been a good idea???

I have without a doubt seen Jason find and dig deeper small targets with his 3500 and we have compared and tested. No doubt a deeper machine....the 3500. However, at the end of the day, we all find meteorites and I typically find as many. Still we are all happy campers. I do not have the interference issues he has which were kicking his butt out there the other day. The wind, the helicopters and the aircraft do wonders to his machine. I was a little shocked and I think Dave and Jason were too that they were having trouble with the gold. Jason actually had a vial with a very little amount of gold in it. He could barely hear it. The GBII went nuts over it. There was night and day difference between the two machines. His GBII as well as Wendy's also went nuts!

Sure is strange to me.

I hope to meet up with FrankC in the near future and have him swing over those pieces too.

Jim

Jim,

It would be interesting to know how many holes have been dug that are 2 or 3 feet deep, while using a Minelab, ended up being worthless efforts.

Rim

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The short answer is many in about the same ration as shallower holes trash to gold ratios. I don't concentrate on meteorites but I would have to assume you could probably exchange the word gold for meteorite and be pretty safe. My guess is that the deeper holes may have a slightly smaller gold to trash ratio. And I would also guess that each prospector in his/her area may have higher or lower ratios than I may have in, say, my area. In other words there will not be one pat answer for you.

That should make it clear as mud for you!

Mike F

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The short answer is many in about the same ration as shallower holes trash to gold ratios. I don't concentrate on meteorites but I would have to assume you could probably exchange the word gold for meteorite and be pretty safe. My guess is that the deeper holes may have a slightly smaller gold to trash ratio. And I would also guess that each prospector in his/her area may have higher or lower ratios than I may have in, say, my area. In other words there will not be one pat answer for you.

That should make it clear as mud for you!

Mike F

Mike,

Yup! Clear as mud. I think it's a youngback oldback thing. lol!

Rim

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I can tell you from long and tiring experience that all the deep holes I have dug have ended up being a can, foil, wire or iron junk...I keep digging for the same reason I dig pulltabs when coin hunting...sometimes it pays off...sometime, some day a 2-3 foot hole will have my many oz nugget in it...I can feel it coming. Now, surface finds for gold and junk are different...and gold basin meteorites that I have found rarely have a lot of junk around them, they are also shallow...I have yet to find a nugget while hunting for meteorites in gold basin...but, I will...

Jim, you should definitely go back and dig thet area out and detect it...the gold may not be any deeper as there is no water flow to concentrate the gold as in rivers and ravines...

btw, sometimes I have my camera set to portrait and I get a washed out image...just a thought...

fred

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Hi Fred,

If you hunt Gold Basin long enough, you're going to find some gold. A few years back, on one of the Annual Nuggetshooter Outings, I found a nice little nugget only 50 feet off a beautifully graded dirt road while I was warming up the detector, to hunt more meteorites. I know there are some small chondrites but, heck, I couldn't find it, and it wouldn't stick to the neo on the head of my pick. I was very surprised to see the deep yellow color when I gently blew the fine dirt out of my hand. I wasn't in one of the big washes that always have guys drywashing in them. It was in a very shallow, unimpressive drainage, under 4 inches of dirt.

Good Hunting, Ben

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hey Ben; how are you and your son doing?

i was not clear...I have found gold in GB and i have found meteorites in Gb, but, I have not found a nugget down low while hunting meteorites...there is always hope to find a nugget and a meteorite in the same hole like Frank did a couple years ago...

best wishes

fred

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Fred it is funny how most gols is between 3 and 7 inches deep, I have only found 1 good gold nugget at close to 2 feet, those gold basins are one the surface and down 4 inches in some areas,aLL MY 2 FT TO 3 FT HOLES HAVE BEN TRASH

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HEY to all you ol codgers, I tell ya the truth,.......

I wouldn't trade off any of them 1 2 3 or 4 foot deep holes I have dug, the horseshoes, cans, hubcaps, etc. and the SWEAR WORDS that go with them at the target recovery for a VLF for my standard hunting machine.

And I have a "Vampire Nugget' at 2.49 ounces of weight and a few 1/4 and 1/2 oz species to prove it.

A VLF is a valuable tool and has its place. Just as the P.I. does.

By the way do any of you use a butter knife to enjoy a nice steak dinner ????? Get the point.

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Ahhhh ... Frank ... A butter knife doesn't have a point! He said with a straight face!

Mike F

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HI Guys

There's been a few nice cold finds recently- notably by Frank C, Todd and Terry.. If I were lucky enough to come across a nice meteorite specimen in the field, how would you go about searching for other pieces- if any? Is there some procedure that would help cut down on overlapping? Surely just wandering around hoping to find other pieces would be counterproductive and wasteful.. How far out would one search? There has to be a method to this madness.... Hope someone can provide some insight.

Steve

Great question! Finding a cold find meteorite in a new area is exciting. Trouble is you only found one, and don't know where the limits of the strewn field are. Thus the need for a diligent search of the area to find more.

I would think that the search area would depend on the size of the meteorite found, and its location and condition. If you find a large piece, say 1000g or more, and it's sitting on top of a mesa and in good condition, I'd want to thoroughly search the rest of the mesa top, probably using a grid search. On the other hand, if you find a small piece, say 10-15g or so that is pretty beaten up and lying in the bottom of a wash, I'd want to go up the wash looking for more, just walking along the wash swinging my MD and looking for meteorites, and not pay too much attention to the area alongside the wash. when I found some additional pieces, I'd start looking in a wider area there.

My thinking is that the one on top of the mesa probably fell there to start with, while the one in the bottom of the wash probably got beaten up rolling downstream during times of water flow, and the main strewn field may be considerable distance upstream, uphill, from there. Also, finding larger pieces indicates you're at the "big end" of the strewn field, and large pieces will likely be fewer and farther apart, while small pieces indicate you're at the "small end" of the field and there's likely several similar pieces nearby.

Of course, going with your gut feeling and trusting to luck has produced some remarkable finds, too. LOL

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