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New and wanted to say hey


ncheek16

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Hey everybody. I'm new to the forum and new to prospecting.

I'm in Indiana, not much gold here, just glacial gold... but its still fun finding those little flakes.

I'm mainly just getting into the hobby because I like being outside, and this is another way to be outdoors and find some interesting stuff.

I was wondering what kind of stuff other than gold could I be on the lookout for in Central/Southern Indiana, and as always, any advice you have is more than welcome :)

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Welcome to the forum

I had a buddy of mine who lived in Elkhart and always used to pan for glacial gold in his spare time. He did quite well and showed me a small vial half full that he had collected over the years.

As far as other things you might be able to collect in Indiana, here's what I found.. Not sure where Bedford is in relation to where you live but I would sure try my luck here. Millerite geodes are spectacular and well worth going after...

State Route 37 Roadcut near Bedford, Indiana

Geodes containing Barite, Calcite, Dolomite, Marcasite, Millerite, Pyrite, Quartz, and Sphalerite

Source: The Mineralogical Record v.22/#5 September-October 1991 ISSN 0026-4628 ©1991

Geodes containing a large variety of minerals are to be found in a 15 foot thick chirty layer of limestone exposed by the roadcut along State Route 37, 10.5 miles north of Bedford. This collecting site is just south of the Monroe Lake exit.

Typical geode specimens contain quartz with either calcite, dolomite or barite. Less common are geodes containing marcasite, millerite tufts and sprays, pyrite or sphalerite. Specimens range in size from under 1" to over 36" in diameter. Care should be exercised in obtaining and opening any specimens found embedded in massive limestone as these are most the likely to contain the delicate millerite.

Other local outcrops in this area are reported to have yielded geodes containing ankerite, aragonite, goethite, siderite and honessite.

Good Luck

Steve

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ok.. so i should be looking for geodes? I've found several of them in my day... How do you tend to break them up? What should i look for when i break them? How do you guys ID them? Do you have a good guide or pic to represent what they look like? Any value to Millerite?

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Here are some example of geodes with millerite. You will not know what they look like until you open them. The best way is with a rock saw and a hammer is the last option... Millerite is very fragile.. If I was in your location I would simply go to that road cut and look for signs of them. Will probably need a hammer, chisel, heavy gloves and eyeglasses to extract them. Can bring big bucks if you find some good specimens with millerite. But it will be a lot of work...

http://www.irocks.com/render.html?species=Millerite

http://www.johnbetts-fineminerals.com/jhbnyc/mineralmuseum/picshow.php?id=24899

Steve

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yea all i've done is panned in streams, thats where i've heard you'll find it around here... not much gets found but its somethin fun to do and hopefully like steve was saying, I can find some other stuff to maybe make a lil cash ;)

Steve since you've worked in this area before, any tips ?

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Steve since you've worked in this area before, any tips ?

While I have not been to Indiana for geodes, i do have experience in looking for and mining them. All you can do is try to find that location. When you get there,start scanning the side of the roadcut for signs of geodes which will be roundish or even semi-roundish in nature. If you find signs of one, use your hammer and chisel to carefully remove the rock around it without doing damage to the geode itself. At some point you'll be able to extract it. A small pry bar would be another tool to bring. A ladder would also be beneficial. . It's a 15 foot thick layer so there may be some towards the top..

If you don't see any signs of them at that road cut, the other option is to inquire with the local property owners and see if they have any outcrops that contain geodes, then ask for permission...

Steve

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By the way, most of these geodes that contain millerite are only one to three inches in diameter so don't toss the small ones away. Sometimes bigger is not always better and it's the smaller ones that pack the most punch....

Here's another location for geodes in Indiana. There's probably a few more areas that have them but you'll have to ask around.

Lehigh Portland Cement Co. Quarry, Mitchell, Lawrence Co., Indiana, USA

Steve

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yup i'm 22 and a Senior in college. Probably one of the younger ones on this board... My gpa got me stared doing this, and i've loved it ever since. Haven't found much but theres nothing more fun that being outside and playing in a creek!

Steve,

Thanks for your help! I really appreciate it!

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spent a couple hours in the creek today only found a couple flakes. its not the best spot around ... its in brown county at my brothers property.. I was able to find quite a few geodes as well as a really cool fossilized shell.. it looks like a conch shell, its about 5 inches long and prob 3 inches in diameter, looks really cool!!!! i was excited about it!

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Even us older guys (I'm 37) like playing in the mud - it never gets old.

What's your major? Good to see a young man with an apparently good head on his shoulders. Good on ya!

You know, I've probably found geodes at one time or another, but just thought they were round rocks. Never knew to look for them, specifically. How does one go about identifying a geode from said round rocks?

That shell does sound very interesting... To think, where you were standing was once the bottom of a shallow ocean. Geologic history is pretty amazing. I am even considering taking some classes and going after an associates or possibly BS in geology. It just interests the day lights out of me and is so far removed from my work life (technology and software) that it offers another venue to keep my CRS at bay.

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