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GeoJack

Pocket Gold outcropping

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Steve,

Did Vickery ever mention the pocket theory to you. Or did he make his discoveries after the late 90's?

Just curious.

Rim

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Rim-

Preston was a good hunter, a very hard worker but never discussed methods, theories,etc. He rarely came back to camp skunked but there were a lot of guys that did well back in those days.. Only worked with him for perhaps 6 to 8 weeks and never saw him again. This must have been either 1998- or 1999.

Steve

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I am really getting into this thread guys! I was really stoked about hunting for gold in pockets in my area too. I had met several people who told me about a local guy who had dug out a few pockets and did excellent. In fact! Go to the falcon metal detector website. Somewhere on that page is a link to customer reviews or testimonials. One section is about a guy named "hardrock Will" and it has pictures of him and the insane chunks of gold he found. At first I was amped to find some, but after spending a couple weeks doing nothing but hiking to all the veins I could see and taking samples of good looking ore, using my loupe, and using my detector I have found not a single piece. Guys I know persistence pays off but since this is how I pay the bills there comes a time when I just have to set the detector down and go back to drywashing average gravel. I'd rather have a tiny pile of gold at the end of a day than nothing. Nothing is consistently what I bring back when I detect or scout for hard rock gold. I Know I'm in a good area for hard rock. I know there are tons of smaller veins that haven't been found. And even a lot of the big veins they were mining were just left when the mines shutdown. I have sampled and crushed ore from more veins than I care to count. I have never found a actual piece of gold it's all been so small it is dust and would take me a bout 200 crushed buckets to get a gram. I don't understand how these miners made it work when gold was 20$ an ounce and I can barely scrape by at 1300$ an ounce in the same spot! So yes I am eating all this info up thank you for the great tips and posts guys.

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Oh, lol, just realized I was a little late to the show.....well if anyone wants to jump back in.....feel free!

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Hey I learned something new here too so not a loss.

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One of my goals is to find some gold still attached to the center of the earth so any bits of information that I steal from this forum will get used.

I remember a few pocket hunters from around here when I was a kid. They were always broke and were a really peculiar bunch. I should fit right in.

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The keyy is vertical veins. Veins on a flat incline rarely have the supergene enrichment going that makes a pocket. And since supergene enrichhment concentrates oxidized ore the vein above pockets can be quite poor.

Oxidized ore with rotten, crumbling texture. Vertical, narrow veins that pinch and swell. Hardrock gold in placer form below. A depressed or concave area along the strike of a vein rather than an outcrop. or spine (convex). Those are your only real clues to a pocket.

Most pockets are shallow and in small veins adjacent to large mainn veins. All of the pockets I know of that have been found have been within a few feet of a big shaft on a well explored vein. Not too far down over a pinch out. One was on an obvious viein between two shafts.

Almost every mine in Hillsboro started over a pocket. The gold went down in pockets over pinches until it hit waterline and turned to sulphide ores. Most mines went down 100 feet or so and then drifted horizontally under the oxidized zone. Then they stoped to within a few feet of the surface from beneath. Most of the old mines were after "pocket gold" in that oxidized zone. After smelters and roads and trains they focused more on the deeper, larger sulphide ores carryinng copper. Very little work has been done with the free gold bearing oxidized zone since. Look in that oxidized zone for the soft weathered hematite gossan. Below any of that type of ore there could be a pocket. There are many of them left.

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Tom, I just noticed your PM this morning. I am very sorry for not seeing it earlier. "The Elusive Pocket Gold of Southwestern Oregon"


written by Tom Bohmker.



Thanks all, TRINITYAU/RAYMILLS




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TrinityAU,

I am very interested in your brain.... :worship: I have 'The Elusive Pocket Gold of Southwestern Oregon' and a fascination with locating a pocket. But I don't have much free time and live a few hours away from ground with the right mineralization. I'm wondering if you have any home-based research that you might suggest. I have maps of all the geology, faults, gold mines in Oregon. Obviously, I have Tom B's book. Are there any additional resources you might suggest. Or perhaps some advice to use what I have in a way I may not have thought of? I run a Gold Bug Pro and I want me some pocket gold!

Cy

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Hello Cy, it is very difficult to try and narrow things down for you. The problem in trying to discuss pockets or lines is that they show up differently at different locales. I can tell you what to look for here at my location but it may be completely different where you are at. We both may have opposing geology while we may also have some similar features. When I take a person out training I try and show them what is happening on the ground. The geology of your local area may be different but the set-up in my mind is probably pretty similar anywhere.

Let me try a different approach. Lots of people are on the lookout for a contact zone. This is good but too many people read too much into it. Some will see a quartz stringer running across the surface and call it a contact zone. While this may be true to an extent there is bit more to it. The area that I am located at has a general push from the NW to the SE. This push is the general direction in which the most prevalent base material is heading. In my neck of the woods this is shale, any color shale. So, as I am walking along I am watching the ground near and afar and seeing that common trend from NW to SE. While walking I notice that there is a dike or a seam, whatever you want to call it, of a different material crossing or cutting the general trend of shale that I have been looking at. This different material can be three feet wide or thee inches wide or it can be tiny seams that are matchbook wide, does not really matter. Here in my area it is usually Granite, Diorite, or Quartz and I have even seen shale crosscutting shale. As I stated earlier what you are watching for is the odd body of material that is cutting your general trending material.

Once I have come across a location like this I slow down and try to find its limits. At times an area can be very small and precise while at other times the area could be very large, literally square acres. Let me break down (limits). When you have one material crossing another, let's say shale being crossed by diorite, most times you will have a change in the color of the immediate and surrounding area. I try to line this area out so I can determine the likely erosion path. Remember, what is the down side of a hill now might have been just opposite millions of years ago. Finding these limits can be very frustrating when you are in an area that has lots of grass and foilage. Sometimes you will have outcroppings of the crossing material and this can really help to identify a direction. This may sound way out there, but there are many types of vegetation that grow only in certain ground conditions. This too can be a possible lead to a location. Once determined what direction that erosion has taken place I start to detect. If I am on a slope I go down the hillside several hundred feet and then start back up detecting as I go. I like to zig zag across the slope until I come across that first piece. At that point I start to concentrate on that area and up the hill. Yes, there are times that I do not get a piece and I may have to change my hunt tactics and become a little more intense with my search efforts. Of course there are times that all the pieces of the puzzle come together and there still just is no gold to be found. This happened to me a lot when I first started detecting for pockets. After a few years things became clearer and began to go my way. Once on a line/pocket you can almost run it out with a compass. I am talking about a sometimes straight line that will throw detectable gold on the surface accompanied by a clay or ironstone seam. These lines or pockets occur around the contacts that I have mentioned and can be traced for miles. An interesting scenario that I encounter in my area is that a lot of the most productive areas that I have located seem to always show up on the southeast facing slopes. So much so that I tend to seek out just those slopes.

Many people are too engrossed in looking for the quartz on the surface. In my local area there is virtually no quartz at many of the locations where pockets or lines have been found. This brings me to another point. When I say pockets most people are thinking of a single location where gold has been trapped and found, such as a crevice in bedrock. Others are thinking of an enriched zone of a vein that has pocketed out and left goodies behind. What I am after when I say pockets are these lines or very small areas that run immediately below the mentioned contacts. Are they worth it ? I think they are and many of my friends have learned over the years to become "one with the dirt", and the gold starts to show up.

I will say that this may just be an anomaly to the Redding,Ca area but I know that is not true. I have done the same thing in other parts of California, Nevada and Oregon. It is not easy and it can be really frustrating but it has been very rewarding for me over the years. This is a different type of hunting. I do hunt the old diggings, ground sluice operations, gullies and creeks, hardrock deposits and any other locations that the old timers worked but I like the thrill of finding gold in places where no one is looking. I hope this helps some, these are my thoughts from thousands of hours on the ground that I have hunted for pockets and lines. TRINITYAU/RAYMILLS

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I do hunt the old diggings, ground sluice operations, gullies and creeks, hardrock deposits and any other locations that the old timers worked but I like the thrill of finding gold in places where no one is looking. I hope this helps some, these are my thoughts from thousands of hours on the ground that I have hunted for pockets and lines. TRINITYAU/RAYMILLS

Sounds like we're pretty much on the same page. Although I don't hunt former diggings, I'm more into prospecting and discovering new areas. Here's the way I figure it... in this day and age we have at our disposal state-of-the-art technology that the miners of yore could only dream of. We have the latest in geology reports, historical soil and mineral data, google earth, GPS's, topo maps, ohmmeters, gold detectors, and mechanical mules (Rokons or quads) that will haul our equipment, and take us just about anywhere we want to go. My theory is there is no way in hell that all the miners of yore could cover every acre of gold bearing ground. Just like the prospectors of today, they followed the crowd and most often went after the easy stuff. I'm not a crowd follower, I prefer to blaze my own trails. If I don't find anything, then so be it. I have fun just getting out and riding. :yesss:

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One thing to remember is that prospectors back in the day were looking for high grade veins and ore.So if lower grade gold bearing veins were found they were often left unworked.This doesn't mean that lower grade veins don't contain high grade here and there.But then again they may not contain species either.If you've done this type of stuff for years you know that any gold bearing vein has potential..for a pocket...or heartbreak.

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Thanks Bob, that's exactly what I was looking for , some info based on this particular area! I was thinking about it today, if you just dug a hole four to five feet across and a foot deep each day to expose the ore. In a month you'd have a forty foot shaft. That's probably way deeper than I'd go but it's good to know it is within reach and maybe one of those pockets will be in my pocket some day.

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Yes! Love it, love it, thanks Ray! That is some great descriptive writing. In another life I was a forester. There is no doubt that species composition changes with soil type, I wouldn't have thought of that in the field looking for pockets.

Chris, could you tell me how to squeeze a few more days into some of my my months? :yesss:

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I keep reading over and over this post and there is so much learning in it, well I think it should be pinned Bill. JMO.

Rim

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Hey Rim I knew Preston Vickery and George Duffy. Duffy hunted with Smokey all the time up in Nevada. we ran into each other from time to time and talked in the bars but never hunted together. Preston and I hunted in az. and made a trip or two to Mexico and Baja in the late 80"s and early 90's, a very knowledgeable guy. he has a nose for gold.

I agree finding the source pocket/vein of the patch is were the real money is at. many hunters just concentrate on the placers. patches are limited and easily depleted, veins can be extensive. That's why Im always preaching about learning geology. Ray writes some great stuff and I always follow his writings. AzNuggetBob

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cool beans Bob! I'm just facinated by any writings concerning pocket's. After reading Rays approach (several times) to pocket's I can visualize different things much easier. He knocks years off of the learning curve thru his experiences. I enjoyed Preston's writings as well but not as clear to me as Rays. Oh well I hope Bill sees my request. This post is certainly worthy of a pin job.

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I agree Rim, Ray is very good at writing things very clearly something Im still working on. This subject is important. AzNuggetBob

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This is a good backorder issue of icmj about duffy and his pockets.

http://www.icmj

If you look close you can see this article about George Duffy and pocket hunting in ICMJ's magazine was written by none other than Jim Straight. If you go to the top of the main page here on the Gold Nugget Shooting Forum you can find a pinned thread that gives a lot of information on this topic by legendary treasure hunter, gold miner and geologist Jim Straight himself. Jim discusses these type of pocket formations in detail. I highly recommend Jim's books as well. Great reading. AzNuggetBob

Just click on this link.

http://www.nuggetshooter.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=22123

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I also highly recommend you watch this series. you can get a highly documented crash course in geology on the grand scale in a few hours. I agree with about 95% of it. AzNuggetBob

http://www.history.com/shows/how-the-earth-was-made/videos

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bump

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Here is something I thought you may like. AzNuggetBob

http://www.history.com/shows/history-specials/videos/whats-the-earth-worth" />

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