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Here is a good old Lost Dutchman documentary


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  • 2 weeks later...

I still say the "mine" isn't in the Superstitions, but North of there. This is supported by the map I personally saw and conversations i had with the old timers at the Dutch Hunters' Rendevous this past Fall.

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  • 3 weeks later...

What a laugh as Dutchmen was just another thief who highgraded ore from the mine he was foreman at. Reintroduced as the dutchmens mine gold found but modern science proved it was NOT new but stolen through spectrographic analysis as exact same same composition as other mine. Gold has fingerprints in composition and NO 2 example exactly the same unless same same mine-just another higrader story gone mad-John :arrowheadsmiley:

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What a laugh as Dutchmen was just another thief who highgraded ore from the mine he was foreman at. Reintroduced as the dutchmens mine gold found but modern science proved it was NOT new but stolen through spectrographic analysis as exact same same composition as other mine. Gold has fingerprints in composition and NO 2 example exactly the same unless same same mine-just another higrader story gone mad-John :arrowheadsmiley:

That is true or so it is said and the mine was the Vulture Mine in Wickenburg, ah but the romance and love of a good yarn keep the story alive.

There are mines once owned by the ill fated Peralta family a ways South East that the Apache covered and hid after killing most of the miners that were quite rich and worth looking for or so it is said.

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Supposedly some of the Peralta stones have been found,

The "Peralta Stones" are a very interesting find, and, if in fact, they are genuine, could hold the answer to the location of all the Peralta mines in the Superstition Mountains and surrrounding areas. While most people believe there is only one mine, there may be as many as eighteen different mine locations.

The "Peralta Stones" where originally discovered in 1949 (some people claim the discovery was in 1956) by a man who has only been fictiously identified as "Jack" while he was on a summer vaction in Arizona with his family. He had pulled off the highway (only identified as 60-70-80-89 to keep the exact location a secret) so he could get out of his car to get a better look at the Superstitions and hopefully, Weaver's Needle. Leaving his family in the car, he climbed a small hill nearby in an effort to use the higher elevation to get a better view. While on top of this hill he stumbled over a piece of rock slightly exposed in the sand below his feet. Thinking the rock was rather finely shaped, he inspected it closer and ultimately dug it out of the sand. What he had discovered was a rectangular piece of sandstone appearing rock, measuring approximately 17"x 22"x 3" and weighing about 25 pounds. This stone was the "Horse and Priest Map". In 1950 he returned to the same area and located two more stones, plus a smaller heart shaped stone which would fit exactly into the "Heart Map". The third stone located was the "Trail Map".

Without figuring out the clues on the maps, "Jack" died six years later. He had been good friends with Travis Marlowe, so in 1956 Jack's widow gave the stone maps to Marlowe. Marlowe then began many years of research on the stones, succeeding to some extent in locating trail markers and following clues, yet never discovering the actual mine(s). On June 12, 1964 the "Stone Maps" were publicly unveiled (to some extent at least, as certain clues were covered up) when an article was published in Life Magazine regarding the Peralta Stones.

Much has transpired over the years regarding these stones. At some point they were displayed in the Mesa Southwest Museum in Mesa, Arizona. However, litigation ultimately caused the stones to be entrusted to the non-profit A.L. Flagg Foundation, a mineral-oriented organization. In 1996 I was able to locate these stone maps at the Arizona Mining and Mineral Museum in Phoenix, Arizona. They are not on display (or they were not then), and must be asked for if you wish to view them. At the time I viewed them, I was charged $50.00 to photograph them. The following graphics are actual photographs I shot of the stones themselves.

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Yes sir.... I am not sure that is based on fact or BS, but there is some stories out there of mines burried by the Apaches and some were very rich. There is not much at that site but some photos...

Here is some more on that.... http://kryderexplora...Fphotos%2Falbum

or this... http://treasurestori...ltaLostVein.htm

Cool stuff and if I was a treasure hunter it could be fun to hunt for, but those indians were very good at throwing in all the tailings and making a mine disappear.

I am betting there is more fact to this than the Lost Dutchman story.... :inocent:

Thanks for adding the link as it shows the photos mentioned of the stones...

More stuff....

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The late GREAT Karl Von Meuller ,father of modern day treasure hunting, believed in this one and if good enough for him ya'all can bet on it being the real deal-tons a treasure 2 ya 2-John

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