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Camp Cody Messed with my Head.


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Ok, I hunt Camp Cody from time to time. It's just down the road a mile from the house.

Find your basic trash and junk most of the time.

Coins are far and few in between.

I don't think the guys had many to loose.

Friday the 6th of Jan I find this coin. New Mexico's Admission to Union is January 6, 1912!

A 1912 Canadian Silver 5 Cent Peace.

How ta Hell that got to the Tent City is behond me.

Is that some kinda weird Ju Ju, or What?

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Hey, it's silver and it seems to be in great shape, nice find! It's always funny what you can find in the most random of places. Like I posted previously, I found a Colombian Army button from the 1860's here in Fayetteville, N.C. So you never know.

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Ok, I hunt Camp Cody from time to time. It's just down the road a mile from the house.

Find your basic trash and junk most of the time.

Coins are far and few in between.

I don't think the guys had many to loose.

Friday the 6th of Jan I find this coin. New Mexico's Admission to Union is January 6, 1912!

A 1912 Canadian Silver 5 Cent Peace.

How ta Hell that got to the Tent City is behond me.

Is that some kinda weird Ju Ju, or What?

Snowbirds? :rolleyes:

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That is a great find Homefire!

You are right about the coinage...There just wasn't any coinage in this place until the end of the first world war, and what there was was not often misplaced. Businesses accepted currency, gold and silver coin, and gold and silver bullion. Most would probably accept all sorts of barter and trade. Think of how healthy our economy would be if this were the case now! The dollar is now the bottleneck through which all business is conducted in today's world.

My experience is that there is as much Mexican sillver, silver shot, and silver coins from other countries than there is U.S. coinage. Tokens too. There was not enough coin to go around and any ol' silver could be weighed. The vaqueros would hammer mexican coins into conchos after 1846 and spend them on either side of the border. And silver shot or "popcorns" are very common. (that is one good thing about using a gold detector and digging every small target!).

So any piece of silver of known purity was as valuable (or even more so) than a U.S. coin and was probably used as often in transactions.

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That is a great find Homefire!

You are right about the coinage...There just wasn't any coinage in this place until the end of the first world war, and what there was was not often misplaced. Businesses accepted currency, gold and silver coin, and gold and silver bullion. Most would probably accept all sorts of barter and trade. Think of how healthy our economy would be if this were the case now! The dollar is now the bottleneck through which all business is conducted in today's world.

My experience is that there is as much Mexican sillver, silver shot, and silver coins from other countries than there is U.S. coinage. Tokens too. There was not enough coin to go around and any ol' silver could be weighed. The vaqueros would hammer mexican coins into conchos after 1846 and spend them on either side of the border. And silver shot or "popcorns" are very common. (that is one good thing about using a gold detector and digging every small target!).

So any piece of silver of known purity was as valuable (or even more so) than a U.S. coin and was probably used as often in transactions.

This is a great piece of knowledge, and is news to me. Very interesting, I have never heard of silver shot before, unless you count stories of people using silver bullets for werewolves... :)

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I know they would Pop Corn Gold dust to make handling it for transactions much easier.

The Silver makes sense because it would be easier to transact smaller amounts as well.

This coin is really small. Smaller then a US dime.

Supposed to weigh about (I like that, About) 1 gram.

Will check it out when I find were ta hell I put my scale. LOL

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When you watch the panoramic of Camp Cody about 2/3 the way through it you are looking at Cook's Peak in the background. I found a lot of stuff over there at that old town. Most of it is on the Hyatt Ranch.

Many years ago we got permission to go and camp there and we spent many days poking around the old town and graveyards. We found the Chinaman's Laundry right off and found hundreds of buttons and a dozen or so old coins. Even a piece of faceted amber the size of the end of your thumb and a copper Chinese coin with a hole in it.

The story goes that when the Chinaman died a couple of drunks were hired to bury him. Since there were hundreds of abandoned shafts and only one inch to solid bedrock, the drunks decided to put (throw) his body down a shaft and call it good.

A few years later a couple of Chinamen came looking for their countryman to take back his remains. The J.P. told them where to look and the two Chinese started to dig. They exhumed the remains of two cattle along with the bones of the local laundry owner. It seems that over the years there were several things that were buried in that same hole.

That story is in James McKenna's "Black Range Tales". He was the Justice of the Peace in the town of Cook for several years after his mining days ended. That book is published by High Lonesome Books out of Silver City. Get yourself a copy if you don't have one. You can always find one at Sue's Antiques in Hillsboro.

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I'm sure that film was taken from the Water tower. I know about were it was . I just found that Video this week.

The more I see it the more things I need to line up and go hunting.

Using Black Mtn, Cooks Peak and the Rail Road tracks , I've found a few open spots I didn't know was part of the Camp.

The 1918 Spanish Flu messed with the troops more then some others in New Mexico because they had folks coming in on train all the time.

They would take the sick persons property, Tent, Clothes (POCKETS FULL) to the burn pits. Nothing was touched because they didn't want the flu.

They used Pitch Forks and sticks to move it all.

The Burn Pits were mostly down along the River Edge. All the good areas are Posted now days.

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Great find, and I love hearing about all the history.

Paul

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Ya know, it was the same at Ft. Craig up by San Marcial. The horses caught some sort of sickness and they buried them all in a pit with saddles and all the gear. I have a buddy that got very sick digging up the pits and had to be airlifted to Wm. Beaumont in El Paso. He has truckloads of tack, bits, and other gear he was absconding with and if'n he hadn't have been sick he would have got by with it. As it was he barely got out of it with his life (some strange infection on the pericardium of his heart) and had to give up all the loot.

The cactus cops have hounded him for his whole life after that one. He could hardly go camping without a federal chaperone for years.

The same fellow is dying of cancer right now in Las Cruces. Bless your old infected heart Lester!

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That story is in James McKenna's "Black Range Tales". He was the Justice of the Peace in the town of Cook for several years after his mining days ended. That book is published by High Lonesome Books out of Silver City. Get yourself a copy if you don't have one. You can always find one at Sue's Antiques in Hillsboro.

Bob

I have 2 of those books don't know how that happened ,was good reading lots of blood curdling experiences for sure..

Rodd

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That story is in James McKenna's "Black Range Tales". He was the Justice of the Peace in the town of Cook for several years after his mining days ended. That book is published by High Lonesome Books out of Silver City. Get yourself a copy if you don't have one. You can always find one at Sue's Antiques in Hillsboro. Bob I have 2 of those books don't know how that happened ,was good reading lots of blood curdling experiences for sure.. Rodd

There is supposed to be a new book about James McKenna out this year. Several fellows have followed his legend and have put together a story about his life. They were researching a couple of years ago and did some interviews in Hillsboro and Kingston.

There are a couple of very interesting stories in that book. One that put a new twist on the Adam's Diggins and one that is just a trip (the lightning cave story). Both have enough truth to them to make you wonder and both are fantastic enough to...well... make you wonder. Each and every story he writes in that book are the local legends that have been passed down from the old timers.

I know for a fact that the story of the Kingston foot race is true. That there was an anual race where all the fastest runners from near and far would race down Percha Canyon in the only nearly level spot for many miles. And one year a couple of high rollers decided to stack the odds with a ringer and enter a professional athlete form some darn place. And just as he was entering the final stretch ahead of a dozen other contestants, and in full view of a hundred people gathered at the finish line, a grizzly stepped out and grabbed him and ended his race prematurely.

There is a lot of good reading in that book!

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I have learned and enjoyed the history in this post. Well done. I intend to find myself a copy of "Black Range Tales". Sounds like a good read. For you prospectors who are history buff's. Pick up a copy of

S C Gwynne's "Empire of the Summer Moon". The best book on the frontier of the American West I have ever read. Lobo

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Thanks LL! A good read is a fantastic gift to everyone. I have not heard of that one and I will get it.

One of my all time favorite books is Desert Solitaire by Edward Abbey. I bet 90% of everyone here has a copy between a Robert Service and Mark Twain, but it deserves a mention. If'n you haven't read it you need to.

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I have learned and enjoyed the history in this post. Well done. I intend to find myself a copy of "Black Range Tales". Sounds like a good read. For you prospectors who are history buff's. Pick up a copy of S C Gwynne's "Empire of the Summer Moon". The best book on the frontier of the American West I have ever read. Lobo

Hey Lobo

If'n you cant find one I'll sell one of mine for $10.00 + postage

Rodd

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