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What to do if you find a new strewn field?


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Not for sure of I did, but a friend and I have found a tight little area with hundreds of little black rocks that are dense and are quick to attract a magnet. After doing some research on the net, I read that maybe 1% of all specimens are legit, so I'm not getting too excited. Problem is, there are thumbprints and fusion crust on alot of them. I'm guessing we picked well over 30 pounds and there is easily 3 times that left. If by some small chance we did find a new field, what is the proper course of action?

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Aloha,

First of all:heck to see if they really are meteorites. There are several easy ways to make sure they are the "real thing". Go thru all the previous posts by Jim Woodell and you will see the steps you need to take regarding authenticating these rocks. If they turn out to be the real thing then get your *ss in gear and pound that area hard before telling anyone else about this location. Make sure you document all your finds with in situ pics and gps coords for all the spots.

If it were me, I wouldnt tell too many people about this spot until I felt I had picked this spot pretty clean and then and only then I would make an announcement.

Aloha and good luck,

Stan aka Kaimi

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Not for sure of I did, but a friend and I have found a tight little area with hundreds of little black rocks that are dense and are quick to attract a magnet. After doing some research on the net, I read that maybe 1% of all specimens are legit, so I'm not getting too excited. Problem is, there are thumbprints and fusion crust on alot of them. I'm guessing we picked well over 30 pounds and there is easily 3 times that left. If by some small chance we did find a new field, what is the proper course of action?

The experts will determine if you have indeed found a true meteorite, and a new strewnfield.

You see even if after being analyzed by professionals there is the possibility that IF indeed they are meteorites they may be "paired" with another fall/strewnfield some distance away.

I am replying to your questions NOT to your photo. Photos can be deceiving and besides that fact they don't really look like meteorites by the photo. Not to say they aren't .

Do the initial tests that can be researched here on the forum and if they pass them them contact a lab or university and make arrangements to send in a sample, then and only then will you know what you have.

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G'Day Zilla

Mix 'n Match here. Personally, I agree with Ben but I also agree with others on keeping your mouth shut . Release only pertinent information which I think you've done and as for Frank's advice, I agree also. Many meteorites have been dismissed due to poor photography. This is one you should not go on.

A good example is what's happened recently with Cat Mountain. Some specimens were found and addressed as slag but perseverence and scientific analysis have proved positive.

So, read the comments, seek scientific advice... who knows what's next

Cheers, Johnno

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Thanks for the honest replies, its about how we were thinking too. Every stone we streak tested failed, so it was fun to hope we had something special. Kinda caught the bug....I guess it is a good start to buy a few actual meteorites as a control sample first. I can't seem to stay off Craig's list looking for used metal detectors. This is gonna be another expensive hobby, isn't it?

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Thanks for the honest replies, its about how we were thinking too. Every stone we streak tested failed, so it was fun to hope we had something special. Kinda caught the bug....I guess it is a good start to buy a few actual meteorites as a control sample first. I can't seem to stay off Craig's list looking for used metal detectors. This is gonna be another expensive hobby, isn't it?

No not really, you can get yourself a darn good used metal detector (VLF) for a reasonable cost with patience in buying. Do a bit of reading about which ones are suited to meteorite hunting and keep your eyes open. Or if its in your budget a brand new VLF detector can be had around the Christmas season when most dealers have specials running.

A bit of reading (research) is best before you buy so you get what does the job.

Good luck an hapy huntn.

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Not for sure of I did, but a friend and I have found a tight little area with hundreds of little black rocks that are dense and are quick to attract a magnet. After doing some research on the net, I read that maybe 1% of all specimens are legit, so I'm not getting too excited. Problem is, there are thumbprints and fusion crust on alot of them. I'm guessing we picked well over 30 pounds and there is easily 3 times that left. If by some small chance we did find a new field, what is the proper course of action?

With these specimens, I would do some basic rock tests.

1. Magnetic = Yes

2. Window = Any free metal showing?

3. Streak (within the window) = What color??? (Red I am guessing??)

4. Bulk Density = ????

My web page has all sorts of info on how to do this. Once you answer these questions, then it's time to take it to the next level.

I can help with much of this if you need help.

With these stones, I'd take one to a grinder and make a flat spot, I would then do a streak test on that flat spot on a piece of white ceramic and see if a color appears. The ring on the bottom of a white coffee (where it sits on a table)cup is perfect for this. It is unglazed ceramic.

All of this takes less than 10 minutes.

Jim

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I am sure that these rocks are forms of oxidized Iron(either hematite or magnetite) and are therefore most likely terrestrial, but there is the small chance that these rocks are meteorite shale(pieces of oxidized iron from a meteorite). If it is meteorite shale it will most likely be flakey and have a sort of layering to it although this is not always the case. But if you feel really strongly about these rocks you should get them tested, because most of the following tests that you can do at home to identify ordinary meteorites will fail for meteorite shale because meteorite shale is oxidized iron. I wish you the best with these rocks, how awsome would it be to find a new strewn field!? And here are a couple examples of meteorite shale http://meteorite-recovery.tripod.com/2003/jun03.htm http://www.meteorite-times.com/jims-fragments/ravages-of-time/ (I believe meteorite shale is usually a result of large meteorite collisions and in that case the likelyness of finding meteorite shale is rather low)

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From the looks of it you need to find a meteorite first and then worry about what to do when you find a strewn field.

If those were meteorites you would need to get them "classified" which involved divulging your location. If there was a strewn field there you could tell immediately becasue there would be dozens of "meteorite hunters" converge on your coordinates within a week of the time your specimen hit the University. By the time your stone was classified the area within a two mile radius would have been scoured clean of anything. The instant the stone was classified there would be five guys selling specimens on the internet.

The best strategy is to do your best to insure that what you have is indeed a meteorite FIRST. Then if you decide to classify it be very careful about any location information. Only show one rock and give them the coordinates to the closest parking lot becasue they will fill it up with people looking for more meteorites.

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