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Found this today


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Just looking for opinions on this one. 427.5 grams and i can't shake it off my magnet. I've had a lot of earth rocks stick to my magnet, but this one is ridiculous. Found on Soggy Dry Lake just east of Lucerne.

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DJ,

IMHO it doesn't look like a meteorite, but pictures are hard to tell from what is or is not one. Put a window in it and do a streak test on it. To me it looks more like magnetite with a reddish hue. Just my two cents, and that's only worth 1.2 since the gov't has my other .8 worth...Jason ;)

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Thanks Jason, I looked all over the Internet for pictures of magnetite that looked similar to what I have but was not very successful. I will try to put a window in it tomorrow and scratch test it. I kinda thought it wasn't a meteorite when I found it but the more I keep looking at it I just want to know what is is! Thanks for taking a look.

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I had a piece of hematite that look very simaler to this rock, if you want I can send you the pics by email just give me your email adress( so I dont have to resize the photos). I determined it was hematite by doing a streak test, density test, as well as filing a window. The streak came out reddish/black, it was within the average density for hematite (I believe 4-5 g/ml above the density of ordinary condrites and more the density of the rarer meteorites(ha i wish) http://meteorites.wustl.edu/id/density.htm), and when I filed it showed a consitent shiney dark silver(what polished hematite looks like). I aslo had a piece of magnetite that had simaler results. The reason magnetite and hematite stick so well to magnets is that they are forms of oxidized iron(used as iron ore) that come from deep within the earth, usually as a result of volcanic activity. I'm not sure your rock is magnetite or hematite, but it is a strong possibilty, man those rocks are freaking tricky. Hopfully after you do the test it turns out to be a meteorite, but it doesnt hurt to learn from a meteorwrong, haha I have learned from MANY.

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Well! I think I just discovered an easy way to determine if its hematite. I was reading about hematite and discovered that it is very brittle, so I decided to whack it with a hammer and sure enough it split right in two. No chondrules, just flakey blue/black powdery stuff. Not very scientific but did the job! :grr01:

Thanks for the replies.

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Yes, you determined that it breaks...during the gold rush to California there was a myth that diamonds would not break if hit with a hammer...no one will ever know how many fine diamonds were destroyed...

you could have ruined a rare meteorite...there are good reasons for the various not-too-detructive tests...

fred

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Hi Fred, I didn't mean to upset anyone but after quite a bit of research I was pretty sure it wasn't a meteorite. The area where I found it is near the old bessemer (iron ore) mine, there is also a lot of volcanic rock in the area. I may have put a little much on it when I said I whacked it with a hammer. It had a crack in it already and only took a tap or two and I was able to literally pull it apart with my hands. Sorry if I made it sound like I smashed it with a sledge hammer. Thank you for your input and I'll try to be less destructive in the future. :-)

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G'Day Fred and Roy

Pretty rough way to go Roy. And Fred, you threw me in the Tardis and took me back in time. Many, many years ago when geology was my prime objective, gold was on that list but meteorites hadn't been attempted. Living in Milawa, I decided to investigate Beechworth Gold Fields. It was subject to a lot of dredges, one still remains there. Internet wasn't available, was mainly a trip to the library or chat with a local. But a similar situation happened and I quote not with 100% accuracy.

But the story goes that possibly some dredges had hit an ancient blue pipe or possibly that pipe existed up stream, who knows. A lot of water worn quartz crystal was thrown back into the river either from sluice boxes, panning or dredging. But these turned out to be diamonds. History from the old prospectors say they sometimes came the size of a golf ball or a chook's egg.

http://www.dpcd.vic.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0009/44595/Beechworth.pdf

Thanks for the memories Fred. And Roy, don't be so brutal. I don't think you upset any body, I think we all have thick skins here but knowledge is golden and you will get it here. Just ask questions.

Cheers

Johnno

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