Jump to content
Nugget Shooter Forums
Sign in to follow this  
idrissleroy

Metal detecting and lightning strikes

Recommended Posts

Hi guys

I'm new to metal detecting and i've read quite a lot about it on various forums but never found any topic about metal detecting and lightning strikes. May be am i worrying for nothing but I would like to metal detect during the rainy season and here's my question: is there no risk of lightning strikes to use a metal detector in rainy weather? Is VLF or PI safer? Any informations or links will be highly appreciated. Thanks

IL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi guys

I'm new to metal detecting and i've read quite a lot about it on various forums but never found any topic about metal detecting and lightning strikes. May be am i worrying for nothing but I would like to metal detect during the rainy season and here's my question: is there no risk of lightning strikes to use a metal detector in rainy weather? Is VLF or PI safer? Any informations or links will be highly appreciated. Thanks

IL

Only worry about lightning when there is thunder or lightning. Having a metal detector in your hand doesn't matter one bit. Elevation on the other hand, or just standing there watching the light show.. :inocent: :yuk-yuk: :thumbsupanim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are detecting in open fields and a T-storm blows in, odds are you would be heading for the car before the rain arrived. Best suggestion is don't walk in a lightning storm with the detector propped over your shoulder or held up in the air. Lightning usually takes the fastest way to ground...just make sure that's not through you.. bur2.gif

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When metal detecting you will hear the lightening in your headset....it's very pronounced spikes

of sound...that's when it's time to turn that detector off and get in the car and go home or at

least sit it out....

About five years ago I was in an area that had produced a couple of good nuggets so I didn't pay

any attention to the lightening in my headset...I should have...when I came to I was still standing

in one spot and not moving...just like a statute...then I realized what had happened by the terrible

headache...man did it ever hurt...I think it entered my head through the earphones....also hurt was

my shoulders....elbows....hips and knees....

So now when I hear the first spike in the earphones it's turn off the detector and go to the truck....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yesterday we were prospecting a dry wash below an watertank and discovered a bush that was burnt to the roots, the bushes around and near it were not burnt. It had to be a lighting strike. Would that be a good spot for a metal detector? Maybe something under the bush has metal that attracted the lighting strike.

My son and I are drywashing and camping out here in the southern Mojave, enjoying every minute of it, not much gold yet, its here but still searching.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yesterday we were prospecting a dry wash below an watertank and discovered a bush that was burnt to the roots, the bushes around and near it were not burnt. It had to be a lighting strike. Would that be a good spot for a metal detector? Maybe something under the bush has metal that attracted the lighting strike.

I was witness to lightning striking one of our bushes. It wasn't burnt or anything, but was dried out as if every last bit of moisture was totally sucked out of it. When I went to pull it out of the ground, right below the roots was a chunk of angle iron that was buried when they built the house. I'm guessing that is what attracted the lighting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Specialized beach detectors are not harmed by moisture, but most other types do not like it if the control box gets too wet. As Dizzy points out, we generally are inside somewhere out of the rain rather quickly with our detectors and that is when most lightning strikes occur. i haven't heard of many detectorists getting zapped -- but, like snake bite or poison oak, it can happen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was witness to lightning striking one of our bushes. It wasn't burnt or anything, but was dried out as if every last bit of moisture was totally sucked out of it. When I went to pull it out of the ground, right below the roots was a chunk of angle iron that was buried when they built the house. I'm guessing that is what attracted the lighting.

I wonder if a fulgurite was formed in that instance. :hmmmmm: You'd probably never find it now but that's something else to look for when out in the field. Much easier to find in the sand dunes though.

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had some component blow in my Garret Deepseeker, by static caused by a thunderstorm many miles away from where I was detecting. Do some research, the electrical discharge can occur miles from the thunderstorm...

fred

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yesterday we were prospecting a dry wash below an watertank and discovered a bush that was burnt to the roots, the bushes around and near it were not burnt. It had to be a lighting strike. Would that be a good spot for a metal detector? Maybe something under the bush has metal that attracted the lighting strike.

My son and I are drywashing and camping out here in the southern Mojave, enjoying every minute of it, not much gold yet, its here but still searching.

Metal detect the burnt bush yes....like they say lightening don't strike twice in the same place...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Specialized beach detectors are not harmed by moisture, but most other types do not like it if the control box gets too wet. As Dizzy points out, we generally are inside somewhere out of the rain rather quickly with our detectors and that is when most lightning strikes occur. i haven't heard of many detectorists getting zapped -- but, like snake bite or poison oak, it can happen.

AMEN TO THAT MARTIN....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Goldfinger... Yep, Fulgarites can be long and twisty if in the sand.

Back in 1994 pocket miner George Duffy (Lovelock, Nevada) brought it to my attenton that lighening strikes hitting the ground in a metallifeous area could indicate a possible mineral deposit if conditions were just right; similar to a grounding rod.

George is a highly successful pocker miner and has found over 100 pockets; the largest was over 40 ounces (Ref. Picks & Pans~~ICMJ Vol. 74, No 1, September 2004.)... :olddude: js

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back in the day(late 70's-early 80's)I always did much better finding coins when the weather was very erratic..kind of scary though.This was with a Compass 59B and 94B detectors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Being a dedicated dredger I never come in outta any rain/lightning ever as being wet is natural for me. When the man upstairs says time to go that sounds like a quick way to go. Fatalistic yes always :twocents: John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was wading in Elephant Butte lake and the lightning started to fly.

About the time I was moving toward the shore, A bolt hit the other end of the lake.

I wouldn't have thought it would knocked me around as good as it did.

I'm sure some fish died that day.

Wonder what that would would had done to a PI detector in the water?

Toast the Front end?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We should start a lighting strike club. I was hit camping near Hershey park in the 70's

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We should start a lighting strike club. I was hit camping near Hershey park in the 70's

OK, this explains the Electric atmosphere around here! :thumbsupanim :yuk-yuk:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, this explains the Electric atmosphere around here! :thumbsupanim :yuk-yuk:

:hahaha: :whoope: :hahaha: :whoope: :lol: :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...