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Need some help identifying this possible meteorite


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Hi all,

A young lady that is a member of my astronomy site needs some help in identifying this stone

she found while on a geological trip to an area she is studying.

She is a university student in Romania, and is very sharp. She reads and writes English

better than most of us do, and a mixture of us old farts from around the globe have sorta

taken her under our wing. I can see her with a Ph.D in Astro-physics in the future, and is

attending the university under a scholarship. (I don't think she's ever had a grade under an

"A")

To make a long story shorter, she is studying a "quay" in Romania, and her assignment is to

determine the origin's of the area and how it was formed. While on a recent trip there she

found a stone she believes is a meteorite, and that perhaps it was part of a larger

meteorite that cratered the area long ago.

I sent her the links posted by Desertsunburn, and she has been able to get some info via

those tests. She is hungry for more info to either determine if this is a meteorite or a

meteorwrong. I have her permission to post the pics she has taken, including ones of a

polished "window" that were taken under a microscope.

Here are her recent comments about the stone:

"So far, my geology teacher told me it looks like MOLTEN METAL but she

isn't sure about the tiny drops of minerals caught inside the mass. Further study is needed

to identify (if possible) what they are. So far so good.

NOTE : a 100% sure confirmation can only be made at a specialized institute. This means I

have to send the meteorite fragment 600 km away for a complete chemical analysis.

The other two fragments gave me quite a surprise! They contain unusually high contents of

metal. The Geology teachers say they've seen nothing like this before.

Metal is fairly common in andesite due to hidrothermal activity (when hot water near the

lava chamber rises taking with it all sorts of minerals and depositing them on already

solidified rocks) but the metallic elements are really really tiny and in a very small

amount.

This andesite contains a ridiculously high amount of metal and oxides. On top of that, the

metallic elements are visible with the naked eye

This proves that the andesite there mixed with material from the meteorite. "

Here are a few pics, and she would welcome any comments or help:

It came from this area: (Dora is sitting on the rocks)

DSCF0134.jpg

As she found it: DSCF0151.jpg

Microscopic images:

DSCF0377.jpg

DSCF0388.jpg

She's hungry to learn more about it, and whether it is a meteorite or not she would be

thrilled with any help you experienced meteorite hunters could offer.

Mike

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I asked her a few questions and here is some add'l info:

"It's pretty much confirmed. My rock is made out of metal, it's radioactive, magnetic, heavy and I found it where I concluded that the meteorite had its first contact with the ground. All the elements needed to identify a meteorite fragment without a chemical test and destroying it in the process are there.

Not only that but I also found a rock that is called "impact breccia" which is exclusively found near meteorite impacts.

I've managed to see it closer only today. Magnified, I could clearly see metal in the rock's structure. Also, it contains many crystals and it is highly mineralized which only proves that the andesite there was altered by shock and heat, far more powerful than a volcanic eruption

Even without the fragment and the breccia rocks, the evidence on the field fully support my theory. I visited the site with the teacher who helps me, which also happens to be respected geomorphology teacher and he pointed out the elements that show evidence of an impact.

It's going to be tricky though. We concluded that the event is very old and most of the structures of the crater are gone. This and the fact that the meteorite hit at a small angle, under 30 degrees."

Mike

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I asked her a few questions and here is some add'l info:

Hi Dizzy,

I would like to see a macro picture of the window. Not a microscopic view. So far, I have not seen what I need to convince me. Meteorites are not radio active as she stated. Some earthly condition may have made them that way, however. If they are convinced it's a meteorite, as it appears, she does not need to write a thesis about it for us, only provide the results of the tests she performed that brought them to the conclusion that it's a meteorite.

A suggestion is to only talk about one specimen at a time to reduce the confusion factor.

Magnetic = yes

Specific Gravity / Density = ??

Chondrules = ?? (note; may not have any)

Metal flakes/free metal = ??

Strike/streak test Color = ??

If all these are positive, she might have a meteorite. The next step is to perform a nickel test. They can do this in a non destructive manor by finding someone with an XRF machine. Blaine Reed comes to mind. It sounds as if they may be at this point. A test can be arranged.

The final step is as she stated...a qualified institution would have to test and classify the stone. Her teachers (school) should be able to arrange that way easier than she or any single person could. Normally a test sample is 20 grams or 20% of the specimen but it's often best to talk to the classifying institution as to what they want prior to sending anything.

Off to a hunt!

JIm

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The basics of meteorite identifiction have not yet been done. Things like foliation, vessicules, quartz inclusions, and the identification of the "metal" she sees in the specimen. Only nickel/iron counts.

I agree with the leathery one yet again! A peek at a window without the magnification is the best identifier that anyone could use.

I am skeptical about the looks of the larger rock, and the smaller pieces certainly look like an iron rich basalt. But if a window shows ELEMENTAL IRON then there is nothing to talk about except where to get a proper analysis done.

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The basics of meteorite identifiction have not yet been done. Things like foliation, vessicules, quartz inclusions, and the identification of the "metal" she sees in the specimen. Only nickel/iron counts.

I agree with the leathery one yet again! A peek at a window without the magnification is the best identifier that anyone could use.

I am skeptical about the looks of the larger rock, and the smaller pieces certainly look like an iron rich basalt. But if a window shows ELEMENTAL IRON then there is nothing to talk about except where to get a proper analysis done.

Hi Bob!

Ya know...while I was out today...I thought of your picture of you holding that jug of water! Sure would have been nice to poor that jug of water over me about 10 times!

Jim

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Hi Bob!

Ya know...while I was out today...I thought of your picture of you holding that jug of water! Sure would have been nice to poor that jug of water over me about 10 times!

Jim

Isn't it funny about those things you remember when you are out stumbling around?

I bet it is getting hot down your way. It is still brisk in the mornings up here... Jacket weather until 8:00 or so. I am headed down into the desert on a search this weekend and I will be working on that cowboy tan a little myself. At some point I am sure I will do one of those "flash memory moments" on your video where you cut the window in the specimen from the passenger side of your rig.

Keep on rockin'! I hope you find a pallasite as big as your head out there!

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Hi Mike,

The rocks in the picture on top of which the young lady is sitting remind me of the basalt rock cliffs of Pullman, Washington State.

Hi all,

A young lady that is a member of my astronomy site needs some help in identifying this stone

she found while on a geological trip to an area she is studying.

She is a university student in Romania, and is very sharp. She reads and writes English

better than most of us do, and a mixture of us old farts from around the globe have sorta

taken her under our wing. I can see her with a Ph.D in Astro-physics in the future, and is

attending the university under a scholarship. (I don't think she's ever had a grade under an

"A")

To make a long story shorter, she is studying a "quay" in Romania, and her assignment is to

determine the origin's of the area and how it was formed. While on a recent trip there she

found a stone she believes is a meteorite, and that perhaps it was part of a larger

meteorite that cratered the area long ago.

I sent her the links posted by Desertsunburn, and she has been able to get some info via

those tests. She is hungry for more info to either determine if this is a meteorite or a

meteorwrong. I have her permission to post the pics she has taken, including ones of a

polished "window" that were taken under a microscope.

Here are her recent comments about the stone:

"So far, my geology teacher told me it looks like MOLTEN METAL but she

isn't sure about the tiny drops of minerals caught inside the mass. Further study is needed

to identify (if possible) what they are. So far so good.

NOTE : a 100% sure confirmation can only be made at a specialized institute. This means I

have to send the meteorite fragment 600 km away for a complete chemical analysis.

The other two fragments gave me quite a surprise! They contain unusually high contents of

metal. The Geology teachers say they've seen nothing like this before.

Metal is fairly common in andesite due to hidrothermal activity (when hot water near the

lava chamber rises taking with it all sorts of minerals and depositing them on already

solidified rocks) but the metallic elements are really really tiny and in a very small

amount.

This andesite contains a ridiculously high amount of metal and oxides. On top of that, the

metallic elements are visible with the naked eye

This proves that the andesite there mixed with material from the meteorite. "

Here are a few pics, and she would welcome any comments or help:

It came from this area: (Dora is sitting on the rocks)

DSCF0134.jpg

As she found it: DSCF0151.jpg

Microscopic images:

DSCF0377.jpg

DSCF0388.jpg

She's hungry to learn more about it, and whether it is a meteorite or not she would be

thrilled with any help you experienced meteorite hunters could offer.

Mike

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Hi Mike,

The rocks in the picture on top of which the young lady is sitting remind me of the basalt rock cliffs of Pullman, Washington State.

Wow...never thought of it, but having spent some time in the palouse (and now that you brought it up) I can certainly see the resemblance!

I can assure you though that she is in Romania. I was hoping that Dora would join up here so she could share info directly, as this is a very important issue for her right now.

Mike

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  • 2 weeks later...

I can see that you've been there too Mike! It is so much like Pullman where I did my high school!

Wow...never thought of it, but having spent some time in the palouse (and now that you brought it up) I can certainly see the resemblance!

I can assure you though that she is in Romania. I was hoping that Dora would join up here so she could share info directly, as this is a very important issue for her right now.

Mike

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I can see that you've been there too Mike! It is so much like Pullman where I did my high

school!

One of my best customers is in Pullman, and I have several more in Spokane. I used to drive

over about 3 times a year, and then leave Pullman and run down to Hwy 14 to go back through

Portland.

So, you went to high school near [what I am told by grads] is the center of the known

universe? I can not imagine what the Sat. night were like when you were a teen. Some guys

have all the luck. :wubu:

Mike

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