Jump to content
Nugget Shooter Forums
FlakMagnet

Bob, 29Prospector has moved on

Recommended Posts

I'm too new to have known Bob, but after reading all of your comments it is clear that he was a grand friend to many good people. RIP Bob, and since a good story is always welcome I'll be looking for that dust cloud from your dry washer when I travel the same trail.

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is sad, another old timer!! Rest in PEACE!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to hear of Bob's passing . I was lucky enough to spend some time out at the Dale and to eat some of his tasty chili on a cold windy night around the camp fire .

Thanks for the memories Bob and you will be missed.

God Speed !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rest in peace Bob. It was great to know you and hear your stories, I know when I'm drywashing in the DALE with probably the last drywasher you made that you'll be watching over my shoulder. My condolances to your family.

Terry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first time I met Bob in person was at the If I Can claim out in the Dale. Being more of a greenhorn then than I am now I asked Bob about dry washing, where gold collects and why, and how to put those two things together. Bob gave me an education that I still think about today and will forever refer back to.

He had such a history full of stories of the old timers, treasures found, lost, and taken away. His insights were so crystal clear it made you wonder why you never saw it yourself. The thing Bob shared with me I think about the most, and that he got from his father, was to just sit down and look. Understanding what you are seeing, and then look some more to pick out the details you missed. Then look some more. Then go dig up the gold.

Bob's spirit was huge. Many days we sat on his back patio building drywashers and talking about life, and his ethics and whole-hearted good nature always left me feeling stonger and in a better understanding of life. Being around Bob made me feel at peace.

Read through the books he wrote and you'll get a small sampling of who he was and how big a part gold played in his life. Not just gold, but history. Living history. He grew up around the real old timers and reveled in sharing that experience and the times I found myself out in the Dale on my own I played through all his stories and looked the hills and wondered how many times Bob or his dad had climbed a certain peak and what stories they had to share about it. Bob and the Dale were one and the same. Bob has rocks in his front yard and each one has a story. From the ones pulled from hard rock mines deep below the surface to ones with sea shells he found on the top of mountains, each one had a tale.

I'm really going to miss Bob. I'll always carry a piece of him with me, and every time I hear a dry washer or drive down a dusty dirt road Bob will be at my side telling me to stop and look. And to be at peace.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My thoughts and prayers go out to Bob and his Family, and all of you here that knew and admired him. Rest in peace Bob, I know you have finally found your richest treasure. - T

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

R.I.P. Bob.... You are missed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RIP ol'sod, minin' full time now--John :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is really some tough news to take in, and as with most of you i too was looking forward to meeting Bob.

@~)~~ R.I.P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I only talked with Bob by E-mail about drywashers. He freely gave me his knowledge and I guess a little of himself about drywashers. I feel I will have a little of him with me always. He had the sprit of the true old west prospector and shared it with every person he met. The world seems a little smaller without Bob, he will be missed. Thanks Bob for sharing.

CH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Only got to talk to bob a few times via email, what a nice guy he was. I really enjoyed reading his forum posts. He will surely be missed. Dave.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was looking forward to hearing his new mining exploits as he was healing so well. I'm sure God gave him a merciful deal he couldn't refuse, rest in peace Bob. I remember I once lamented on my facebook page that it seemed whenever I posted something about politics or religion I would lose "friends". Bob was one of the first to say that didn't bother him, even though we were probably often at odds if you only looked at things as they relate to politics. What a good guy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Bob has rocks in his front yard and each one has a story. From the ones pulled from hard rock mines deep below the surface to ones with sea shells he found on the top of mountains, each one had a tale."

I had the pleasure of standing in Bob's yard and hearing stories about those rocks. I asked for some help on the forums and Bob sent me his phone number. I talked to him a few times and took the family for a drive out to meet him. He told me lots of things and sent me home with a detector coil to try on my cheapo detector. He also sent my daughters home with several rocks and told me at a later time that he had some rocks set aside just for them. I regret not getting out there to collect those and chat with him again. I sure hope he thought of us all fondly in his final days. I hope his family get's all the comfort they deserve.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

omg i just talked to bob a few days before christmas hoping to get together with him sometime. i met bob at the first pcsc meeting i went to and i believe we both joined that night and he was the guest speaker, dang bob was such a nice man, the type that made u feel like you have been friends forever even after only meeting him face to face once. he was a fountain of knowledge in his field and his stories, man not since reading louis lmour books have i ever enjoyed his style of writing. i will miss him. to me he is a legend. when u know nothing about prospecting like myself when we met, i thought of him as the coolest thing since sliced bread because this guy was the real deal. a true prospector and miner. i'm sure we will still get together sometime bob,without the pain and suffering. love u bro. my condolences to the family and the grandkids that he loved and talked so much about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never met Bob but wish I did. What a loss. I give my condolences to his family and friends. R.I.P.

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Bob knew every square inch of the Dale and could tell you about it. Even when his back was so bad he couldn't get out of his truck, I watched him pull up to an ore pile in the Dale, open the door, lean out and pick up a gold bearing piece of quartz. He was definitely a miner at heart and not satisfied staying in the city. He freely shared his knowledge and was a good friend. I even named my dog Dunkin which Bob got a big kick out of. (It was a little confusing at outings when I would yell "Dunkin get over here!")

I will miss him greatly.

Lucky Joe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I first met Bob at a outing in Gold Basin a few years back. When he found out that I liked to whittle out Diamond Willow walking sticks,he asked me to make him one. Bob said to make it big as he put alot of weight on it.I found the right peice of Diamond Willow the next summer in Mt. and I gave it to Bob when i visited him at his home in 29 palms the following winter. Bob led the way the next day to Maureen and My first visit to the Dale.We camped for three days and Bob would stop by each and fill us in the History of the area.It was really quiet thrill to hear his early mining experiences with his Dad.

Great prospectors like Bob will be missed but his stories will be with us forever.

RIP My good friend. I will catch up with you later.

Harry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple of random rememberances of Bob;

One time he, Dennis and I drove out into the Dale south of what they call 'The Zoo'.

The wind was howling a steady honest-to-God 40 to 50 miles an hour.

Bob shouted at us over the din "It's not the heat that gets you out here, it's the wind that drives you crazy"

We laughed much of the way out at how insane and how far gone you had to be to even

be out there much less try to detect, but that is what we were going out there to do, detect.

We pulled over to the side of the dirt track we had followed.

Dennis and I piled out of the truck.

We pulled on our harnesses and turned the detectors on.

The gusts were buffeting me around so hard I could not stand in one place

I was literally being shoved down the side of the road.

I finally got everything together and stood a moment leaning at a cartoonish angle against the wall of wind.

I could see Dennis hurrying down a steep draw, anxious to take cover,

but Bob was still in the truck.

I struggled up beside the passenger window and motioned for him to come out,

he nodded and mouthed wordlessly 'in a few minutes.'

I left him and walked onto a hillside adjacent to the truck and tried to tune the detector.

Headphones were no match for the shrill pitch of the wind and after awhile I just stood there being smacked around.

I turned to see if Bob had gotten out and to my shock saw him, half in- half out of the truck,

pinned vise-like against the side by the passenger door which was broadside to the gale force wind.

The door had caught him off balance as he was climbing out and he couldn't get enough leverage to push it off him.

He told us later that he just relaxed and waited until one of us saw him and came to the rescue.

We laughed about that for years...

Another time - still in the Dale of course,

he talked four of us into taking a particularly treacherous and out-of-date "road" down into a canyon in the southern Pinto's.

There was an old mine in there that he had wanted to check out for years.

He lured us with the promise that it was probably going to be a virgin detecting spot too because hardly anyone knew this place even existed.

Of course we took the bait.

We loaded up and headed out in three vehicles from our camp at the old general store.

The road was literally hair-raising.

Even a quad would have had some difficulty.

I sat beside Bob in his beat-up Toyota trying to look casual as we bucked and bumped our way down this endless death wish of a road.

He chatted away happily about various sights and oddities we passed seemingly unaware of the sheer drop-off just outside the passenger window.

We arrived engulfed in Bob's signature cloud of dust and stood for a few minutes getting our bearings.

I was mainly trying not to think about the fact that we had to go up that same road on the way out.

The whole old mine property was hidden in a small bowl in the hills.

It was almost completely strewn with metallic trash.

Bob, who could still get around pretty well then, was scooting around an old building site

excitedly oohing and ahing at a large mound of what you and I would call junk.

To him it was mining equipment and deserved close attention, even respect and perhaps (later of course when there were funds available),

a measure of salvage.

Our detectors wouldn't tune in the sea of metalic ruin.

I was a touch put off being brought all this way on slightly questionable pretenses at considerable risk to life and limb

until I took a moment to watch Bob as he zig-zagged around the property

stopping here to peer into an old adit, stooping over some unrecognisable piece of equipment for a closer look.

Here he was on a journey with friends, in the mountains he loved, picking over the remains of a hardrock mine that in his eyes still had potential.

He was in heaven.

We glanced at each other and smiled as we leaned against our useless detectors

listening to the excitement in his voice as he zoomed around in the late afternoon light.

It was impossible not to feel his happiness.

This beautiful optimistic vision of what was possible just over that next rise in the mountains

is perhaps what endeared him to me most of all.

When people like Bob pass from our sight

it seems some of our dreams go with them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great Story Flak,

Sorry to hear of Bob's passing. I had some good adventures with Bob. Bob was a great story teller and had a real knack for putting a smile on your face and making you laugh. I learned much about the Dale area from him and really enjoyed the time we spent prospecting together. And if that wasn't enough, the man made a dang good bowl of Chili Verde. R.I.P. Amigo

mick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had gotten Bob's writings "Reflections", enjoyed it very much......He will be truely missed.

wonderer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is always a great loss when a mining icon passes. I have chated with Bob on more than a few occasions and he really wanted to teach me the finer points of drywashing. I'm sad I never really met him in person and had a chance to soak up some of his knowledge. RIP Bob, no more pain!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple of random rememberances of Bob;

One time he, Dennis and I drove out into the Dale south of what they call 'The Zoo'.

The wind was howling a steady honest-to-God 40 to 50 miles an hour.

Bob shouted at us over the din "It's not the heat that gets you out here, it's the wind that drives you crazy"

We laughed much of the way out at how insane and how far gone you had to be to even

be out there much less try to detect, but that is what we were going out there to do, detect.

We pulled over to the side of the dirt track we had followed.

Dennis and I piled out of the truck.

We pulled on our harnesses and turned the detectors on.

The gusts were buffeting me around so hard I could not stand in one place

I was literally being shoved down the side of the road.

I finally got everything together and stood a moment leaning at a cartoonish angle against the wall of wind.

I could see Dennis hurrying down a steep draw, anxious to take cover,

but Bob was still in the truck.

I struggled up beside the passenger window and motioned for him to come out,

he nodded and mouthed wordlessly 'in a few minutes.'

I left him and walked onto a hillside adjacent to the truck and tried to tune the detector.

Headphones were no match for the shrill pitch of the wind and after awhile I just stood there being smacked around.

I turned to see if Bob had gotten out and to my shock saw him, half in- half out of the truck,

pinned vise-like against the side by the passenger door which was broadside to the gale force wind.

The door had caught him off balance as he was climbing out and he couldn't get enough leverage to push it off him.

He told us later that he just relaxed and waited until one of us saw him and came to the rescue.

We laughed about that for years...

Another time - still in the Dale of course,

he talked four of us into taking a particularly treacherous and out-of-date "road" down into a canyon in the southern Pinto's.

There was an old mine in there that he had wanted to check out for years.

He lured us with the promise that it was probably going to be a virgin detecting spot too because hardly anyone knew this place even existed.

Of course we took the bait.

We loaded up and headed out in three vehicles from our camp at the old general store.

The road was literally hair-raising.

Even a quad would have had some difficulty.

I sat beside Bob in his beat-up Toyota trying to look casual as we bucked and bumped our way down this endless death wish of a road.

He chatted away happily about various sights and oddities we passed seemingly unaware of the sheer drop-off just outside the passenger window.

We arrived engulfed in Bob's signature cloud of dust and stood for a few minutes getting our bearings.

I was mainly trying not to think about the fact that we had to go up that same road on the way out.

The whole old mine property was hidden in a small bowl in the hills.

It was almost completely strewn with metallic trash.

Bob, who could still get around pretty well then, was scooting around an old building site

excitedly oohing and ahing at a large mound of what you and I would call junk.

To him it was mining equipment and deserved close attention, even respect and perhaps (later of course when there were funds available),

a measure of salvage.

Our detectors wouldn't tune in the sea of metalic ruin.

I was a touch put off being brought all this way on slightly questionable pretenses at considerable risk to life and limb

until I took a moment to watch Bob as he zig-zagged around the property

stopping here to peer into an old adit, stooping over some unrecognisable piece of equipment for a closer look.

Here he was on a journey with friends, in the mountains he loved, picking over the remains of a hardrock mine that in his eyes still had potential.

He was in heaven.

We glanced at each other and smiled as we leaned against our useless detectors

listening to the excitement in his voice as he zoomed around in the late afternoon light.

It was impossible not to feel his happiness.

This beautiful optimistic vision of what was possible just over that next rise in the mountains

is perhaps what endeared him to me most of all.

When people like Bob pass from our sight

it seems some of our dreams go with them.

This is my kinda guy....

I really wish i got to know him myself. I think it's great to be remembered so fondly among your peers.

I'm very sorry for those of you who knew him well and lost a valuable friend. Although, you are better off than those of who didn't get that opportunity. However, I am happy for 29 who now enjoys being pain free and blissful in the presence of our Lord, our Creator. -sport

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×