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Willy Bayot

Powerful Meteorite Detecting tool

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Hi Willy,

I use a 71Khz VLF. I do not use a PI so someone else may answer your question there. I think all that hunt this area are troubled by hot rocks. They can almost be overwhelming at times and are for some folks. I kind of "broke-in" hunting meteorites there and would probably think something broke if I did not hear hot rocks at least every 12 inches!happy0193[1].gif

I think this test...is a true final test. This is a real field condition no one can change. As stated, many of them will stick to a magnet.

Some of them, particularly in Gold Basin, will stick better than a meteorite...as in magnetite. One of my videos on youtube shows where I can not shake the stone from my magnet!

Jim

If the conditions are that bad with hot rocks in your places, I can only repeat what I already said.

A magnetometer will not 'scream' at all at highly mineralized rocks but it will detect any rock containing magnetite.

It will also detect Chondrites much easier than PI because of their Nickel contents.

However, unlike VLF or PI, a mag will not react to any non-magnetic material.

So, the only thing I could promise you is that a mag will also make false detections as you get now and have you dig many times for nothing, except that it will detect those false targets DEEPER :angry:

So, you will continue to dig a lot of 'junks' but, if there are some deep actual meteorites which were missed by previous VLF or PI surveys, you will get them.

Willy

,

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Interesting thread.

Got to thinking about this whole issue, and am wondering if there is any other element that is common to most all meteorites but isn't found in hot rocks? If there is such an element, the question becomes one of finding a notch-filter for that specific mineral signature or response from the coil.

I have no doubt that Minelab and every other detector manufacturer has pondered this very same question. Still, worth considering if we can put a notch in a receiver that rejects all but a specific freq. response to an element that is unique to meteorites (if such a critter indeed exists). IIRC, thix is the same process that was used to develop the discrimination circuitry that is used today.

If meteorites are simply overabundant in some elements and lacking in others, then odds are I have a bad idea. :nutty:

Mike

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Interesting thread.

Got to thinking about this whole issue, and am wondering if there is any other element that is common to most all meteorites but isn't found in hot rocks? If there is such an element, the question becomes one of finding a notch-filter for that specific mineral signature or response from the coil.

I have no doubt that Minelab and every other detector manufacturer has pondered this very same question. Still, worth considering if we can put a notch in a receiver that rejects all but a specific freq. response to an element that is unique to meteorites (if such a critter indeed exists). IIRC, thix is the same process that was used to develop the discrimination circuitry that is used today.

If meteorites are simply overabundant in some elements and lacking in others, then odds are I have a bad idea. :nutty:

Mike

The main element that is common on most 'detectable' meteorites is the Nickel.

The main problem is that there are a lot of different types of 'hot rocks' with various metallic components.

The regular volcanic granite types are easy to manage but the ones containing various percentages of magnetite are not easy preys since they are 'seen' by all types of detectors, including magnetometers.

Actually, there are surely as many different types of hot rocks as there are types of meteorites. The 'only' difference is that the hot rocks are of volcanic origin instead of coming from the skies.

Thus, there is no sure way to distinguish them from the meteorites and any filtering would not be effective. Any strong filtering could even suppress the detection of real meteorites as when you set a too narrow discrimination filter on a metal detector having you just 'missing' real targets.

Willy

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Thus, there is no sure way to distinguish them from the meteorites and any filtering would not be effective. Any strong filtering could even suppress the detection of real meteorites as when you set a too narrow discrimination filter on a metal detector having you just 'missing' real targets.

Willy

sSig_aaarggh.gif

That's what I was afraid of, but had ask the question. Thank you Willy for taking the time to explain it.

Mike

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Also remember that some "Hot Rocks" are not hot rocks anymore when removed from the matrix your detector is balanced to... Many hot rocks are only hot because they are so different from the ground you are hunting and being balanced to that soil matrix "mix" when you come across a rock that is of a much different make up it can give a signal "hot" like a target or "cold" that annoying boing sound, this is with a VLF mostly as the newer PI detectors like the GPX-5000 ignore most "hot rocks" including many of the Basalts that used to drive us nuts due to how pulse induction "sees" the soil.

This is an interesting thread... :hmmmmm:

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