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Hello

im new here and i just wanted to know where a good place is to hunt for meteorites , we are gonna move to saskatchewan prairies , its a semi-arid there , and the farmer who we know has lots of farming and grazing land for me to hunt on im planning to build a large search coil that i can pull on a pvc sled.

so i guess my question is is it best to hunt on grazing or farming land , and im not going on any strewn field just going out to look for them and hopefully get lucky :thumbsupanim

and what are the odds that there is meteorites on that field like per sq mile .

im planing to grid it very carefully , and search through the farmers rock piles. thanks :)

Ruan

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Hello

im new here and i just wanted to know where a good place is to hunt for meteorites , we are gonna move to saskatchewan prairies , its a semi-arid there , and the farmer who we know has lots of farming and grazing land for me to hunt on im planning to build a large search coil that i can pull on a pvc sled.

so i guess my question is is it best to hunt on grazing or farming land , and im not going on any strewn field just going out to look for them and hopefully get lucky :thumbsupanim

and what are the odds that there is meteorites on that field like per sq mile .

im planing to grid it very carefully , and search through the farmers rock piles. thanks :)

Ruan

Ruan, Sounds like you have two good areas to try! With a large coil you are looking for deep objects, so it does not matter if it's farming land or grazing land. However, the smaller surface objects would tend to get plowed under and possibly lost forever. I am VERY interested in your large coil design when you get that going.

One suggestion with your farmer....find out where he may have piled rocks from his field. Go through the pile and look for meteorites.

Let me know how you big coil project goes. I would like to build one.

Jim

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Ruan, Sounds like you have two good areas to try! With a large coil you are looking for deep objects, so it does not matter if it's farming land or grazing land. However, the smaller surface objects would tend to get plowed under and possibly lost forever. I am VERY interested in your large coil design when you get that going.

One suggestion with your farmer....find out where he may have piled rocks from his field. Go through the pile and look for meteorites.

Let me know how you big coil project goes. I would like to build one.

Jim

Hello

i dont yet have the plan for the search coil , still trying to figure out how to make one, but if you have a design or any idea on how to make one ill be VERY interested on how to make it, my other question is i believe a large search coil cannot detect smaller objects only larger and deeper , could there be a way to make a detector with a big search area and sensitivity for smaller meteorites :)

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hello

im new here and i just wanted to know where a good place is to hunt for meteorites , we are gonna move to saskatchewan prairies , its a semi-arid there , and the farmer who we know has lots of farming and grazing land for me to hunt on im planning to build a large search coil that i can pull on a pvc sled.

so i guess my question is is it best to hunt on grazing or farming land , and im not going on any strewn field just going out to look for them and hopefully get lucky :thumbsupanim

and what are the odds that there is meteorites on that field like per sq mile .

im planing to grid it very carefully , and search through the farmers rock piles. thanks :)

Ruan

Ruan M, I suggest that before you spend any time in the field you do some online research. I like to start with the MetBull, the Meteoritical Bulletin, http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meteor/metbull.php, which can be searched by country, province or state, or by name of meteorite. It will give you a list of meteorites found in an area. Like gold, meteorites are best found where they have been found before.

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Hi Ruan,

I am like you in a sense. I did the same thing as you but in Ontario. I tried looking in farms but then when the corn was budding the farmer told me I couldn't look anymore as I would crush the buds. He is right and you have to respect that. And when it was okay to walk over his field I was sinking in mud with my metal detector and the soil is brown :*&$*(: . Here is an article on the probability of finding a meteorite on any square mile, hope this helps, I was researching as usual for meteorite strewn fields here in Canada (http://astronomytips.wordpress.com/tag/types/)

I found a very plausible looking rock weighed 19 kilograms in 2009 in a farmer's rock pile! Sent a sample of it to Professor Alan Hildebrand and unfortunately it was a meteowrong.

Finally I was lucky in finding something not sure if it is a meteorite though on Macdonnell Island here in Ontario in 2009. I tried attaching it for you to see but the limit is 2 MB here and my picture is 5.21 MB. The rock was sitting near the water's edge and it weighed around 1.5 grams. Ever since nothing. But I keep trying and hoping that the estimate "......there is a visible meteorite for every square mile......" is right.

Anyway keep in touch my fellow meteorite hunter from the land of snow and ice! My advice is to do as you are doing devising and being diligent, I am also building a metal detector. Bye for now.

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Hello, guys!

Here, in Ottawa (Ontario) volume of building industry increased dramatically last years. Many many acres of farming lands were converted into residential areas. As result, a giant top soil heaps raised near each construction yard. For now I noticed, that they begun to sift the soil from these heaps and, possibly, sell it as black earth. On place of the heaps I can see relatively small piles of rough soil and rocks.

As result, a rocks from many acres of top soil already were collected, sifted and concentrated in one place. Questions:

- what is probability to find meteorite in one of those pile?

- how many time a chondrite can resist to weather like of Southern Ontario?

Thank you in advance for your answers.

Yuriy

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Hi Guys,

I'm hunting the farm fields here in northern Illinois and Indiana. The giant (PI) detectors are only good for detecting iron or stony iron meteorites that have 50% or more iron content. And they cost about $5000. With 75% of meteorites being ordinary chondrites with about 20% iron, I wouldn't make that kind of investment unless I felt confident that I found a strewnfield that would produce iron or stoney iron meteorites. If you find stony iron or iron meteorites in the farmers rock pile, then it might be a good investment.

The farm fields here are vast, like in Canada so hunting them with a hand held (VLF) detector makes it a real chore. I've had some ideas on how to make it easier. You can swing a detector from the back of a vehicle while someone does the driving at slow speed. You can also drag a magnetic rake that will till some of the soil and collect any magnetic stones.

Cheers,

Jim K

jimski47@aol.com

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I've had some ideas on how to make it easier. You can swing a detector from the back of a vehicle while someone does the driving at slow speed. You can also drag a magnetic rake that will till some of the soil and collect any magnetic stones.

I do believe, you watch the "Meteorite Men" :-)

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  • 2 weeks later...

That is very observant of you Yuriy!

Wow I didn't think of that. I never thought of looking in those heaps. I have looked in farmers' rock piles however. You're like me except you're in Ottawa, I am in Mississauga, ON.

To answer your question first let me tell you I lived in Cornwall for a couple of years. I hunted around Long Sault. I am not sure but I found something that looked like a meteorite in 2009, it was on top of an old asphalt road near the water's edge. You however have the advantage of hunting around Ottawa, I had noticed sandy light colored top soil when I drove around Ottawa. The ground on some farms around Ottawa are composed entirely of sand! Now that would help you a lot, because of the contrast between the dark color of the iron meteorite or stony chondrite and the light colored surrounding sand. I am guessing that a a freshly fallen chondrite would last about 3 to 5 years overground before the iron in it would start disintegrating in Ontario weather. The nickel is oblivious to this process and the olivine and pyroxene present in the chondrules is what would slow this process down.

I would recommend a White's GMT and for you to look in those sandy areas. Please watch out for bobcats though and deer flies, stay beside your car! Lastly please stay in touch as I appreciate the camaraderie of like-minded meteorite hunters and we belong to the same province, wish you were here! We would hunt together! :thumbsupanim

Finally my brother, there is a visible meteorite for every square mile! So the experts tend to agree and say.

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  • 1 month later...

That is very observant of you Yuriy!

Wow I didn't think of that. I never thought of looking in those heaps. I have looked in farmers' rock piles however. You're like me except you're in Ottawa, I am in Mississauga, ON.

To answer your question first let me tell you I lived in Cornwall for a couple of years. I hunted around Long Sault. I am not sure but I found something that looked like a meteorite in 2009, it was on top of an old asphalt road near the water's edge. You however have the advantage of hunting around Ottawa, I had noticed sandy light colored top soil when I drove around Ottawa. The ground on some farms around Ottawa are composed entirely of sand! Now that would help you a lot, because of the contrast between the dark color of the iron meteorite or stony chondrite and the light colored surrounding sand. I am guessing that a a freshly fallen chondrite would last about 3 to 5 years overground before the iron in it would start disintegrating in Ontario weather. The nickel is oblivious to this process and the olivine and pyroxene present in the chondrules is what would slow this process down.

I would recommend a White's GMT and for you to look in those sandy areas. Please watch out for bobcats though and deer flies, stay beside your car! Lastly please stay in touch as I appreciate the camaraderie of like-minded meteorite hunters and we belong to the same province, wish you were here! We would hunt together! :thumbsupanim

Finally my brother, there is a visible meteorite for every square mile! So the experts tend to agree and say.

hi ive been looking in a grazing field for some time haven't found anything yet:( im thinking of buying a PI detector with a 8m perimeter universal coil that i can change into different sizes, for $570 , they probably wont find chondrites right unless they have a fresh fusion crust but will find stony-iron and iron meteorites, there is a place relatively close to us where a single 2.29kg iron meteorite was found .

so there considerably greater chances of finding one there right ?

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Fusion crust has nothing to do with detecting any meteorite...it is the amount of nickel/iron that makes them detectable...and size does matter...of course.

fred

Oh thanks i though the fusion crust has a higher concentration of iron/nickle. thanks so where do you think i should go hunt probably where one was found like the iron one near me it was only 2.29 kilo but there could be more .it was found in the 1940's in a field by a farmer while harvesting . do think thats my best bet or look for a strewn field near me ?

Thanks

Ruan

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You live around Ottawa as I understand. Did you look through the sandy areas of the farms around Ottawa? That is where I am willing to bet you will find meteorites, you will have to choose an undisturbed area and be diligent. I have a strong hunch that the sandy ground areas (yellow sand) will yield chondrites. I have a White's GMT and that is a good detector. PI machines are usually more expensive, but the GMT is good enough to search till a depth of 12 inches below ground. Check in Google the intersection Moodie Drive with Cambrian Road and you will see the extensive sand I am talking about. The sand goes far beyond as well. Now if chondrites have ever fallen on this sand within say the past fifty years they will contrast with the sand and you will see them as dark stones. Try it. Thanks.

hi ive been looking in a grazing field for some time haven't found anything yet:( im thinking of buying a PI detector with a 8m perimeter universal coil that i can change into different sizes, for $570 , they probably wont find chondrites right unless they have a fresh fusion crust but will find stony-iron and iron meteorites, there is a place relatively close to us where a single 2.29kg iron meteorite was found .

so there considerably greater chances of finding one there right ?

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Ruan this is the (meteorite?) that I found, it is the only one that I found so far. Found it on MacDonell Island in Long Sault Parkway.

post-22352-0-01898100-1307476283_thumb.j

post-22352-0-17565100-1307476306_thumb.j

i live in Saskatchewan , there are also some sandy areas around here

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Saskatchewan is even better, semi-arid and sandy, that's the best combination. I'm fairly certain you will find meteorites. Sand drains quickly as well after a rain so it is almost always in a dry state and the meteorites will not weather as quickly if they fall onto sand. Therefore more of them around. You're the man!!!!!!! :thumbsupanim Good luck and happy hunting!

i live in Saskatchewan , there are also some sandy areas around here

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Saskatchewan is even better, semi-arid and sandy, that's the best combination. I'm fairly certain you will find meteorites. Sand drains quickly as well after a rain so it is almost always in a dry state and the meteorites will not weather as quickly if they fall onto sand. Therefore more of them around. You're the man!!!!!!! :thumbsupanim Good luck and happy hunting!

Thanks i also think saskachewan is like the best place in canada for meteorite hunting :)

ill be looking for some sandy areas:)

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Ruan this is the (meteorite?) that I found, it is the only one that I found so far. Found it on MacDonell Island in Long Sault Parkway.

post-22352-0-01898100-1307476283_thumb.j

post-22352-0-17565100-1307476306_thumb.j

How did you determine that is a meteorite?

Jim

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I'm questioning it myself hence the question mark at the end of the word, I haven't been able to obtain the nickel test kit as of yet.

What other tests have you performed?

Magnetic?

Density?

Window?

Streak?

You should NOT need to do a nickle test until all other tests have been performed. If you are in Canada, you can not export the meteorite out of the country without an export permit, but you can possibly find someone up there with an XRF machine that can do a none destructive test on the sample.

Jim

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The one with the dark complexion is wise. The basics are all that a hunter can rely on for identification. Until those basics have been investigated you cannot come to a determination and are not ready to proceed. All minerals are identified by their physical characteristics. A window is the very first thing that should be done with any suspect stone that sticks to a magnet. It is the only way to identify NATIVE IRON FLECKS or CHONDRITES that are present in most meteorites.

A nickel test will be positive on many artifacts and is often misleading if the basics are not done first. I have tested dozens of suspect pieces of rusty scrap metal and often get a good nickel reaction.

Specific gravity, fusion crust, magetism, and the presence of visible metal flakes and/or chondrules are a much better identifying factor than a nickel test. That test is only valid IF ALL OTHER CRITERIA ARE ALSO MET. Identification is a basic analytical process that does not hinge on one specific test.

So do the basic tests for a meteorite before doing anything else. They are easy. Once your rock passes all of these THEN consider a nickel test.

Ther are a dozen neat ways to create a window in a stone to inspect it. All are posted on these forums. A look at the freshly cut interior of that stone will tell a heck of a lot more about it's origin than any other test you can do. And by creating a window you will accomplish a streak test which is also one of the preliminary identifiers.

All of us need to keep reminding ourselves that field identification of meteorites is simple, basic, and requires nothing but following the predetermined steps to identification.

Bob

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