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Rescuers Force to Leave Live Guy In Deep Mineshaft

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Rescuers had to abandon a man at the bottom of a mineshaft despite the fact he

is still living... Here's the story. Unc

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ABANDON HIM WHILE HE'S STILL ALIVE!!!????

I don't like to second guess a rescue that I know nothing about, but as a caver, some choice words come to mind....

I'll keep them to myself until I learn more.

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I read about that. Here's more....

From http://www.tri-cityherald.com/2011/03/05/1395009/man-dies-after-falling-into-nv.html

"The family feels that if Jesus Christ was buried in a tomb, it's good enough for Devin," his grandmother, Lois Westenskow of Layton, Utah, told The Associated Press."

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I see death all the time at work. So it could be argued that I'm desensitized to it to some degree. But i gotta say that were I in charge of a rescue squad, competent at both mountaineering and medicine, I would not allow my men into a situation where their own death is greater than the chances saving the victim. I do like heroics but hate stupidity.. Sorry he fell down a mine and all but..

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Wow- what a story. Someone had to make the gut wrenching decision.

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I see death all the time at work. So it could be argued that I'm desensitized to it to some degree. But i gotta say that were I in charge of a rescue squad, competent at both mountaineering and medicine, I would not allow my men into a situation where their own death is greater than the chances saving the victim. I do like heroics but hate stupidity.. Sorry he fell down a mine and all but..

After falling down a 200' mine shaft how did they know he was still alive? Also how did they determine that a rescue

was to dangerous? A lot of details were left out and no answers....

I'm with you Sport...after spending 20 years as a first responder on a major Fire Dept. there were quite a few

times when I wondered just what the hell made me do what I was doing there....

Bottom line is this guy was screwed big time by grand-ma...if her old azz were down there I bet she would have a

different view of religion!!!!

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After the guy fell 190ft down a shaft, I would have called it a recovery and not even thought about a rescue. Sad, Sad!

That's like fall off a 19 story building. A one way ticket. Dang!

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I look at it like this. If the folks attempting the rescue were not aptly trained or equipped to do that kind of rescue, then call someone in who is. At one point they did get to within 50 feet of him and could assess his condition visually. Maybe what they saw was a person barely holding on to life, who if pulled from the bottom, stood only a minute chance of surviving anyway. Only the person who went down the 50 foot would know that answer. However, when they sent a rescuer down and a large rock fell on the rescuers head and SPLIT HIS HARD HAT.....I think that is a pretty good indication that it was not worth risking the lives of the rescuers.

It is a sad story, however, anyone who frequents the outdoors and explores the way this man did, KNOWS the hazards associated with entering abandoned mines. There comes a time in life when you have to take responsibility for your actions. And this was one of them. Godspeed to Devin.

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As most seasoned miners & prospectors know, you stay away from open shafts, caved in tunnel fronts, etc. Those of use who have worked underground and in mine rescue work, a fall of that distance will pretty much break up your bones. The decision to leave someone is a hard one to make, but you must take into consideration the danger to the rescuers as well as the material thats going to fall down on the person.

Bob

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This whole thing is a tragedy for everyone involved. First the family and friends of the victim. Second, the rescue teams and other first responders and their families and friends. Lastly, the victim himself. Honestly, if the folks who have criticized the decision by the on-scene shot caller have had ANY real-world experience in SAR operations - I would be more than surprised. Unless you were there, with a stake in the game, you have no business second guessing that team leader. - Terry

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......It is sweet to dance to violins,it is delicate and rare..to dance to flutes,to dance to lutes is way beyond compare..but it is not sweet with nimble feet to dance upon the air....lines from the Ballad of Reading Gaol,by Oscar Wilde.May the young explorer rest in peace.

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AMEN Terry! You are right on the money!!

Too many times its full speed ahead and lets take the helo up to rescue a rich Mt climber and damm the concquenses to the crew members and the pilots if they refused a mission, its OK for them to crash on a impossible mission but not OK to say this is foolish, saw it too many times, fortunatly it is becoming less prevalent and people who take risks on MTS and such are now being required to carry rescue insurance in some cases so the taxpayers are not stuck.

I was once the Officer in Charge of a CG Cutter is a popular resort area where the median income was very high, on weekends we would get lots of "out of Gas Calls", dozens in fact! I had read the regulations in the Federal register and found a regulation allowing me to charge $5.00 a gallon for gasoline if I determined it was pure carelessness, didn't matter if the had the money or not, just charged it of a Standard Form 44 to the registered owner of the boat, if they really objected I would tow them to a government dock that was a designated safe harbor and tell them I would be back to tow them to town later along with several others. well it didn't take long before my case load of "Out of Gas" dropped considerably and I could concentrate on real rescues and safety matters. I also went to the local CG Aux and asked them if they wanted to become really active? Sure they said! No OinC before has ever asked for our contribution to real SAR! I set up a training program aboard my 82' patrol boat and when they qualified and wanted to work I put them in the business, they where thrilled,every crew member had an Aux backup! I had access to aircraft and boats and personnel any time I felt the need and all it costs the US goverment was fuel reimbursement the local congressman was also thrilled and the district office was like wise thrilled that he was! But we still charged for gas and some of the CG Aux where also cops of various sorts who just loved aggressive drunks to spout off. I didn't have to do anything and just sat in the pilot house and advised when needed but never put anyone in out of the normal dangers at sea, the aircraft where a different matter they operated under FAA rules and I could ask them too go out but they also knew they could refuse if they felt it was needed. No so the CG Helos, if the district SAR cordinator said they where needed then it was up to their commanding officer to say go or not as he did for the Katrina rescues on his on, sense there where no comms with SAR center.

" You have to go out but you don't have too come back"

Old outdated saying!

I have a nephew (former Marine, what else?) Who is a mine rescue team leader, you do not want to hear his stories!!!

Max

This whole thing is a tragedy for everyone involved. First the family and friends of the victim. Second, the rescue teams and other first responders and their families and friends. Lastly, the victim himself. Honestly, if the folks who have criticized the decision by the on-scene shot caller have had ANY real-world experience in SAR operations - I would be more than surprised. Unless you were there, with a stake in the game, you have no business second guessing that team leader. - Terry

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Hello All, As a retired Law Enforcment Officer and former Sheriff I have been involved in numerious search/rescue and recovery mission, mostly lost hikers or hunters and Mountian Climbers. Most are reported at night. I will get the logistic started and get a Command Post set up but I would never send my people out on a search or Mt. rescue in the dark...People with broken legs ect. will be of no help...The safety of your people is first priority-Always............Its hard for the family of the person that is missing to understand. Also The chances of completing you mission is so much greater when you can see more than what a headlamp puts out....Ya Know this is why most of these places are being closed, sad to say people ignoring signs in a lot of these cases....Idaho Al

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Rescuers had to abandon a man at the bottom of a mineshaft despite the fact he

is still living... Here's the story. Unc

Here is a link regarding old mine shafts and rescues. Apparently rescuers will rescue dogs as well as people and other critters. There are two pages to this article, one giving instances and conditions of the rescued.

http://www.conservation.ca.gov/omr/abandoned_mine_lands/Documents/AMLUFactSheet3_Jan2010.pdf

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When I was about 14 yrs old my sister and I were exploring a mine shaft above our house. The mine only went back about 100 ft but not too far in there was a shaft sunk down only about 10-12 ft. on one side. When I shined my light down it I saw eyeballs. We made haste out of there. Once outside we stopped to consider what it might be and eventually got up the nerve to go back in and see. It tuned out to be a dog, a Malamute, that had fallen down the shaft. He wasn't much more than skin and bones. We hiked the half mile or so back to the house and got a ladder, bucket and rope, food and water and went back up. I lowered the food and water down to it and let it eat and drink a bit before we lowered the ladder into the shaft and hauled him out. He lived with us for awhile but was always spooked by thunder and lightning. He eventually ran off one day during a storm. Who knows, maybe he wound up back in the mine.

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When I was about 14 yrs old my sister and I were exploring a mine shaft above our house. The mine only went back about 100 ft but not too far in there was a shaft sunk down only about 10-12 ft. on one side. When I shined my light down it I saw eyeballs. We made haste out of there. Once outside we stopped to consider what it might be and eventually got up the nerve to go back in and see. It tuned out to be a dog, a Malamute, that had fallen down the shaft. He wasn't much more than skin and bones. We hiked the half mile or so back to the house and got a ladder, bucket and rope, food and water and went back up. I lowered the food and water down to it and let it eat and drink a bit before we lowered the ladder into the shaft and hauled him out. He lived with us for awhile but was always spooked by thunder and lightning. He eventually ran off one day during a storm. Who knows, maybe he wound up back in the mine.

Neat story and lucky dog....

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