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Doug f

Agate

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I was detecting in north Nevada last summer and found a pretty rock, was told by a person at Rye Patch, who digs crystals, that it was Agate. It is red, white and tanish.

Does agates have much value. This rock weighs 11 pounds.

Thanks ahead of time,

Doug

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I was detecting in north Nevada last summer and found a pretty rock, was told by a person at Rye Patch, who digs crystals, that it was Agate. It is red, white and tanish.

Does agates have much value. This rock weighs 11 pounds.

Thanks ahead of time,

Doug

give us some photo's.... I'm sure some rock shops sell them...

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Well you can consider your self honored to meet "Peg Leg John" ! How many crystals did you buy?

If John said it was agate it probably is and he knows where it came from. Good pictures will help Id it.

Some agate sells for 100's of dollars a LB and some is worthless even some jasper sells for many $ a square inch.

When you see John again ask him how his Toyota got stuck in camp while he was in town at Walmart!

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Well you can consider your self honored to meet "Peg Leg John" ! How many crystals did you buy?

If John said it was agate it probably is and he knows where it came from. Good pictures will help Id it.

Some agate sells for 100's of dollars a LB and some is worthless even some jasper sells for many $ a square inch.

When you see John again ask him how his Toyota got stuck in camp while he was in town at Walmart!

I will most definately tell John he was caught. Must have taken his international, probably doesn't like his dollar truck that much or maybe low on gas.

John always comes by to say hi and sell things. I showed him my latest find, a 4x1 cristyl, he said it was jem quality. I have no way of knowing if it is in fact. John did try to keep his cool when I showed him the rock however.

re the rock, will try to get a couple of good shots and post. Thanks for the help.

Doug

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give us some photo's.... I'm sure some rock shops sell them...

Here are some photos of rock.

post-24008-0-49329100-1298939199_thumb.j

post-24008-0-08911600-1298939233_thumb.j

post-24008-0-72744100-1298939257_thumb.j

post-24008-0-20609800-1298939281_thumb.j

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I can't ID it from the pictures, it looks sort of like Opal, take it to a rock shop or a geology school or some one who can eyeball it .

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I can't ID it from the pictures, it looks sort of like Opal, take it to a rock shop or a geology school or some one who can eyeball it .

I agree that is does look like common opal. Common opal is opal without fire. If it is not crazed then it would have some value but setting a value on an unknown source is not easy. Good material can bring a few $ per pound. Some common opal can cost hundreds of $ per pound. Those types are from known locations that the material is desirable mainly due to rarity and aesthetic value.

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AH Casey, if it had fire like your cabs he would not have a door to beat down would he?

Max

I agree that is does look like common opal. Common opal is opal without fire. If it is not crazed then it would have some value but setting a value on an unknown source is not easy. Good material can bring a few $ per pound. Some common opal can cost hundreds of $ per pound. Those types are from known locations that the material is desirable mainly due to rarity and aesthetic value.

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Hey Max - That would be true if it was good stuff but unfortunately very little good fire opal comes out of Nevada. It tends to craze when you remove it from water so for jewelry it is not something I want to mess with. A friend of mine cut a bunch of cabs from Nevada opal and within 6 months all but one had crazed. I have seen some very good fire opal from Spencer, Idaho but have yet to cut any. If I am going to pay a lot for opal I prefer to buy the Australian and African stuff since it is proven to be stable material.

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Hey Max - That would be true if it was good stuff but unfortunately very little good fire opal comes out of Nevada. It tends to craze when you remove it from water so for jewelry it is not something I want to mess with. A friend of mine cut a bunch of cabs from Nevada opal and within 6 months all but one had crazed. I have seen some very good fire opal from Spencer, Idaho but have yet to cut any. If I am going to pay a lot for opal I prefer to buy the Australian and African stuff since it is proven to be stable material.

This rock was setting on top of the ground not in water. Do they craze only after being cut? As you can tell I'm ignorant when it comes to rocks.

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It could already be crazed or it can happen after it is cut. Some opals will adsorb some of the water used during the cutting process then when it dries it will craze. Even a rock lying on the ground in the desert has more water available to it then once it is in our air-conditioned houses. From what little I know common opal has less water within it then precious opal and therefore is less susceptible to crazing.

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I am prone to crazing when I absorb alcohol :shrug:

I have found a whole bunch of common opal and I am not sure what you mean by "crazing"? What is the scoop?

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Crazed is basically cracked. I don’t know why but if you talk to an opal freak they get butt hurt if you don’t use the term “crazed” instead of cracked.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/craze

Understood. It is really easy to fracture mining it. We use bore holes, lime, and wood dowels to gently break the volcanic rock it is found in. I have always heard it was really tough to polish and cut without cracking. Or crazing.

Thanks for the input. You learn something new every day. I always thought I was crazed, but now I know I am just cracked.

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Here are some photos of rock.

I went to a shop today to get the rock checked out. The fellow told me it was Opalized Agate, this is a little different take. As far as value goes, he said that he couldn't put a value on it or consider buying until he cut it. He did say that it was a "beautiful rock" and his saw couldn't cut the rock because of the size. He added that he was buying a bigger saw because of the demand and would call me when he got it.

Who knows, it may fall apart when getting cut.

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I went to a shop today to get the rock checked out. The fellow told me it was Opalized Agate, this is a little different take. As far as value goes, he said that he couldn't put a value on it or consider buying until he cut it. He did say that it was a "beautiful rock" and his saw couldn't cut the rock because of the size. He added that he was buying a bigger saw because of the demand and would call me when he got it.

Who knows, it may fall apart when getting cut.

It is a neat color. And it looks like a nice thick vein. I think common opal is one of the most beautiful minerals. When it is not looking like bird poop it shows some really nice colors.

Some of the opal that I have found was "backed" with a cinnamon colored layer that had a beautiful patina right against the host rock (andesite). It was cut so that you looked through a translucent magenta tinted opal "lens" onto the thin layer of material that showed "play". The pattern was similar to tigereye or siderite but a little different color. It had to be cut and fashioned just right to reveal its true beauty. I thought it was spectacular but it wasnt worth much. And it was extremely difficult to get rocks out of the formation without shattering it into little purple shards.

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I went to a shop today to get the rock checked out. The fellow told me it was Opalized Agate, this is a little different take. As far as value goes, he said that he couldn't put a value on it or consider buying until he cut it. He did say that it was a "beautiful rock" and his saw couldn't cut the rock because of the size. He added that he was buying a bigger saw because of the demand and would call me when he got it.

Who knows, it may fall apart when getting cut.

Unlike the opal found at Virgin Valley, the opalized agate you have is probably very stable and I doubt very much it will fall apart when cut since its already been exposed to the elements.

Steve

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Hey Max - That would be true if it was good stuff but unfortunately very little good fire opal comes out of Nevada. It tends to craze when you remove it from water so for jewelry it is not something I want to mess with. A friend of mine cut a bunch of cabs from Nevada opal and within 6 months all but one had crazed. I have seen some very good fire opal from Spencer, Idaho but have yet to cut any. If I am going to pay a lot for opal I prefer to buy the Australian and African stuff since it is proven to be stable material.

My guess is over 90% of the opal from Virgin Valley is prone to crazing whereas the opposite is true for Australian opal where only about 5% or is prone to crazing. Someone told me that it's closer to 50% for Australian opal but I don't believe that one bit. I am hoping Johnno can chime in on this topic.

I will say precious opal from Virgin Valley can rival any opal found elsewhere in the world. The University of Nevada and private individuals have spent a lot time and money on trying to find a way to stabilize it much like most turquoise is stabilized with epoxies,etc - but to no avail. Think of the market that would result if they could stabilize Virgin Valley opal for jewelry purposes. As it is- most of it is stored and displayed in glass jars filled with water, glycerin,etc.

Steve

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I was detecting in north Nevada last summer and found a pretty rock, was told by a person at Rye Patch, who digs crystals, that it was Agate. It is red, white and tanish.

Does agates have much value. This rock weighs 11 pounds.

Thanks ahead of time,

Doug

I want to thank everyone who commented on this post, keeping the ball rolling and encouraging further inspection of the rock. It will most likely be 2-3 months before I have it slabbed and will post the results at that time.

Again thanks, Doug

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Me too.....

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G'Day Everyone

I just saw this, sorry for the slow response. Trying to catch up this weekend. It was a wonderful day in Southern California.

I have to agree with Steve (Goldfinger) in regards to Australian opal. The opal we have is relatively stable. As for the pictures being posted, I really can't say. I'm not familiar with common opal throughout the world, mainly Australia and I find this unusual and very interesting.

I'll hold back my conclusions on it until further posts. I don't want to look like a bigger idiot than I already am.

Cheers

Johnno

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