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Feldspar?


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Hello all. First post here at Nugget Shooter. Always enjoyed scouting out and finding rocks of all sorts yet my knowledge lacks...a lot haha. So Im a ceramist and after reading an inspirational essay Ive decided to try and utilize my local environment to; A: save money (in a sense) B: Be more green AND C: take pride in knowing I did the work. Im a big DIY person. So I am located in the NE Georgia area, Hartwell to be exact. I know that GA is a huge Kaolin industry. My hopes to find some Kaolin deposits are high so who knows. I came across a ton of this lovely white rock which I had hopes was kaolinite but after many mix and match pictures Im not sure where to lean. I know that feldspars (which are great for glaze bases) are incredibly abundant. I thought this rock looked like white feldspar. It is relatively strong but can be broken by hand. It forms square like blocks that are easy to snap apart and there is usually a yellow gold color in between these pieces. Some points the rock is extremely white and other parts it tends to be translucent. Help on this would be fantastic. Im having trouble with certain indexes because very few focus on these seemingly unimportant rocks.

I ball milled some of it down into some fine powder added some water and through it in the kiln on some clay to see what would happen come 2200 degrees.

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Really hard to tell feldspar apart from some other minerals,even if you have it in your hand. Did a locality search on mindat to see what was in that area. Just because it's not listed doesn't mean it's not there. On the other hand, it could be something else. Good luck.

http://www.mindat.org/lsearch.php?from=nsearch&loc=hartwell

Steve

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never heard of mindat.org. I guess that will come useful in the near future. Well it didnt melt at all or even glass over after the kiln run. In some sense it should of if it were a feldspar but who knows. I was digging around by Lake Hartwell (which isnt a natural lake) so who knows what I picked up being that they dug a lot in certain areas so there is just a mess of granite, quartz, mica, and my mystery white rock. Thank you though for the input it is very much appreciated.

ahha and yes jason now that I look at it it does tend to resemble a nice cheese :yuk-yuk:

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hello all. First post here at Nugget Shooter. Always enjoyed scouting out and finding rocks of all sorts yet my knowledge lacks...a lot haha. So Im a ceramist and after reading an inspirational essay Ive decided to try and utilize my local environment to; A: save money (in a sense) B: Be more green AND C: take pride in knowing I did the work. Im a big DIY person. So I am located in the NE Georgia area, Hartwell to be exact. I know that GA is a huge Kaolin industry. My hopes to find some Kaolin deposits are high so who knows. I came across a ton of this lovely white rock which I had hopes was kaolinite but after many mix and match pictures Im not sure where to lean. I know that feldspars (which are great for glaze bases) are incredibly abundant. I thought this rock looked like white feldspar. It is relatively strong but can be broken by hand. It forms square like blocks that are easy to snap apart and there is usually a yellow gold color in between these pieces. Some points the rock is extremely white and other parts it tends to be translucent. Help on this would be fantastic. Im having trouble with certain indexes because very few focus on these seemingly unimportant rocks.

I ball milled some of it down into some fine powder added some water and through it in the kiln on some clay to see what would happen come 2200 degrees.

dsc07094r.jpg

dsc07093c.jpg

Hi

Just read your post I'm also a potter in ca when not out prospecting. Also just started looking around at my local environment as well. Cool picture There is a good book I recently purchased called Glazes from Natural sources by Brian Sutherland very good info on this type of subject another good book i use the most is by michael cardew called pioneer pottery

also very good section on geology for potters.

Phillip

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