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Buckshot

Quartz Veins

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I've located a couple of quartz veins on my farm, are there any possibilty of finding anything other that gold, such as gemstones if I pursue these veins. At first glance veins are a few inches wide and contain mostly quartz & feldspar ? Figured some of you would know without me doing a lot of research. Should I uncover more of the veins ? Oh yes the farm is in Western North Carolina in the South Mountain Gold Belt.

Thanks,

Buckshot

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I've located a couple of quartz veins on my farm, are there any possibilty of finding anything other that gold, such as gemstones if I pursue these veins. At first glance veins are a few inches wide and contain mostly quartz & feldspar ? Figured some of you would know without me doing a lot of research. Should I uncover more of the veins ? Oh yes the farm is in Western North Carolina in the South Mountain Gold Belt.

Thanks,

Buckshot

Are you finding any gemstones in your creek if you have one? Whatever veins you find have been eroding for eons and anything of value would have traveled into a creek,etc. Sample the creeks. If there's nothing , chances are there's nothing in the veins. You could do some deep sampling near the veins but I doubt if you'll find anything either.

Steve

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Steve: In creek I've found rubies, garnets, sapphires, epidote, small (I mean you need a microscope) to see all the colorful gemstones in the concentrates etc. different shades of red and green and orange and have also found gold.

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How does the quartz vein look, it is pitted, are there areas for gold to maybe settle? Is there any iron staining, is it just pure white with no other mineralization? I think your odds go up if it is just not a quite quartz vein or "bull" quartz. Are these small semi-decomposed veins or rather large? What is the width? Any quartz crystals associated with it?

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How does the quartz vein look, it is pitted, are there areas for gold to maybe settle? Is there any iron staining, is it just pure white with no other mineralization? I think your odds go up if it is just not a quite quartz vein or "bull" quartz. Are these small semi-decomposed veins or rather large? What is the width? Any quartz crystals associated with it?

Big Rex: The vein is in red clay, it is in the headwall of what appears to possibly have been hydraulicked in the past. Don't know if I mentioned it before but they gold mined here in the 1800's and early 1900's, weather was nice here today and I went down and spent 2-3 hours uncovering maybe 15-20 ft and running parallel to the vein on each side but not the entire vein is yellow material, could be mica, I panned a couple of pans and maybe had a couple of specks of gold, nothing more. there is also black mineralization and some of the wall I uncovered almost looks pink with some white and black in various places. The quartz is mostly off white with possibly some smokey but not really clear except for a few small crystals. There was also some darker brown quartz rocks, I brought some home to clean up some more & look at. The part of the vein I've uncovered is like 3" to 6" in width at the most. It runs just almost parallel with the setting sun just to the right of it towards the north side and the dip, I believe that's what you call it is probably 45 to 60 degrees. I won't be able to uncover much more with pick & shovel as it will be getting deep.

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Steve: In my earlier reply I said the gemstones were small, microscopic, I meant only the orange, green, yellow etc. On another post on here regarding rubies or corundum I got a couple pictures of some of the corundum.

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post-23981-0-75822400-1296444279_thumb.jpost-23981-0-78290500-1296444425_thumb.jpost-23981-0-57512400-1296444537_thumb.jpost-23981-0-09315600-1296444637_thumb.j

The first two pictures are materials from the quartz vein and the last two pictures are of the vein itself, sorry they are not clearer.

Buckshot

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Is this a Quartz vein or Pegmatite vein? Pegmatites are much better known for gems being associated with them than Quartz which hosts our gold and other metals.

Quartz can be found in a variety of colors, violet (amethyst), golden yellow (citrine), pink or peachish (rose quartz), brown (smoky quartz), green (prasiolite) and colorless (rock crystal). Quartz is sometimes found with inclusions of other minerals such as rutile (sagenite, or rutilated quartz) or tourmaline (tourmalinated quartz), making them look quite remarkable. Chalcedony, a micro-crystalline member of the quartz family consists of a number of stones, namely agate, dendritic agate, fire agate, bloodstone (heliotrope), plasma, chrysoprase, prase, fossilized wood, jasper, carnelian, moss agate, onyx, sardonyx, and sard....

The following will help some in the Pegmatite dept...

Whats a pegmatite? (By glowingrocks)

This is a question I am often asked while talking about mineral collecting.What is a pegmatite?

My simple answer is a light colored rock formation which consist of large crystals of feldspar,quartz and mica.But that is a simple explanation of a common pegmatite and pegmatites can be far from common in many cases.So even in a common pegmatite there is feldspar,quartz and mica,still simple until you understand the feldspar may be microcline,albite,orthoclase or any of the other feldspar minerals.the quartz may be rose,smokey,milky or clear.The mica may be muscovite,biotite or lepidlite to name a few from that group.So you could have nice crystals of microcline or colorful gem amazonite from the feldspar group.Clear text book crystals of quartz or gem rose quartz from that group.And the mica could be pink lepidolite or green muscovite to name a few minerals from the micas.even in a common pegmatite there can be minerals,crystals and gemstones to collect.

A more detailed explanation of a pegmatite is this.A pegmatite is of the igneous rock group.It consist of feldspar,quartz and mica and the crystals are large in size.Still a somewhat simple explanation of what can be very complex.Some pegmatites have high concentrations of trace minerals and they can have gems and rare minerals in quantity in them.Lithium,beryllium,cesium,tantalum,boron and uranium as well as other trace elements can be found in quantity in some pegmatites.Rare minerals and gems like beryl,spodumene,tantalite,uraninite are found in some pegmatites.Gems like aquamarine,topaz,garnets,kunzite are the result of high concentrations of trace elements.

Note:The largest crystals of many minerals have been found in pegmatites.

Pegmatites have long been mined for the minerals found in them.Here in the northeast the history of mining pegmatites goes back to early 1800's with muscovite mica being the mineral of interest.Muscovite was used as a glass substitute in woodstove and many people still recall isinglass mine or Isinglass Mountain.Today there are several gem mining operations in Maine and New England.Gem aquamarine and gem tourmaline being the main mineral of interest.Worldwide pegmatites are mined for gems of all kinds.emerald,topaz,tourmaline,ruby and sapphire ect...There are important minerals mined for lithium, tin, tungsten and the rare earth metals.

So pegmatites are a great place to go mining for minerals,crystals and gemstones.I have many crystals,gems and rare minerals in my personal collection which i found in pegmatites.They are an important part of our modern world.This is as simple as I can put it to you.Alas pegmatites are beyond what is simple and are beyond my simple explanation.

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Is this a Quartz vein or Pegmatite vein? Pegmatites are much better known for gems being associated with them than Quartz which hosts our gold and other metals.

Quartz can be found in a variety of colors, violet (amethyst), golden yellow (citrine), pink or peachish (rose quartz), brown (smoky quartz), green (prasiolite) and colorless (rock crystal). Quartz is sometimes found with inclusions of other minerals such as rutile (sagenite, or rutilated quartz) or tourmaline (tourmalinated quartz), making them look quite remarkable. Chalcedony, a micro-crystalline member of the quartz family consists of a number of stones, namely agate, dendritic agate, fire agate, bloodstone (heliotrope), plasma, chrysoprase, prase, fossilized wood, jasper, carnelian, moss agate, onyx, sardonyx, and sard....

The following will help some in the Pegmatite dept...

I was not aware of pegmatite veins as such had heard of pegmatite pockets, I just assumed it was a quartz vein however there is some of the materials you mentioned in the pegmatite veins. Have not saw any large crystals as yet. There was one rock in the picture which you couldn't probably make out that had long sort of crystals which I thought was quartz they are right neat looking, sort of clear to a yellow tint to them.

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Can a pegmatite vein be in red clay of does it have to be in a host rock, been reading some on it and am not sure ?

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Can a pegmatite vein be in red clay of does it have to be in a host rock, been reading some on it and am not sure ?

Pegmatite is essentially restricted to Barrovian Facies Sequence metamorphic rocks of at least middle greenschist facies, and often also intimately associated with granites intruding into such terranes.

Worldwide, notable pegmatite occurrences are within the major cratons, and within greenschist-facies metamorphic belts. However, pegmatite localities are only well recorded when economic mineralization is found.

Within the metamorphic belts, pegmatite tends to concentrate around granitic bodies within zones of low mean strain and within zones of extension, for example within the strain shadow of a large rigid granite body. Similarly, pegmatite is often found within the contact zone of granite, transitional with some greisens, as a late-stage magmatic-hydrothermal effect of syn-metamorphic granitic magmatism. Some skarns associated with granites also tend to host pegmatites.

Aplite dykes and porphyry dykes may exploit pegmatite within wall rocks to intrusions and vice versa, creating a confused sequence of felsic intrusive apophyses within the aureole of some granites.

You will find more info here... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pegmatite

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Quartz is pretty common material, I think much more so in the Appalachians than out west. Out west it seems like quartz on average is more likely to harbor gold. Pretty much I guess you would have to just sample to see if it is gold bearing. Out west a quartz vein can be literally surrounded by non-igneous rock that it has intruded up into, but back east it seems more common for a quartz vein to be found in place within a large batholith or surrounded by igneous rock that has been uncovered by erosion over time. So, it wasn't the sole outlet from far below the earth's surface for the gold, rather, if there is gold, it might be interspersed and be of low concentration throughout the surrounding rock (if there is any to begin with). That's my take on it, others with more knowledge might be able to more fully explain or point out errors in my reasoning.

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Pegmatite is essentially restricted to Barrovian Facies Sequence metamorphic rocks of at least middle greenschist facies, and often also intimately associated with granites intruding into such terranes.

Worldwide, notable pegmatite occurrences are within the major cratons, and within greenschist-facies metamorphic belts. However, pegmatite localities are only well recorded when economic mineralization is found.

Within the metamorphic belts, pegmatite tends to concentrate around granitic bodies within zones of low mean strain and within zones of extension, for example within the strain shadow of a large rigid granite body. Similarly, pegmatite is often found within the contact zone of granite, transitional with some greisens, as a late-stage magmatic-hydrothermal effect of syn-metamorphic granitic magmatism. Some skarns associated with granites also tend to host pegmatites.

Aplite dykes and porphyry dykes may exploit pegmatite within wall rocks to intrusions and vice versa, creating a confused sequence of felsic intrusive apophyses within the aureole of some granites.

You will find more info here... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pegmatite

Bill --- Thanks for the link. Living in Missouri, I never did come across any pegmatites in the field. I did see quite a bit when I was in the Rich Hill area, mainly in Weaver creek in the form of water worn boulders. Thought about trying to track the source but it must have come from a real long ways upstream- if you could even find the source of it.. Some really large beryl crystals were supposed to have been found someplace in the Weaver Mountains and I just wonder if those pegmatites were the source of them. Also saw quite a bit in the Bradshaw Mountains.

Steve

Steve

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Bill, Big Rex & All: Thanks for the help, web sites, thoughts from each. I'm still not really sure if it's a quartz or pegmatite vein. Its has some similar rocks and material that are mentioned in the pegmatite veins from looking at the pictures on some of the websites. Will keep an open mind and try to uncover more of it when the weather improves and see what we have.

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Bill --- Thanks for the link. Living in Missouri, I never did come across any pegmatites in the field. I did see quite a bit when I was in the Rich Hill area, mainly in Weaver creek in the form of water worn boulders. Thought about trying to track the source but it must have come from a real long ways upstream- if you could even find the source of it.. Some really large beryl crystals were supposed to have been found someplace in the Weaver Mountains and I just wonder if those pegmatites were the source of them. Also saw quite a bit in the Bradshaw Mountains.

Steve

Steve

Hi Steve there are indeed some very long Pegmatite dikes on Weaver Mountain and that is where the Epidote sample I showed a while back came from.... You can see them running along the face of the mountain.

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Bill, Big Rex & All: Thanks for the help, web sites, thoughts from each. I'm still not really sure if it's a quartz or pegmatite vein. Its has some similar rocks and material that are mentioned in the pegmatite veins from looking at the pictures on some of the websites. Will keep an open mind and try to uncover more of it when the weather improves and see what we have.

Here are some papers discussing Pegmatite in Western North Carolina...

http://www.jgeosci.org/content/jgeosci.062_2010_1_swanson.pdf

It also appears you do have a gem to look for...

Hiddenite: North Carolina's Unique Gem

http://www.emporia.edu/earthsci/amber/go340/students/martin/

Age and Distribution of Pegmatites...

http://www.minsocam.org/ammin/AM20/AM20_81.pdf

Also there could be yet undiscovered gem occurrences as well.... Appears there are many possibilities in your area, Hiddenite is found in an area of Alexander County called the Hiddenite District. This ten square kilometer district is not only the discovery site of the gem hiddenite, but also the location of North America's largest and finest emerald deposits.

Good Hunting...

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