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Fsbirdhouse

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What is the very largest boulder that anyone here has ever personally seen move, or be moved significantly during a large storm?

I hear stories of house sized boulders being moved in some of the mega storms that have hit California in years past, but then you're talking about boulders in the 100 ton- 200 ton weight.

Have river drainage's in modern times really carried enough volume of water to move that size boulders?

Anybody seen it?

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When the river is raging and moving gigantic boulders the water is very dirty. You can not see what is happening in the channel, but you can feel the earth vibrate and you can listen to the constant rumbling of rocks bouncing over bedrock. Later, when the water subsides, is when you get to "see" what has been moved. Some of these that I have seen are larger than a vehicle. I've never seen house sized boulders that have been moved by water alone, but I am confident it has happened many, many times.

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:arrowheadsmiley: Ray Elam and the boys made history when they worked the Drivers Flat Campgrounds where 49 used to cross back in the early 90's. The boulder was EASILY bigger than a greyhound bus in 30+' a water and thats how it was moved. 3 massive boat recovery bags,2 rhino winches,3 hand crankers,3 floating platforms(3/5/7/ barrell with 5-6-12 hp engines) with DAM Industry winches and that lifted it a couple a inches and moved about 12 feet and POUNDS AND POUNDS AND POUNDS AND POUNDS with a 3 1/2+ pounder as the bign' of the bunch. BUT nuttn' but bad luck came from over a $million$$ easily at depressed prices was recovered in less than 15 months :WOW: John
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Hoser John,

Are you saying the boulder as big as a greyhound bus was 'recently' moved by water, and then moved again by all of that equipment?

Or, did you mean that a boulder that had sat in place forever collecting gold beneath it had finally been moved to produce the million?

This latter scenario I would expect to be the case, and is the point of this thread.

I believe that the very largest megalithic boulders have not seen the volume of water required to move them in historical times in most river drainage's. Pick-up size boulders yes, but unless you have the volume of water from a dam collapse, or iceberg size chunks of ice involved (as was the case recently in Iceland)I really wonder if modern floods can move a 100 ton-200 ton boulder at all.

Apparently the boulder you mentioned must have been in-place for millennia to have collected all that gold beneath it. This is what you meant.

I wouldn't be surprised if most states will not allow such huge boulders to be moved in constant watercourses, but in areas of seasonal water, or dry placer areas, I doubt there would be much opposition.

Such stones are apparent wherever they exist, and are excellent gold traps, especially if found in boulder packs.

Again, when such boulders are located, it should be presumed they were transported to their present location by a force that would have put all other materials around them in suspension, thus depositing them against the bedrock where the voids between the bedrock and boulder should later be filled with the heavier sands and gold, the lighter materials being replaced over time by the heavier.

Now it remains for us to collect this gold by moving the boulder. It can be done by a single man, tho having a partner would be better for any number of reasons. It can be done by the use of hand tools a single person can carry.

I say this in light of having moved objects of many tens of tons myself over a career spanning 37 years. I am talking about the use of hydraulic jacks, both bottle jacks, and hydraulic 'rams' such as the Porta-Power.

I am not talking about lifting these stones, or rolling them, or any activity that would ever become unstable! I am talking about pivoting or sliding these stones off their present 'footprint'. Preferably in shallow water or a dry location.

Bottle jacks of twenty ton capacity are available at Harbor freight, cost only about $40, and weigh from 21-25 pounds.

http://www.harborfreight.com/20-ton-hydraulic-bottle-jack-66482.html

At that price and weight, any number required can be brought to bear to move......anything!

Enerpac rams are much more expensive, but even a 50 ton low profile ram can be carried by a single person.

Extensions for any of these jacks would be needed, anything from railroad ties to be cut on location (To start cheaply), to box-iron extensions drilled to be advanced.

Each stone to be moved would have any number of variables to consider in planning, but I'd shoot for low-profile, large stones with as big a surface area to clean once moved.

Now I can't put my arms around a freezer and lift it, but my wife can put her back against the wall, and walk one all over. Same principle!

Brace off a larger stone, or bedrock (even if you have to dig to get to it), and 5 twenty ton jacks should move a 100+ ton boulder.

Something to consider!

Oh yeah, one more thing. Pick your boulders right, you'll have no more hit and miss prospecting!

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The dang dam broke and sent a 200+' wall a water down the Ruck a Chucky rapids and threw EVERYTHING all over no matter how big. Their was road construction going on and never found d-9,graders and dumptrucks righteously disappeared in the quagmire. Ray and boyz were taken there and I showed them where we left off and he became campground host --BUT--cautionary tale-Wife left and ripped off $100,000+++++ in gold and divorced--son drunk at Docs in foresthill and murdered for his bigmouth and poke, booze ate the rest up and the IRS drilled the SDbox at Washington Mutual and carted off pounds/pounds/pounds and things haven't changed since the 1800's as my dredge crew would get paid and disappear over the hill in Reno for days and come home broke,hung over and scratching their privates--no changes--John :yuk-yuk: :pukes:

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Hoser John,

Great story.

I have heard other versions about Rucky-Chucky (different spellings too),

but they all pretty much mirror what you said. That must have been some flood.

I had two friends who dredged there in the 70's and they found a lot of gold.

A lot.

All the best,

Flak

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A comparable event occurred on the Salmon River around 1976 or so about halfway between Forks Of Salmon and the Klamath River. In that event a huge section of mountain gave way and slid into the river channel creating a natural dam. The water continued building up behind it and things were getting scary. So the Corps of Engineers decided to blow it up before the pent up water volume [read: pressure] got any higher. The resulting flood took out almost every bridge on its way to the Pacific Ocean. This is so because in a fixed channel pressure determines velocity. In this case the velocity of the flow was awesome and really threw things around. As a result a person today can metal detect nuggets that were thrown high up the bank walls. VW sized rocks were moved and probably larger.

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Dredged the Klamath back in '85, bought into the mini-rush Dave McCraken started when he claimed up most of the northern part of the Klamath, and then advertised in the California mining journal.

Unfortunately, the claims we bought turned out to be in gravels too deep for even the 8" dredge we had. We later moved our dredge up to the Salmon, reduced the intake to 6" and began working there, finding a few smallish pickers and some fines.

My trade then took me to E Idaho where I now live, and haven't done any dredging since.

Now I'm retired, and if health allows, I may do some small scale prospecting in the near future. Going to check out a few places on the west slope of the Sierras in a couple of months.

When I go back, I'll be looking for seasonal streams, and I'll be taking Jacks.

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Dredged the Klamath back in '85, bought into the mini-rush Dave McCraken started when he claimed up most of the northern part of the Klamath, and then advertised in the California mining journal.

Unfortunately, the claims we bought turned out to be in gravels too deep for even the 8" dredge we had. We later moved our dredge up to the Salmon, reduced the intake to 6" and began working there, finding a few smallish pickers and some fines.

My trade then took me to E Idaho where I now live, and haven't done any dredging since.

Now I'm retired, and if health allows, I may do some small scale prospecting in the near future. Going to check out a few places on the west slope of the Sierras in a couple of months.

When I go back, I'll be looking for seasonal streams, and I'll be taking Jacks.

I my self cannot say i've seen large boulders. But I did see in either the 80's or 90's when a storm in southern Ca. when and took out a mobile home park along the river that goes from Santer clarita to the ocean towards valencia.

Cannot remember the name and I'm too lazy to look on a map. BUt it really cleared out the homes and cars.

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