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Dragging Coil Behind ATV


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Here is a pix of my friend Stanley on my ATV. Note coil behind ATV and PI detector hanging on Stanley's neck.

Our system works like this... I walk along and Stanley keeps circling me. When Stanley hears a bleep we check it out.

Given the coil is 40 inches wide and the ATV moves at 5-10 mph we can cover a lot of ground in a few hours.

The sensitivity is no better or no worse than a standard metal detector.

This system works great on smooth surfaces (dry lake beds)... rough surfaces are a different story.

Note I can also control this ATV remotely or using GPS tracking.

sundownr

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I just can't see that working on dry lake bed chondrites. Most of the chondrites I've found on dry lake beds are so heavily weathered they will barely set off a VLF metal detector. Not to mention the salt will wreak havoc with any detector. Your best bet on dry lake beds is to ride a quad or walk with a magnet and spot them. Sheez I'm willing to bet that wouldn't even work out at Franconia or Gold Basin where there's oodles of good size chondrites waiting to be found.

That technique may work on strewnfields that have large iron or stony irons (both are pretty rare meteorites) but it's probably a waste of time on dry lake beds or chondritic strewnfields.

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Paseclipse

You are propbably right. I haven't used this coil enough to evaluate its use under different conditions.

My real point was how to cover more ground in less time. Also note my primary targets are very large iron/nickle meteorites.

If I can find just 1 in my lifetime I will be happy as my dog when she eats pizza or ice cream.

sundownr

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Use a quad and learn how to recognize chondrites. With spotting you will cover more ground in a day than you would using a metal detector even if it has a huge coil.

Iron meteorites are extremely rare and make up less than 5% of the meteorite finds, the vast majority are chondrites. Why spend a lifetime passing up chondrites looking for that one extremely rare iron meteorite?

Yeah that technique might work great out at Brenham or maybe even Glorietta (if the terrain wasn't so steep) but realistically it's probably a waste of time on any dry lake bed.

Martin, BLM would be on you like flies on s$%t if you tried dragging that thing on a dry lake bed out here in California. Can't imagine it's like that out in New Mexico.... Must be nice!

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Use a quad and learn how to recognize chondrites. With spotting you will cover more ground in a day than you would using a metal detector even if it has a huge coil.

Iron meteorites are extremely rare and make up less than 5% of the meteorite finds, the vast majority are chondrites. Why spend a lifetime passing up chondrites looking for that one extremely rare iron meteorite?

Yeah that technique might work great out at Brenham or maybe even Glorietta (if the terrain wasn't so steep) but realistically it's probably a waste of time on any dry lake bed.

Martin, BLM would be on you like flies on s$%t if you tried dragging that thing on a dry lake bed out here in California. Can't imagine it's like that out in New Mexico.... Must be nice!

No way it would work at Glorieta. Not unless you maneuvered that thing around all the trees and rocks and such. We are using a 40" coil but you would be peeing in a strong breeze trying to drive that around all the trees, rocks and cliffs and downed snags. Heck, the trees on most of the strewn field are too close together for that thing to drive between. And most of the meteorites are down under brush and rocks that have not already been found.

Besides, the first time you suggested driving an ATV over every square inch of gound turning all over the place you would get run off in a heartbeat. You wouldn't get permission anyway.

I think it just complicates matters all the way around. I find irons every day I am out with a detector but I have serious doubts about finding one with an ATV unless you were in an iron strewn field in a flat area. that you could grid with the ATV.

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No way it would work at Glorieta. Not unless you maneuvered that thing around all the trees and rocks and such. We are using a 40" coil but you would be peeing in a strong breeze trying to drive that around all the trees, rocks and cliffs and downed snags. Heck, the trees on most of the strewn field are too close together for that thing to drive between. And most of the meteorites are down under brush and rocks that have not already been found.

Besides, the first time you suggested driving an ATV over every square inch of gound turning all over the place you would get run off in a heartbeat. You wouldn't get permission anyway.

Thank you Bob, this just helps emphasize the point I'm trying to get across.

I think it just complicates matters all the way around. I find irons every day I am out with a detector but I have serious doubts about finding one with an ATV unless you were in an iron strewn field in a flat area. that you could grid with the ATV.

So Bob you find Iron meteorites EVERY DAY you're out with a metal detector huh? WOW... That certainly defies all odds and is extrememly rare considering only 9% of the classified meteorites from New Mexico are irons according to the Met. Bull. Sheesh with odds like this you MUST be scoring cold finds everytime you go out! Personally I'd like to see some proof of your iron meteorite finds with in-situ pics before I believe you because the odds certainly aren't in your favor to find that many. If you are finding that many then your one heck of a lucky guy and should probably play the lottery if you haven't won it already.

Del

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First things first... the coil so light it barely leaves a mark and I do not drive over vegetation just sandy hard pan or dry lake beds. The ATV tires leave more marks than coil.

As for meteorites the small kind do not impress me. I was born and raised in Arizona and familiar with the landscape. Gold Basin and Franconia are not are to find. This is where I would go if I really enjoyed finding the small stuff.

Note my coil can see a fairly large iron object at nearly 3 feet and I am satisfied with that depth. If I wanted to go deeper I know how to do it.

As for finding the terrain to pull a coil over that is not easy in New Mexico so much of the time my wife and just walk around using sticks with magnets duck tapped to the end.

We also use our metal detectors on the side of county roads where the graders have stacked the rock. Our favorite search area is exactly where the aliens landed some 60 years back.

Our biggest problem is we can not find any solid research in our local area so we are always searching blind.

Finding the one big meteorite is my life's ambition and I enjoy chasing a phantom and especially building the electronics.

I would like to report on my last outing I did find several dozen pellet size meteorites very similar to what Bedrock Bob was describing. I also sent them to UNM for classification. I have a hard time believing UNM returned them with such a nasty note. I do want to thank Bedrock Bob for making me aware of these new kind of meteorites. Note Bedrock when I tried to melt these pellets down the neighbors called the cops because of the foul aroma.

sundownr

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Sundownr, for places to go and hunt in New Mexico go to the Meteoritical Societies database located here-

Met. Bull.

Select "places", type in "new mexico", select the United States as a country and select "Search!". You should get 221 records for New Mexico. Copy the coordinates for each find and put them into your GPS as waypoints. This will give you some places to start. Pay close attention to Roosevelt county because lots of meteorites have been found there!

Here's some New Mexico strewnfields to research-

Correo

Portales Valley

Glorieta Mountain

Pasamonte

You should be able to find information on all these strewnfields with some online research. Wherever you decide to go just make sure you know where you are and the status of the land your hunting. If your on private property make sure you get permission.

The point I'm trying to emphasize is that Iron and stony iron meteorites are rare and statistically speaking you have a higher probability of finding chondrites than anything else. If you want to find a meteorite your best bet would be to focus your efforts on finding chondrites because there are way more out there than irons and stony irons. If you learn how to hunt and recognize chondrites the others will take care of themselves in time.

Hope this helps!

Del

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So Bob you find Iron meteorites EVERY DAY you're out with a metal detector huh? WOW... That certainly defies all odds and is extrememly rare considering only 9% of the classified meteorites from New Mexico are irons according to the Met. Bull. Sheesh with odds like this you MUST be scoring cold finds everytime you go out! Personally I'd like to see some proof of your iron meteorite finds with in-situ pics before I believe you because the odds certainly aren't in your favor to find that many. If you are finding that many then your one heck of a lucky guy and should probably play the lottery if you haven't won it already.

Del

You honestly thought I was trying to say I found a cold find every time I picked up the detector? That is pretty bizzare.

I was talking about Glorieta. Take it easy guy. Yeah, I find irons every day that I detect in Glorieta. That is really not such a tall order. So stay calm. Breathe. And be polite!

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I would like to report on my last outing I did find several dozen pellet size meteorites very similar to what Bedrock Bob was describing. I also sent them to UNM for classification. I have a hard time believing UNM returned them with such a nasty note. I do want to thank Bedrock Bob for making me aware of these new kind of meteorites. Note Bedrock when I tried to melt these pellets down the neighbors called the cops because of the foul aroma.

sundownr

:yuk-yuk: :yuk-yuk: :yuk-yuk: Hey Sundownr. There are a lot of papers available on the area from Clovis to Hobbs. And getting permission would be easy. The perfect place to use your ATV too. Nice and flat. Especially in the winter time. If you dig really deep you can get some bulletin reports that have some killer info. If I can get any url's from my papers on that area I will PM you.

If I was in Roswell and wanted to find a big iron I would look at Tinnie and Arabella. Pallasite man, and right in your neck of the woods! I KNOW I have info on these and I even know a fellow in Arabella that found hisself a meteorite. Several irons have been found in the are between Tinney and Arabella over the years. If your wife cooks maybe we ought to take a looksee around there one of these days?

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Bedrock if you have the time and information come on down and I will put you up in my RV and we will do some serious meteorite hunting. In exchange for the information and field training maybe I can teach you how to play serious nine ball. :thumbsupanim

Del... thanks for the link. Looks like a great resource. I wish the information was in a excel spreadsheet so it would be easier to sort out but it is good stuff none-the-less.

sundownr

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Sundownr,

I have a similar philosophy as you do on the meteorite gig. I have found Franconia, Gold Basin, Holbrook, Glorieta and the hunts have always been a hoot. But the rocks are small and the novelty wears off quickly. I want a BIG ONE. At least as big as your head. And just studded with olivine. A steel fruitcake. That is my criteria for thrilling.

A guy hunting for chondrites on a lake bed will probably not find too many pallasites the size of your head, but he will find a bevy of chondrites. I think a fellow that looks for big irons in places where big irons have been found will not find too many chondrites, but he stands a lot more chance of finding a big iron. Who knows if either one will find what he is looking for and the odds of finding a meteorite are a hell of a lot better for the man looking for chondrites. But if you can figure out how to employ some robotic help to aid in the search then you have a lot better chance I suppose.

If'n you could float a coil across a big area on steep hillsides (but not a lot of trees) you could probably find a big iron or a "loud" H type chondrite in several places in New Mexico. There have been some whoppers in the NE part of the state, as well as between Grants and Gallup. And what Dell said is true about irons being rare. That is why it is so odd that we have clusters of iron meteorites found in New Mexico. There are at least six iron meteorite finds between Grants and Gallup and four around Tinney and Arabella. And the number and size of specimens found suggest a lot more pieces could be there in both places.

And I dont know what kind of PI you have but if you cant pull the coil behind the ATV you can sling it over the shoulders of a teenager and put a GPS monitor on him. That is how we are working it and things are going along swimmingly. Besides, a good ATV will cost you $5K and teenagers are pretty cheap these days. If you plan on hunting in the malpais around the ice caves this spring I suggest bringing a spare teenager or two becasue you will probably lose one and break another. :yuk-yuk:

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Check this out... it is a Google map of New Mexico listing all classified meteorites on record with the Meteorological Society. Click on any blue marker for information.

Go to Google Maps then copy and paste the below url into the search box.

http://www.lpi.usra....goog=yes&dense=

Anybody can do this for any state in the US.

For the bee bee hunters in Arizona try this url :hahaha: :hahaha: :hahaha:

http://www.lpi.usra....goog=yes&dense=

Thanks again Del... as far as mapping goes it does not get any better than this. :thumbsupanim :thumbsupanim :thumbsupanim

The pix below is a copy of what you will see on Google Maps.

sundownr

post-23785-0-76947600-1291763996_thumb.p

post-23785-0-51698700-1291769153_thumb.p

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Way to go sundownr your learning and thats what these forums are good for. I've attached a gpx file (rename the extension to .gpx) that has most of the classified New Mexico meteorites. It hasn't been updated in a couple years and is probably missing a few meteorites but most are in there. If you see something that isn't in there just let me know and I'll update it when I get the time.

Bob technically Glorieta Mountain meteorites aren't "iron" meteorites.... They're Pallasites which puts them into the stony-iron category. This is why I was questioning your claims of finding "iron" meteorites every time you go out. Funny thing is stony-iron meteorites are even more rare than irons but since New Mexico has the Glorieta strewnfield you guys get to hunt them. Must be nice!

Sheesh guys, I've got two weeks off at the end of the month and with all this talk of New Mexico meteorites I'm tempted to drive out there and spend some time hunting. So far I've only got one New Mexico meteorite under my belt and it would be cool to get more.

Del

New Mexico Meteorites.txt

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Del

I went to http://www.gpsvisual...orm=googleearth and converted your gpx file into a klm file then pasted the url of the klm file into the search box on Google Maps.

Here is the url to paste ====> http://www.gpsvisual...orm=googleearth

Except for the markers your map is very similar to the what the Meteorological Society has posted.

I have included a pix of your map and the Meteorological Society map for comparison.

Google Maps has some amazing stuff once you learn how to use it... perfect for meteorite hunters.

Your welcome to stay in my RV if you visit Roswell... problem is, according to your maps, we would have to drive a ways to get into known meteorite country.

sundownr

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post-23785-0-93004700-1291819446_thumb.p

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Hi Sundowner and All

I really like your rig but I think your on the wrong track :huh: . Living in Roswell just put on your tin foil hat and hunt Hub Corns property for space craft parts :mellow: !! Imagine how much a front fender, rear bumper, or turn signal for a 1947 ufo might be worth :rolleyes: !! On a serious note with that setup look for Stony iron or Iron meteorites in know find locations or start a recycling metals business :o . Cause your fixing to dig lots of deep trash :shrug: . Check into the Tinny (sp?) meteorite, I know little about it other than that it's an ataxite (iron)from NM :hmmmmm: . Happy Huntin John B.

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Way to go sundownr your learning and thats what these forums are good for. I've attached a gpx file (rename the extension to .gpx) that has most of the classified New Mexico meteorites. It hasn't been updated in a couple years and is probably missing a few meteorites but most are in there. If you see something that isn't in there just let me know and I'll update it when I get the time.

Bob technically Glorieta Mountain meteorites aren't "iron" meteorites.... They're Pallasites which puts them into the stony-iron category. This is why I was questioning your claims of finding "iron" meteorites every time you go out. Funny thing is stony-iron meteorites are even more rare than irons but since New Mexico has the Glorieta strewnfield you guys get to hunt them. Must be nice!

Sheesh guys, I've got two weeks off at the end of the month and with all this talk of New Mexico meteorites I'm tempted to drive out there and spend some time hunting. So far I've only got one New Mexico meteorite under my belt and it would be cool to get more.

Del

Del,

Most Glorietas have no olivine. They are siderites. An "iron" meteorite. I dont want to split hairs with you but we all know what we are talking about here. Unless what you find has olivine in it is it NOT a pallasite. I couldnt call a Glorieta siderite with nary a speck of olivine a pallasite and a Glorieta siderite is definitely an "iron meteorite".

So lets get real. If it has olivine it is a Pallasite and if it does not it is an "iron".

...And we have five of those pallasite critters here. Three of which have subsequent finds after the original discovery. Glorieta, Arabella, Dora, Acomita and Kingston.

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I think any idea is a great idea if it works. That ATV with your get up would do great in my flat pasture. Sure would save alot of walking.

:rolleyes:

If I had fields to work it would take minor changes to pull the coil behind a farm implement while working the field. In fact I would make the coil much wider. The coil I have now is small (40 inches in width) so it will fit into the back of pickup truck. Believe me the coil works as well as any good metal detector coil should. The electronics I built from a electronic kit I found online. And yes... the whole point of dragging coils is to save time and walking. The only problem is you need smooth ground to work with and few trees or shrubs. Most pastures would be an ideal place to drag a coil.

Good hunting...

sundownr

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