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help please! gold geology a billion diffrent rocks ?


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OK I am a beginner got my first detector mine-lab x Terra 705. I am hunting in pike national forest in Colorado. On my way there I can see so many different rocks because all the roads are cut into the mountains leaving a sheer face of the rock. So my eyes hurt by the time I get where I am going because I am looking at all these rocks. :ph34r2:

Now I have read Bill's articles on the geology of gold and thought to myself "hey this sounds pretty easy just look for a certain geology like fault lines and quartz and your set". Well I found nothing but junk so far. Only been out two times but found bullets and such tiny stuff I didn't think a detector could find like a piece of aluminum just a few millimeters wide.

My Question:

What sort of situation am I looking for when I see all these rocks?confused0082[1].gif I must say geology just became very very interesting now that you throw finding gold into everything. I got a bad feeling I got the fever.Christz_pillepalle[1].gif

You know what would be nice is a gallery for people like me of rocks. So I can see what I am looking for when I am finally outside hunting.

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Howdy Gold Striker-

Welcome to the best hobby ever...prospecting for gold. We all have a million questions when we first start out, and at times, becoming competent in the field can seem to be an overwhelming task. But with research and practice you will get a handle on it. In your post you wrote "You know what would be nice is a gallery for people like me of rocks."

Here is a link to a mineral database that I found very helpful>>>Database

Good luck!

Jason

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I know exactly where you are coming from and there are indeed several books out there that can help, but there is no substitute for time in the field in known gold placer areas. I learned by reading and by joining a club (Roadrunners), getting out on the claims and learning where gold was found in my state as well as what the surrounding geology should look like in a gold producing area.

Go where placer gold has been found before in your state to get a jump start on the learning curve.

I took me some time to learn how to find new areas to hunt on my own but that time did come and I still look for where the "old timers" hunted then branch out for missed areas or gold they simply missed for a variety of reasons.

Once you have stowed some solid field experience into your head you can start using that knowledge to find those secret patches others have missed.

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Thanks guys I will check those links. I feel a little foolish I must say going out into the middle of nowhere to look for something that may or may not be there. I can't wait to see how many new people your gonna see walking around the country side after gold hits 4k-5k oz!happy0045[1].gif

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Thanks guys I will check those links. I feel a little foolish I must say going out into the middle of nowhere to look for something that may or may not be there. I can't wait to see how many new people your gonna see walking around the country side after gold hits 4k-5k oz!happy0045[1].gif

You know I am looking at stuff online. It seems like YOU MIGHT COME ACROSS GOLD ORE AND NOT EVEN KNOW IT ! Alot of the ores I looked at I could never tell there was gold in it. I wonder if my detector would go off on a piece of ore.

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You know I am looking at stuff online. It seems like YOU MIGHT COME ACROSS GOLD ORE AND NOT EVEN KNOW IT ! Alot of the ores I looked at I could never tell there was gold in it. I wonder if my detector would go off on a piece of ore.

I've wondered the same thing....especially with ores like Sylvanite and Calaverite, apparently common through the CO mineral belt...Does a detector sound off on these ores? Apparently they can contain from 20 to 60 percent Au...but even after seeing various photos of each, I'm still sure I'd walk right over them...

Thanks,

Dan

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Thanks David,

Great Links....The first time I had seen Calaverite described as looking similar to pyrite....looks like I need to do some roasting on some samples...

Still curious if a detector would sound on tellurides...

Thanks again,

Dan

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Another thing bugs me now. I am looking at google earth and trying to see if there is some common pattern or correlation between the diffrent places in Colorado where major discoveries have been found. Now I have read it happens near faults when water gets in and dissolves the lode and brings it up to the surface and deposits it. I also read that if happens during an igneous intrusion event. I am also looking at the rock type in say blackhawk central city and telluride and I cripple creek.

I don't understand since if there were a hard and fast rule then one could just look for the geologic clues and find what they were looking for. Just seems like all those clues don't really add up to gold.

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Thanks guys I will check those links. I feel a little foolish I must say going out into the middle of nowhere to look for something that may or may not be there. I can't wait to see how many new people your gonna see walking around the country side after gold hits 4k-5k oz!happy0045[1].gif

Yeah, but they'll be so poor they won't be toting a 4k-5k detector :ROFL:

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You know I am looking at stuff online. It seems like YOU MIGHT COME ACROSS GOLD ORE AND NOT EVEN KNOW IT ! Alot of the ores I looked at I could never tell there was gold in it. I wonder if my detector would go off on a piece of ore.

I have a piece of gold ore I detected out near Indio, CA. I tried balancing it out and it wouldn't, and finally decided to bring it home and had someone look at it. Turns out it's got some Au in it... enough to sound off. I broke off a piece and it didn't sound, so the host isn't reflecting the waves right.

It can happen.

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I got a bad feeling I will see gold all over but never know it! lolangry-smiley-010[1].gif I found on another forum others asking the same question. I am gonna need to get me an assaying contact locally so I can send him bits of rock to test as I go.

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We all have that fear... it's what keeps us looking!

If you worry too much about what's IN the rocks, you'll never find the stuff that you're walking right over.

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Gold_Striker

Here is an idea... I believe in the town of Buena Vista Colorado there is a small rock shop that sells samples of Gold Ore/ Tellurides swing by there and pick up a small piece of it and drag it along when you are out doing some prospecting.... :thumbsupanim But if you are along the Arkansas River there is a pretty good placer location there for your standard nuggets and fines. When I was up in Colorado about 1 1/2 years ago I got a buddy of mine into prospecting with the GPAA club up there on Mothersday weekend. He wanted to know everything about Gold and I was just a newbie so that is what we did. If you are looking for areas that you can prospect in Colorado get with one of the local clubs and have one of the old timers get you up to speed. The ones that we met at their outing that weekend where more than happy to show off all their goodies. In fact we spent more time shooting the breeze then we did digging up the gold, and we did find some that day but Household 6 said be back in time for dinner or we where not going to eat...Hmmm Food or Gold...( :stupidrb: we forgot to pack a lunch :tisk-tisk: and know where the better halfs would have put us if we missed chow) :inocent:

Very Respectfully

RANGERMG

Tim

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If your in previously known gold districts,have the right detector,are going slow and low and put your coil over it..no problem :yuk-yuk: Are you reading all the mining reports,histories of the areas your hunting in?It is also possible to take samples from the quartz veins you come across.Wouldn't worry about tellurides of gold..if something looks out of the ordinary,interesting ...take it home.Think of all the thousands of beepers in the world looking for the yellow..some find quartz gold species occasionaly..do they follow up on the vein/reef that shed those species...sample the vein itself,the dirt on either side..down/uphill?surely thousands of fellows have walked over/around the yellow right under their feet..perhaps too deep for a detector to pick up...or the thousands of ounces of fine gold that metal detectors won't pick up at all.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I can say I am already learning from you guys.confused0083[1].gif Thanks for all your help so far. happy0199[1].gif

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I got a bad feeling I will see gold all over but never know it! lolangry-smiley-010[1].gif I found on another forum others asking the same question. I am gonna need to get me an assaying contact locally so I can send him bits of rock to test as I go.

Hey GS!

This is the way I found my first hardrock gold. I went to a hardrock gold area (on BLM land) and went to learn and not to prospect. This opens up a hell of a lot of territory to you. I observed a line of shafts along a geological structure and looked at the sides of the mine and the rock on the piles. I could plainly see that one side of the workings was the grey rock that I was seeing everywhere (the country rock) and the other was a completely different reddish rock. The records that I researched said the gold was located "in quartz veins along a contact zone between devonian percha shale and Vick's peak andesite". So now I know that grey country rock is andesite and that reddish stuff they are calling shale.

So I went to the mine dump and started observing the piles of rocks. You could readily see the "chispas" (or chips in English)of broken quartz vein where they had been hand sorting it. After looking at a million pieces I noticed that some were laced with a black sooty vein in the "teeth" of the quartz. They were the rarest quartz rock on the dump. I whipped out that mining bulletin I had purchased from the Bureau of Mines and it said that "the richer ores had free gold and were rich in manganese".

Dammit man! I now know what manganese looks like!

(About this time you will need to get permission to tinker around. Make sure you get it from whomever you need to.)

Now I collected a double handfull of this manganese filled quartz vein and crush them. I use an axle from a 64 Ford Fairlane as a mortar and a knuckle from a Toyota Landcruiser for a pestle. I crush it and screen it with a window screen until it all goes through. Then I pan it. I see the "platinum or silver" looking metal too but when you pass a magnet over it it will dissappear because it is good old Detroit steel from the Fairlane. I dont see any color.

But I keep trying until my back is sore from picking up buckets of this dang rock and pounding them to dust. About the time the blood is dripping off my elbows from gripping that axle I see gold.

At that point your eye will get better at "seeing" that ore, your hands will get tough around that axle and the crushing goes quickly, and the learning curve gets steeper. You can generally get as much weight in a day hardrocking in a good area as you can drywashing a good area. And while a lot of big specimen gold is found in hardrock float I think there are POUNDS of fine gold out there just laying around that wont beep a detector but are just loaded with particles. At least that has been my experience in the areas in S. New Mexico.

Maybe that will give you some clues to run with. There seem to be a lot of ore questions going around and I am just fascinated with it. Maybe this helps. I have a few buckets of ore with some really nice rough gold in it and would love to crush it up and post some photos. Maybe in a few days I will have the time.

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I've wondered the same thing....especially with ores like Sylvanite and Calaverite, apparently common through the CO mineral belt...Does a detector sound off on these ores? Apparently they can contain from 20 to 60 percent Au...but even after seeing various photos of each, I'm still sure I'd walk right over them...

Thanks,

Dan

I have a bottle of coarse "wires" of Sylvanite from Granite Gap in Hidalgo Co. NM. It will sound the GBII just like you think it would. But sylvanite wires are pretty rare I think. I have seen sylvanite ore as "black quartz" with a few micro wires in the voids of the sample. I dont think too much native sylvanite or any "placer sylvanite" exists above ground would it?

There are nuggets there that they call "Sylvanite" but they are actually argentine placer gold.

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