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Hey Garimpo

Hope all is well and hows the Toy? We've been busy workin on an f350 one ton and its ready to go to California(3000 miles from Pennsyltuckey) the only thing is that its 2 wheel drive and we're thinkin about throwin a strait axle under the front and get a transfer case to fit the 7.3 diesel and convert it.Any ideas? Regards Phil

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If I was a mech and doing the work I would go for a locker up front...just sits there

until the front axle is engaged....then a posi-traction in the rear...a camper shell on

the bed and you've got a prospectors dream....nice looking 350 what year is it? Any room

underneath for a reserve fuel tank?

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The main issue with a locker up front is it kills the turn radius. I have ARB airlockers front and rear on my truck and sometimes when the front is engaged, wheels turned and the truck continues straight ahead. Being unlocked and only lock when needed has been great. Lockers in the rear are a real treat on icy roads too. Just a heads up

Claytargethntr

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If I was a mech and doing the work I would go for a locker up front...just sits there

until the front axle is engaged....then a posi-traction in the rear...a camper shell on

the bed and you've got a prospectors dream....nice looking 350 what year is it? Any room

underneath for a reserve fuel tank?

Hi Garimpo

No payments filldtank here,got our eye open for a shell and we got two tanks might be room for a third,the clocks been around a few times on the 1991 but she's tight,replaced alot of parst and had brake problems thats how we got her,brake chatter and poor braking,what a job.Regards Phil

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  • 1 month later...

To convert it, it won't be too hard, since the 4x4 version uses the same frame. Even the holes are already there. However, it won't be free or a short project and you'll need some tools and know how.

Find a wrecked one (preferrably rear end wreck) and pull the tranny, transfer case, axle and all suspension and steering - including brackets and shifters - out.

To get the rivets out, use a cutting wheel on a die grinder to cut an X in the rivet and an air chisel to knock the head off. Then use the punch bit for the air hammer and push the rivet out of the bracket and frame.

The reason to get the drivetrain from tranny - out is because the output housing and shaft of the trannies are different for 4WD versus 2WD (except in the instance of most divorced transfer cases that use a short jack-shaft between the two.

You'll also have the area in the floorpan to punch through for the t-case shifter from the factory, but it will likely need to be cut out by you. At least you'll have a guide.

It can be done, but it's a job, for sure. The above is the cheapest way, and will all be factory-fit. It will also be relatively easy for someone with skills, except for finding an intact drivetrain of that vintage.

The other route is to pick up a used Dana 60 front, main steering linkage pieces and some new springs, then parts-store it for the ends and joints. Then you go to a company like Advance Adapters or Novak Conversions for adapters and such to put in something like an Atlas II (from Advance) for the bullet-proof t-case route.

You'll still need to get new driveshafts and do some fab work and source the suspension brackets from somewhere like Ballistic Fab or Blue Torch Fabworks.

Any competent shop should be able to have you in and out in a few days to a week, if all parts are there and ready to go.

If you can wait till you get down to Central AZ I can make sure you're taken care of right :)

I second to the eleventy-billionth degree the use of selectable lockers such as the ARB air locker or Eaton E-Locker for the front (and the read for that matter). These old trucks aren't known for their steering radius and putting an automatic locker in the front will be akin to taking out your steering and using the rotational force of the Earth to turn the rig.

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GlennM you certainly said a mouth full here:

These old trucks aren't known for their steering radius and putting an automatic locker in the front will be akin to taking out your steering and using the rotational force of the Earth to turn the rig.

My 1986 Toyota can do a u-turn but I have to start the turn on the far outside of a

four lane street with a wide divider down the middle....

Really put the LockRites through a test Mon. and Tues.....they worked wonders in

rocks...gravel and deep muddy ruts...still hard for me to get used to hearing the

clicking they make...I just wonder how long it's going to take for the "nubs" to

wear down.....

I have one important question about my totally new transfer case...even the case

is new but twice while in the bad stuff....once going up hill and once going down

hill the transfer case slipped out of gear....is it adjustable or is there a fix?

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  • 2 weeks later...

Garimpo,

Sorry it took me so long to get back to this.

T-case popping out can be due to several reasons (in order of severity/common occurrence):

1. Toyotas of that vintage use a heavy-duty rubber shift boot for the t-case. These have been known to pull the case out of 4-Low on Uphill and Downhills, especially with worn/older tranny and engine mounts in place. The lurching in 4-Low casues the drivetrain to move A LOT. The test for this is to pull the boot off and try the spot where it popped out before. if it doesn't pop out with the boot off, there are a couple of fixes:

Cut or hammer the floor out of the way of the shifter and reinstall the boot

Flip the boot backwards (not sure why this works, but it does)

This problem is common and almost always the culprit on these trucks

2. Worn or loose transmission/t-case mount adn/or engine mounts

Replace all mounts as they wear against each other and a new tranny mount will wear out faster with older engine mounts

3. Frame flex pulling the shifter out, which is typically an adjustment item. But the worst can be due to a cracked frame! :scare:

This is similar to #1, but is typically a linkage adjustment. I put it as most severe because of the possible worst case scenario of frame cracks.

As for the steering, you can adjust the steering stops a thread or two. they are the bolts on the knuckle that make contact with the axle housing during full lock turns. Don't go too far or you'll over-extend the Birfield joints. Just always keep in mind: An axle joint is strongest in a straight line and exponentially weaker the further the steering is turned while under power or in a bind.

That ratcheting sound you hear will be there for a long while. Make sure you have the correct weight gear oil in there and, if you can afford it, use a quality synthetic gear oil. The stuff makes a huge difference in the longevity of motor vehicle parts, especially gears.

Happy hunting and Happy belated Birthday!

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