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Greetings.

I am looking for someone experienced to cut a few slices from some meteorites amd a few suspect rocks.

Does anyone have any recommendations in the Southern California area? (I am in the Palm Springs area.)

Any input would be greatly appreciated...:-)

Thanks!

Daryl

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Daryl...I also live in the Palm Springs area. Being a new hunter, I don't know anything about cutting, but I have a question for you. Do you know of any meteorites having been found around the Coachella Valley, or in Joshua Tree National Park? Karl

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Daryl...I also live in the Palm Springs area. Being a new hunter, I don't know anything about cutting, but I have a question for you. Do you know of any meteorites having been found around the Coachella Valley, or in Joshua Tree National Park? Karl

Hey, neighbor.

I will PM or email you a response.

Regards,

Daryl

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D-Sil,

I would think a diamond bladed tile cutter would work....most are water cooled..... Just a thought.

wonderer

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D-Sil,

I would think a diamond bladed tile cutter would work....most are water cooled..... Just a thought.

wonderer

wonderer, you are correct, as that is exactly what I used to cut the rock pictured here: Mystery Rock?

The problem is the kerf is so wide that the waste is excessive, almost equal to the weight of the cut sample.

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Yes, "Wet" tile saws will cut meteorites. They have a built-in "cheap" coolant system (water) and they're an inexpensive alternative to expensive lapidary equipment. Stone meteorites technically are just rocks with little bits of iron in them, so a good wet tile or masonry saw will cut them with ease, only your blades will dull just a little bit faster is all due to the iron. Which is the case with any saw blade you use for cutting meteorites.

A wet tile saw works, but throw away the blade that came with it. The cut loss is too great on the factory blades. Don't EVER use them unless you don't care about cut loss. Buy yourself an MK or other good quality diamond lapidary blade. I personally like the Barranca Diamond 301 .025 lapidary blade. It works well and leaves a nice cut surface which requires less sanding/polishing. When I'm cutting really small stuff, or classified meteorites, I like to use my thin .012 kerf "Meteorite" blade. It's super thin, has minimal loss, and makes even smoother cuts. Also, the slower you cut, the smoother the cut even on the thicker blades.

I know professionals who use wet tile saws and masonry/metal chop saws to cut meteorites. They work just fine; with the right blades. It's really NOT about the saw, it's about the blade you use. You don't "need" specialty lapidary equipment to "cut" meteorites. Save money on your saw, spend the money on the blades. You'll save 50% or more over expensive lapidary equipment, and with the savings you can buy more blades and more meteorites.

Now so I don't get yelled at by all the professional lapidary dudes out there. Lapidary equipment has it's purpose and you do need some specialty equipment when cutting, prepping, sanding, polishing, buffing etc. In my opinion there's 4 saws within the price range of the hobbyist that are good for cutting meteorites. Notice I didn't include wire saws. Wire Saws are for a whole different professional level of cutting I'm not familiar with, there are a few pros who use them. They are expensive ($20k-$30k) and aren't for the novice.

DISCLAIMER: Do not cut meteorites! Cut meteorites at your own risk!

Small 'WET" Tile Saw for small material - Hobbyist

Medium Chop Saw for mid sized meteorites

Large Band Saw for big iron and stone meteorites

Large 10" to 20" Slab Saw

Slab Saws are expensive, but you can find them used for bargain prices) I've seen them used for $350 to $1500 depending on brand and condition.

Hope this helps...

Regards,

Eric

P.S. By the way, I'm just north of San Diego in Escondido.

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Daryl,

Thanks for the email and info. I have hunted most of the southern Cal. dry lakes, except for Coyote, which I'd really like to visit but can't seem to find the right road to get there with my car. I'm heading to Franconia and Gold Basin in 2 weeks. Thanks again.

Karl

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Good luck at both of those places, and take lots of water. For Franconia, watch out for snakes, they are definitely out this time of year. Gold Basin too, but I have yet to see one there. Jason ;)

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Welcome Karl; it is nice to see you herein, there is a ton of info and the very finest sorts if they will come out to play...

BEWARE of hunting in state parks, national parks and other special areas....

Eric , we are practically neighbors....

see y'all in a month or so.

Fred

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Karl: Give me a call if you want. I'll PM my number.

Eric: Thanks for the info. I read your post on Met List awhile ago where you noted your tips and tricks on cutting. Very informative. I want you to know that I did email you, prior to posting here, but rec'd no response. In the future, I hope to be able to use your cutting services.

I ended up putting a dremel tool with a diamond blade in a vise, and having the spousal unit spray distilled water on the blade as I cut various samples to send to the lab. Much to my surprise, it actually worked.

As noted above, I borrowed a tile saw for cutting an unidentified rock that is 2.5" in height: Big Rock

Best regards,

Daryl

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Karl: Give me a call if you want. I'll PM my number.

Eric: Thanks for the info. I read your post on Met List awhile ago where you noted your tips and tricks on cutting. Very informative. I want you to know that I did email you, prior to posting here, but rec'd no response. In the future, I hope to be able to use your cutting services.

I ended up putting a dremel tool with a diamond blade in a vise, and having the spousal unit spray distilled water on the blade as I cut various samples to send to the lab. Much to my surprise, it actually worked.

As noted above, I borrowed a tile saw for cutting an unidentified rock that is 2.5" in height: Big Rock

Best regards,

Daryl

Hi Daryl, You're welcome for the info, and so sorry for not responding to your email from the Met-List. I must have missed it. I literally get hundreds of emails "per day" I have to sift through, totally my fault for missing it. I wasn't ignoring you. If you have any questions, just send them over, and I'll try to help as best I can, if I can;t answer something, I'll refer you to someone who can. I'm always available to help.

Talk to you soon...

Fred, Where's my neighbor? ;) You live close to Escondido? L.A. maybe? ;) I know there's a more of us meteorite huntin' types down these parts on SoCal, but I only know of a couple.

Regards,

Eric

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