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Dry Washer Tips


Rudy

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I just went out and ran a used dry washer I picked a couple of years ago. Anybody have some tips that would shorten the "learning curve" How often to you stop and clean up? what amount of dirt can this handle, it's an older Keene with a motor/blower set up. Thanks !

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I just went out and ran a used dry washer I picked a couple of years ago. Anybody have some tips that would shorten the "learning curve" How often to you stop and clean up? what amount of dirt can this handle, it's an older Keene with a motor/blower set up. Thanks !

It's been my experience that 2 things are to be observed . 1) After about 10 or 15 minutes of shoveling in your first spot you need to clean up and do a "quick check" of what you have . If you have gold then carry on . If not ...move . 2) When you see you're shoveling and all the riffles are full of black sand then there is precious little chance of any more gold to stop and settle . Clean up .

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Open your unit and see ifn' ya got a adjustable weight attached to the fan assembly. Makes a world of difference on angles,pitch,feed rates and MOST of all recovery. Then buy the best face mask you can afford to save your lungs from Valley Fever,crud,crappola and destruction-tons a au 2 u 2 -John :miner:

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Open your unit and see ifn' ya got a adjustable weight attached to the fan assembly. Makes a world of difference on angles,pitch,feed rates and MOST of all recovery. Then buy the best face mask you can afford to save your lungs from Valley Fever,crud,crappola and destruction-tons a au 2 u 2 -John :miner:

I hate dust masks and respirators,though I do know their all about benefits. I spent 20 years plus working in the aircraft inDUSTy.

Drywashing is alot like at fishing. Alot of your success comes to knowing when to make a change or move.

You have to know your self if finding grains per hour is enough or you want to find ounces per hour.

The simplest plan is doing lots of sampling to see where the gold is and quantify how much you get in a know amount and record it on a map.

Doing so should help to tell you which way to move to get more. Also with that being said. ?You can play for hows with the feed rate,angle and other adjustments but in reality the single thing that gets more gold is the amount of material you process.

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I really appreciate your responses will share future success, I have used my detector and the "Roto Pan" but the dry washer is a new angle. The "boss" is more generous with time now that the kids are raised. Thanks!

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Hey Rudy, another thing to remember, some areas, around Rich Hill is one of them, even if you screen down to 1/4" you will end up with lots of 1/4" dirt clods. These "clods" can hold an amazing amount of gold! Do your best to get it crushed down before you run it.

I seen a guy this last winter that had a rotary cement mixer and some old mill balls and was crushing all his material before he ran it through his dry washer and was doing VERY well.

Bunk

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Rudy,

All the advise you have gotten so far is very good from those who have learned the hard way. I would like to add a little here for you also.

The system that I use, which has done very well for me, is somewhat time consuming in that I double classify and double run my material. I classify into 3 gal. buckets with a 5/16th classifier, rubbing the material down to break up the clay balls and the chachi. I then place a bucket at the end of my riffle tray to catch the tailings and rerun them again. If I'm prospecting an area, I run 10 buckets from an area about 6 feet wide. If I have color than I'll 10 more. If I have no color, I fill in the hole and move on.

Once I'm into a paying area, I will divide it into 2 foot sections, run each section separately to see where the gold is at the most. Lastly, at the end of the day check your tailing piles with a metal detector. Almost all of use have found gold that others have missed by not checking their tailing piles.

Hope this is somewhat helpful.

Bob :olddude:

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the 151's can handle one person shoveling at a fairly fast rate. Keep an eye on the riffles. If the dirt is flowing over them like water on a sluice your not shoveling too fast. You should have a piece on the hopper to adjust the flow rate or you can adjust the angle of the hopper to allow for faster or slower flow. Once you start losing black sand its time to empty the concentrates. If you are in a good area and pulling decent amounts of gold you probably want to redrywash your tailings. drywashing is not perfect and you can lose 10% or more of your gold the first time around. So if you got 9 grams there is probably 1 gram still in the tailings. good luck and show us some results. Bob

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Here's another "TIDBIT" of info from the peanut gallery, one ol timer told me when you check you're cons while panning if you are seeing the garnets in them MOVE

OVER to the left and the right where you're digging to find more gold. It works I've done it.

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Clean up any time you see black sand over running your riffles!

I let it get over the first three! Or fore!

Your going to find the fine gold in the first two.

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Rudy,

Once I'm into a paying area, I will divide it into 2 foot sections, run each section separately to see where the gold is at the most. Lastly, at the end of the day check your tailing piles with a metal detector. Almost all of use have found gold that others have missed by not checking their tailing piles.

Hope this is somewhat helpful.

Bob :olddude:

As Jim would say..."Follow the Drywashers"....

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Great pamplet,great saying and most of all a great person-Jim Straight-ALWAYS respect-John
Agreed

Rudy if you don't already have this you may want to get a copy. "Successful Drywashing, For the Man Who Wants to Know the Secrects of Successful Drywashing." By Jim Straight it is only about 30 pages but lots of info.

Rich

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The book sounds like what I'm looking for....is there an outfit that supports your efforts so I can throw a little business their way, Thanks

Rudy, Jim Straight is a member of this forum. Send him a message and he will sell you his book. He has many other fine books that many of us will vouch for also. He is one of the old Prospecting Gods. :twocents:

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