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Mystery rocks from au


lemons

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G'day all, my good friend Pedro showed me some scone-scratchers that nobody here can identify.

The green one is about 3"x2" and is not as blue as the image suggests. More green than blue as it appear in the second shot, but that is too dark. I tried to get the color natural but failed.

One of our mates is a gem miner and knows a thing or two about interesting rocks, but he con only say that this rock is a psudomorph. . . whatever than is, kinda not one or the other is my guess.

Here's a bit of help for you: al-0.758, Pb-0.170, Cu-4.82, Bi-0.023, Mo-0.022, Nb-0.020, Zt-0.004 ppm.

Lead shows 1070 ppm, Tin-124, antimony-84 and rubidium=56 ppm. These tests are not complete, but I'm not any wiser for the effort. I would describe its luster as waxy. I is also very hard.

I notice some beads on the close-up image which may be a clue.

It was found on the surface of a granite outcrop north of Kal. No source discovered.

http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e245/dzahed/Rocks/mysteryrock1a.jpg

http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e245/dzahed/Rocks/mysteryrock1b.jpg

The second comes from South Australia around the area of coober pedy, but it may have been transpoted. My mate was given the rock by another miner. He believes this miner had others sinilar.

I think it looks like a bar of soap and we do play tricks by leaving it in the bathromm.

my mate has had it a long time and can't tell anything about except he thought it was a native bees nest. Unlikely I think. It extremely heavy.

Tests: Ba-1048,Sb-135, Sh or Sn-91, Sr-1380. I don't make anything from this info, but perhaps others know.

http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e245/dzahed/Rocks/mysteryrock2c.jpg

http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e245/dzahed/Rocks/mysteryrock2b.jpg

Now, the prize!

One large jar of Vegemite posted to you for your cullinary pleasure.

http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e245/dzahed/Rocks/Vegemite.jpg

lemons

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Hi Mate-

The first stone looks like chrysoprase. It has been found at certain locations in Australia. If you find enough and the quality is good, it could be worth quite a bit. That is a nice looking piece you have...By the way, I don't know why he thinks it's a pseudomorph. The second stone you show in the pictures resembles a pseudomorph more then this one. :twocents: :twocents:

http://www.mindat.org/gallery.php?cform_is_valid=1&min=952&cf_pager_page=1

The second stone resembles common white opal which would make sense since you say it came from an opal mining district. Not all opal is precious with multicolors. Also-pseudomorphs of opal have been found in some of the opal districts. Mostly fossils.... :twocents: :twocents:

I can't make heads or tails of the two analysis you listed. I am only going by appearance.

Steve

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Thanks guys,

the miner who owns these just sold a couple of cwt of that chrysoprase. He has an electronic gadget for testing and the rock disagreed with his sold batch results.

There's a sky-blue material that is harder to see in the image, the gem bloke thinks it's torqoise which is not known in this district. But, we do have ruby, saphfire and opal (precious)around here.

They put another electronic tester on it and those are the composition results for General Metals. Copper features highly on the test results.

Both have quite a bit of radiation too. The soap stone has the highest emmissions. . . according to the test gadget.

The soap-stone is thought to be barrium.

Good on you,I'll point him to the forum. He needs to go back and search again where he found it.

lemons

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Some turquoise has been found in Australia but it's not as nearly as common of an occurrence as chrysoprase is. Glenn Archer is supposed to have found some good quality turquoise someplace in Au and it looks just like turquoise and not chrysophase. So I still say it's chrysophase but I'm just judging by looking at the photo. Besides I don't know what kind of an electronic tester that's on the marketplace that can accurately give the composition of a mineral. I know there's some pretty sophisticated equipment like AS and HPLC that give accurate results but I don't know of any electronic units that can. Maybe I'm just not up date on the latest equipment....

As for the second stone- if that it has a large amount of barium in it- it could be barite but it doesn't look like any barite I've ever seen before. Is that specimen really heavy compared to rocks of a similar size? If not- it's not barite but something else.

Steve

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I'm sure there's someplace in Australia where you can send a sample for expert identification.. It may be a geologist at some university or college. You just have to find out where to send it. Contact the geology dept at your local university.

Steve

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Any silicon or nickel in the green stone? That's the main composition of chrysoprase, it looks like chrysoprase to me from the photos, but I guess lesser known minerals could be possible.

Chrysoprase photos

http://www.themysticeye.com/info/chrysoprase.htm

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I will be the first to say, I don't know anything about it, but wasn't that stone they prised so much when building the pirmids called Lappis? or something like that? It was that color. Grubstake

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steve, yes it is very heavy compared to similar rocks. I am working in ironstone country just now and it feels like high-grade ironstone. It looks like soap on a string and the string has busted off. I wish my freind could remember more but it was twenty-years ago since he received it.

Yes the green/blue may well have an association with chrysoprase. . . the gem guy said.

The sky-blue material looks powdery and he says that is usual for torquois, it polishes up good.

The instrument I haven't seen, but it's a Top-Shelf item which, I believe, knocks electons and atoms around to read their elements. Ya gotta watch out for your nuts when using it I'm told. :arrowheadsmiley: BTW, it also has barrium in the reading ~ 661 ppm

bigrex, the results for precious metals are: Au-0.758, Fe-0.206, Ir-10.22, Zn-0.425, Cu-88.29 ppm.

G'day grubstake, I saw Lapis in northern India years ago. I was told that it came from Afghanistan or Iran. It sure is a pretty stone.

lemons

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Lemons,

take this as definitive, it is indeed Chrysoprase as there are numerous small mines for this material North of Kalgoorlie.

Quality stuff lies under the 10m depth mark. Above this, its often too weathered to use. popular in Asia as a Jade substitute.

The 2nd rock is eluvial Barite. Common on the Eyre Peninsula. Andy

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Nickel is the primary element in chrysoprase. My guess is the method in which it is being tested does not see the nickel due to it being locked up in silica. I maybe wrong but I have purchase a lot of chrysoprase in the past and the rock in question looks identical. I sure would like to get more regardless of the test results.

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I'm not precious rock man. I don't know why it attracts such interest, but it is pretty and abundant here in Australia. I guess it's like any stone. . . there are grades and quallity. . . beyond me.

I've got the final results from tests and Ni does not appear.

How is that?

The test instrument is commonly used to define ore insitu and is reliable.

No Ni does this mean it is a psudomorph?

and. . . whats that worth in spending dollars?

I'm working on him to get back out there and ntry to find more.

lemons

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Lemons,

I have never paid more then $15/lb but greatrough.com sells it for $1.50/gram. I have only purchased directly from the miner so you don’t have all the markups. As for the test results I have no clue.

Ben – Are you ready for a rockhound trip?

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No Ni does this mean it is a psudomorph?

lemons

I think a pseudomorph has more to do with the shape of a particular specimen more then the composition.

If that's not chrysophase, I don't know what it is. It could be a rare mineral that might be worth more as specimerns. You need to send a sample out to a university that has a geology dept for identification.

Steve

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A pseudomorph is a mineral that replaced or filled in the crystal structure of another mineral that was there before, so for example, you might have pyrite pseudomorphs after calcite, meaning the specimen is made of pyrite, but it took on the shape of the calcite it replaced, in a way I guess the concept of a fossil is a little like when a pseudomorph forms. The bone structure of a dead animal is chemically replaced atom by atom with another mineral and it becomes fossilized. Pseudomorphs can also just be an encrustment over another mineral as well.

If your mineral is a pseudomorph maybe it is chrysocolla instead? Did the person say what mineral it was mimicking or taking on the crystal shape of? It still looks like chrysoprase to me.

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