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Gold purity content..?


EbonBetta

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I have read a lot of information about finding gold and the fact that is not all pure. But what I'm wondering is if flour gold is more pure.

Anbody knoow for sure on how that works out ? is an atom of gold ,or what ever its smallest value would be pure ? Are all atoms elements the same size ? and if so how small is 100% pure gold vs 100% som3ething else ?

what will 1 molecule of gold pass through ? Any clue ?

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Keep it simple-gold putity varies from stream to stream/county to county and state to state as geology is/has never been been a exacting science-for all rules there are exceptions--forget the atom bs and go for size-John

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Keep it simple-gold putity varies from stream to stream/county to county and state to state as geology is/has never been been a exacting science-for all rules there are exceptions--forget the atom bs and go for size-John

I agree with John, but to answer one of your questions usually fine gold will be higher in purity than larger gold of the same deposit/area because as the gold get worn down in to fines a lot of the impurities will have been separated that was trapped within the larger gold.

As John stated gold will vary in purity from deposit/areas to deposit/areas and sometimes within the same deposit/area.

The rest of your questions would be better asked of assayers, scientists, geologists and refiners, most prospectors spend most of their time finding and mining gold and leave the finer points to the assayers, scientists, geologists and refiners, and are mostly interested in the end value of their efforts and enjoying the outdoors.

Skip

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"and if so how small is 100% pure gold vs 100% som3ething else ?"

Your question does not have a simple answer, but this may help you to understand. ( ..or just confuse ya ) It takes a lot of study to get the whole picture.

It's not really an issue of "size", it's the density.

Gold being more dense will be smaller in "size" compared to an equal weight of other material, which would be less dense.

Concider a pound of lead to a pound of feathers. They both weigh the same, but the "size" of the area they inhabit will differ greatly. And so goes the density.

You could increase the density of the feathers, but this would reduce it's "size"

Definition: Atomic mass or atomic weight is the average mass of atoms of an element, calculated using the relative abundance of isotopes in a naturally-occurring element.

Also Known As: Atomic Weight

Examples: The atomic mass of carbon is 12.011; the atomic mass of hydrogen is 1.0079

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"and if so how small is 100% pure gold vs 100% som3ething else ?"

Your question does not have a simple answer, but this may help you to understand. ( ..or just confuse ya ) It takes a lot of study to get the whole picture.

It's not really an issue of "size", it's the density.

Gold being more dense will be smaller in "size" compared to an equal weight of other material, which would be less dense.

Concider a pound of lead to a pound of feathers. They both weigh the same, but the "size" of the area they inhabit will differ greatly. And so goes the density.

You could increase the density of the feathers, but this would reduce it's "size"

Definition: Atomic mass or atomic weight is the average mass of atoms of an element, calculated using the relative abundance of isotopes in a naturally-occurring element.

Also Known As: Atomic Weight

Examples: The atomic mass of carbon is 12.011; the atomic mass of hydrogen is 1.0079

I understand you answer but there is an inaccuracy. 1 lb of gold is lighter than 1 lb of feathers.

Gold is measured in troy.

Feathers are measured in advo I cannot spell it today...

troy has 12 ounces

advr has 16 ounces

troy ounces are heavier but not heavy enough to over come the number difference.

My point though was that at 400x the gold still looked huge...So how much magnification do you need to see just gold as pure ?

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No, no, no,....

You missed my point, that being, equal weight does not mean equal area of occupancy.

Put some gold on a balance scale, even the balance in the other tray with feathers.

Now, they weigh the same, but do not occupy equal space.

"My point though was that at 400x the gold still looked huge...So how much magnification do you need to see just gold as pure ?"

This is a deep hole, I hope I don't bury myself in it. LOL

You can have one molicule of gold and one molicule of say silver, that are bonded physically.

If you want to see absolutely pure gold you would view the single molicule. The degree of magnification is not in my head, I'd have to look that up. The greater the magnification, the larger it appears, no matter how small it actually is.

But,.....

Molicules are not "pure" within themselves. They are made up of atoms.

An atom is even made up of separate "material" so to speak. Electrons, neutrons, and nucleus. There is still the space between these that has been theororized to be occupied by "dark matter".

So, in theory anyway, there is no "pure" existance of anything.

Everything is made up of multiple material existance within a defined space.

The physical, as in mathimatics, can always be divided by "2".

No matter how small, it can always be divided in half.

.99 pure gold, 1.0 as being absolute purity, is about all you are going to get.

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Gold does not really form molecules but is made up of a lattice of gold atoms: these could be interpreted as "mono-atomic molecules", in short... atoms!

-Answers.com-

If I were to give you as many atoms of gold as seconds since the big bang, that would amount to a speck of gold weighing 0.14 milligrams and worth 0.21 cents.

Don't know what else I can tell ya. :shrug:

I tried.....hope it helped.

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Gold can be signatured to Geologic areas as to Gold Content and other material contained.

But Who cares and Why would you?

A simple Acid test will tell you the Karat Value and can be sold as the same.

I had some samples tested from here in New Mexico and from two areas, both came up 93% Gold, 3% silver, 2.5% Copper and other. Other being Lead, Bismith and trace other.???

22 Karat is 22-carat, or 91.67% of pure gold.

Most gold sold is on the low side of 1/2 Karat allowed by law.

Gold is Gold! :yuk-yuk:

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Gold can be signatured to Geologic areas as to Gold Content and other material contained.

But Who cares and Why would you?

A simple Acid test will tell you the Karat Value and can be sold as the same.

I had some samples tested from here in New Mexico and from two areas, both came up 93% Gold, 3% silver, 2.5% Copper and other. Other being Lead, Bismith and trace other.???

22 Karat is 22-carat, or 91.67% of pure gold.

Most gold sold is on the low side of 1/2 Karat allowed by law.

Gold is Gold! :yuk-yuk:

With gold being able to be id'd by site. has anybody create a rough map to where gold and it's % come from?

From say randsburg,coolgardie,chocolate mts,29 palms and such...kind of be interesting to see ?

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Almost every state in the union has already done that. Simply look up your state mines & Minerals dept or Geology dept and there are insanely cheap maps, books,reports and exacting information on each and every area(close to 90+%)in most states. Depth to bedrock--kt%--equipment utilized--recovery rates etc etc etc---educate and prosper--John

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Yes John. I was going to say that al minerals, even water wells have been logged, recorded, and all pertinient data tabulized for research. I have no idea how California does it, but here the records are done by the New Mexico Bureau of Mining and Mineral reources (for metallic minerals), the State Enginer's Office (for water, and hyrothermal resources) and the State Land Office (oil, coal, and uranium).

Of course all data is not available, but the details on purity, depth, type of deposit, extent, etc. etc. are fairly complete.

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:thumbsupanim I know it's hard to believe--but kali did something right and went online with the data. Also you can go to Sac and brouse the library and even--changes constantly--can get out of print stuff too. Puts the USGS to shame now with pertinent data and info CHEAP!!!!!!!!!! John
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:thumbsupanim I know it's hard to believe--but kali did something right and went online with the data. Also you can go to Sac and brouse the library and even--changes constantly--can get out of print stuff too. Puts the USGS to shame now with pertinent data and info CHEAP!!!!!!!!!! John

I tried looking at the cali stuff and gave up. I could not figure out how to locate maps for anyplace or get info that made use for me..

Yesterday. I had sent an email which Was listed on the BLM page for ridgecrest,Ca, but it seems the email does Not go to ridgecrest.

Here is there answer to me....

Mr. Gilmore:

You will need to check with the field office that covers your specific area, if you have previously filed a "Plan of Operation" they will review and/or revise said plan. There has been a moratorium on dredging that is still in effect today. The California website has a map on front page, click on area where your claim is and the field office that handles that area will pop up with contact info. www.blm.gov/ca

Thank you,

Bureau of Land Management

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The GIS mapping project here is planning to conslidate all databases into a mappable program. Already you can ask the program questions and get a map as output. In other words I can look for "Desert Mule Deer" and it will draw a map with hbitat, based on rainfall, vegetation, altitude, etc. I can ask for amlost any species of plant, fish or animal, any climate, any rainfall amount, and many other criteria including geologic age. As far as mining goes I can ask for oil, uranium, coal, aggregate mines, etc. and get accurate geospacial data. Once all the NMBMMR mineral data is entered it will generate some interesting maps.

For research it is great! Land ownership and county clerk records are rapidly populating databases. This will allow a researcher to locate every landowner in a strewn field rapidly.

Texas has a big database for oil and gas leases that give land ownership for the ENTIRE STATE. It is a private database but can be had for less than $1000.

So, while the GIS project is not all about minerals and mining, it is a very valuable tool that is getting better each day. For those who entertain conspiracy theories it is a nightmare of information. I guess all progress can be viewed in a lot of ways.

Bob

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