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First find of 2010


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I think its Apache too. If you look at Navajo, they made a bit broader tips. The Apache liked slim heads because they flew straighter, especially when attacking from horseback.

Bob, what is it made of?

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Guest bedrock bob

It is made of Spanish steel. I would say Apache too, judging from where I found it...Upper Pecos River. The Pecos Puebloans probably made steel points too and they lived very near by.

It was in a spot that the Mexicans (or later New Mexicans) kept a day herd of horses. The Apaches would let the caballeros cut horses from the common herd all day rather than wrangle them themselves, and then steal them at night from the day herd. Of course there could be a whole lot of other explanations for where it was found, but I went to the spot with the specific intention of finding a metal point based on what I knew about the area.

It was on a ridge near a river ford where the high canyon walls would make it easy to drive horses away from the lead animals on the river and keep them there for a night or two. Many small camps are on this ridge and they used this topography to help them manage the herd. The Apaches used it too, and I have found a bunch of points here. This is the second metal point from the area.

Of course I am swinging an expensive detector and I spotted both of the metal points by eye long before I got a beep. May as well just take the batteries out and use it as a cane.

Bob

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SHAME ON YOU FOR 20 MINUTES, Pickin up old artifacts off the ground, TISK TISK !!!!

Wish I saw it first !!!

Nice goin Bob good way to start off the New Year I gotta get out and do some huntin soon I've been consumed with my Jeep engine workin on it in a nice toasty garage with the wood stove goin.

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Guest bedrock bob

Hi Bob,

That's a beautiful Spanish point. What a great location with MANY possibilities. Should be more cool stuff in the area.

Ben

You figure it is Spanish? Heck I don’t know! I figured it was Indian but made from Spanish steel. Before about 1850 there was not a hell of a lot of steel in this country and I know the Indians cached the armor and used it to make the points…It was good steel and it was already hammered thin. But who this point belonged to I certainly could not say.

Now very near that spot is Starvation Peak. There is a persistent story that someone chased someone up on that mountain and didn’t let them come down and a lot of folks died from hunger. The Indians say that they chased some Mexicans up there and starved them. The Mexicans say that the Indians were held on the summit until they expired. The Spanish aren’t sure who died up there, but they are pretty sure it was either some Indians or some Mexicans. Anyhoo, there is a local legend of a starvin’ there and I believe it is true because I get hungry just thinking about it.

The peak is on the old Santa Fe trail at Bernal (Ojo Vernal). It just so happens that this is the spot where Lincoln La Paz witnessed the "green lights" back in 1948. It is just over the hill from the spot they collected the “New Mexico Tax” on all the travelers on the Santa Fe trail, and within ten miles of the oldest Catholic mission in the continental United States. This area has been inhabited by Europeans since Jamestown and by natives since they grew thumbs!

post-21188-126258286257_thumb.jpg

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I was wondering what type of Spanish points you were talking about? Or rather from what era/timeline? I have seen many spanish points and they dont look like the one Bob posted.

post-21993-126262483627_thumb.jpg

Now above are sone early Spanish points from the Colonial age. They were conical and the Spanish intended them to be used by their American Indian allies and they were also used with crossbows as late as the 1800's

post-21993-126262504588_thumb.jpg

Now the immediate pic above is an example of Iron arrowheads made by American Indians. My understanding is that these were made by the indians from Iron salvaged from Europeans.

There were indians up around the Great Lakes in late prehistoric times that did make arrowheads out of copper that was native to the land. But thats a different story.

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Guest bedrock bob

And this is the way that I have understood it too, but Ben is a real experienced guy and I want to make sure that I am understanding him correctly. I have a Spanish "point" but it is the end of one of those pikes that they used to spear an indian with for giggles...Not really an arrowhead but a rolled up "spear point" with a hollow blood groove in it to make things nice and gory.

Bob

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Hi Bob,

Yes, I think it's the business end of one of those toad-stickers (lance). I can't tell from the photo so maybe you can tell me, does it look like it was forged by a smithy with a hammer, or with cruder tools by local indians? Each Spanish fort or garrison had a unit blacksmith to repair armor, and make tools and weapons. As Home Depot wasn,t open yet, they ALSO recycled available metal.

Ben

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Those iron arrowheads (great find by the way)were commonly used by ALL tribes after the coming of the whiteman,and were made from barrel bands.How can you figure it was Spanish metal???I have found them in Montana,Idaho,and Nevada

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Those iron arrowheads (great find by the way)were commonly used by ALL tribes after the coming of the whiteman,and were made from barrel bands.How can you figure it was Spanish metal???I have found them in Montana,Idaho,and Nevada

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Hi Kuger,

The one in the photo looks thicker than the iron strapping that was used for barrel banding. I'd really like to see the one in your photo, please try to post it again.

Ben

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Hello Bob,

How the heck are you? Man that is definitely a sweet find! I am sure the area holds more. How does this idea sound? A 1/2 day of fishing the Pecos and the other half detecting for treasure in the surrounding area! The best of both worlds! Here is just a bit of info I have found out about the metal arrowheads of New Mexico:

For those in close contact with the Spanish and succeeding colonial settlements, metal soon replaced stone arrowheads. Much more common in the Southwest after the United States Army introduced ample raw strip metal in barrel hoops and box bands which came along with the military supply wagons. Metal arrowheads became an increasing archaeological record after 1600 or so. Early metal points were made from items such as spoons, knives, wagon wheel hoops and other flat pieces of iron. By the mid 1800S Apache, Comanche, Navajo, Ute and other and other mobile horse-mounted fighters were using chisels and tin snips to cut out arrow points during raids and hunting trips.

Good hunting Bob!

Dean

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