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Finally after four days of getting put on the back burner so the mech could work on bigger

projects(more $$$)my mech started the tear down at 0730....post-300-074014100 1284558326_thumb.jpg

sure was a lot of parts and he wasn't finishpost-300-099054600 1284558344_thumb.jpg

Here's the housing that covers the ball looking thing post-300-065644100 1284558379_thumb.jpg

that's causing the problem...it's normally filled with grease to lub the "globe"that the

whole front wheel hooks topost-300-011193900 1284558405_thumb.jpg

then off to the wash basin(grease pit)meet my mech Nigao(Nig-on)post-300-080349300 1284558422_thumb.jpgin this pit they use a

little diesel to clean the parts and then water to finish the wash job...if this wash pit

was in a auto shop in the USA the state would have 5 environment inspectors and the Feds

would declare it a health hazard and close them down with a hefty fine...

Came back to the house at 0930...will return at 1600 and hope the job is done on both sides..

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I told him last year to just put it in a little slide and gun it through the corners. If you are tail out and kicking up gravel those fully locking rear ends dont pop at all! Once those lockers wear o

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Heybeerman...mailed the lockers back today...takes them about 3 weeks to get there...by

then I'll pull the front diff. and measure the ring gear...the lockers were for a 8" and

they think maybe mine are 9.5"....

BB I think you nailed it on the head about the speed-o cable leaking...but I have to keep

it to check my milage for fuel refills since my fuel guage can't be fixed...no more parts

for that year...

I dont have a fuel gauge either. Go figure. You can get a sending unit and resistor from about any vehicle and make that fuel gauge work. They make cheap universal replacements. I didnt bother. The fuel cell in mine is 14 galons and I carry a 5 gallon reserve can.

"The ball looking thing" is a Birfield joint. The original CV joint.

That knuckle around the birfield should be filled with wheel bearing grease. There is a seal that is supposed to keep the gear oil from migrating from the front diff into the steering knuckle (where the ball looking thing is). If the knuckle has gear oil in it the seal is bad. If you are losing gear oil in the front that is where it is going. It will make a mess on the back of your tire and glob up around the steering knuckle. Make sure that mechanic fills the knuckle about 3/4 full of grease on reinstallation. And the steering pivot bearings must be shimmed properly on reinstallation or you will have a failure on rough roads really quick. Brass shim stock can be cut easily to preload the bearings if the factory shims cant be found.That is where most mechanics fail and after a few thousand miles you will have a huge problem if they are not set right. Those bearings are on top and bottom of that knuckle and are secured by a rectangular cap with four bolts. The knuckle turns on them and they withstand all of the forces of the road. Make sure they are right or you will be walking.

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post-22152-039689900 1284579722_thumb.jp

This is my "new" 1988 Chevy Suburban 4-wheeler. Now, "Goldfinder 1" will climb up or down just about everything - with eight or nine folks on board, but.. at the cost of around 10-miles to the gallon! :*&$*(: - Terry

post-22152-021166300 1284579921_thumb.jp

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BB your right on about the whole mess...my mech is pretty picky and he knows that if any

thing looks a little iffy to replace it...he was inspecting the bearings on the top and

bottom and found the top one on the left side a little shakey so we replaced it...lucked

out with the parts also we had all original parts so the shims and all the other little

pieces were there...thanks for the input....almost donepost-300-077267700 1284599018_thumb.jpg

Terry your going to enjoy that Suburban...wish I had one down here...

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  • 1 month later...

UPDATE: the USPS tracking show that the lockers for the Toyota

cleared Brazilian customs on 29 Oct....that means they'll

probably sit in the state capitol 5 hours from here for a couple

of weeks.....just in time....the rains have started this year in

earnest....

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HALLELUIA....HALLELUIA....HALLELUIA!!!!!

The lockers got here this morning...two of the HALLELUIA'S are for the getting here in the

first place and the third HALLELUIA is because for some reason the Fed. Police at Customs

didn't charge me any duty!!!!

So tomorrow 0700 I'll be at the mech with coffee and cheese bread for him to put me in

the front of the pack of Coca-Cola trucks....

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Garimpo an old trick we used on tractors with no locking diff was when one wheel is spinning apply the brake and that will help slow down the spinning wheel and force the other wheel to turn while keeping your foot on the gas once you do it once or twice youll get the hang of it.

i have a 4wd silverado and the front axle broke and it is now rear wheel drive but i have the transfer case with the low gears which works great.

going up steep gravel dirt roads when i have no load she tends to spin a wheel but if i have a good heavy load on board she is solid on the ground.

i have an automatic locking diff but one wheel has to spin at 150 rpm for the locking diff to lock up.

i have had to replace rear axle pinion bearings about 4 times now, its been a great truck so far just the axles have been a nightmare. i have 170 thousand miles on truck now/ of course axles didnt break until it reached 70 thou miles / warranty ran out after 60 thou miles.

touching wood please god she keeps truckin along for me.

by the way normal driving the front axle grenaded and oil went every where /cromwheel and pinion teeth broke, beer can aluminium axle split in two.

the chevys and fords have aluminium front axles, i might have to look at an older dodge truck that has a full solid front axle, but id love a 4wd van that i could sleep in while prospecting at weekends if i ever find that large chunk of gold that would help buy it lol.

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HALLELUIA....HALLELUIA....HALLELUIA!!!!!

The lockers got here this morning...two of the HALLELUIA'S are for the getting here in the

first place and the third HALLELUIA is because for some reason the Fed. Police at Customs

didn't charge me any duty!!!!

So tomorrow 0700 I'll be at the mech with coffee and cheese bread for him to put me in

the front of the pack of Coca-Cola trucks....

Hi Garimpo

Hows it goin? Did you get appt for your install yet?

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Garimpo an old trick we used on tractors with no locking diff was when one wheel is spinning apply the brake and that will help slow down the spinning wheel and force the other wheel to turn while keeping your foot on the gas once you do it once or twice youll get the hang of it.

i have a 4wd silverado and the front axle broke and it is now rear wheel drive but i have the transfer case with the low gears which works great.

going up steep gravel dirt roads when i have no load she tends to spin a wheel but if i have a good heavy load on board she is solid on the ground.

i have an automatic locking diff but one wheel has to spin at 150 rpm for the locking diff to lock up.

i have had to replace rear axle pinion bearings about 4 times now, its been a great truck so far just the axles have been a nightmare. i have 170 thousand miles on truck now/ of course axles didnt break until it reached 70 thou miles / warranty ran out after 60 thou miles.

touching wood please god she keeps truckin along for me.

by the way normal driving the front axle grenaded and oil went every where /cromwheel and pinion teeth broke, beer can aluminium axle split in two.

the chevys and fords have aluminium front axles, i might have to look at an older dodge truck that has a full solid front axle, but id love a 4wd van that i could sleep in while prospecting at weekends if i ever find that large chunk of gold that would help buy it lol.

That is a great point. Applying the brakes works but when you depress the brake pedal the FRONT brakes engage first. If you are spinning in the front use the foot brake....if you are spinning in the rear use the PARKING brake. It operates the REAR BRAKES ONLY.

On Garimpo's Toyota that technique wont work for the rear brakes. The Toyotas use a drum on the driveshaft and it will just cause heat and friction near the rear transfer seal which will lead to premature leaks. This only works on vehicles where the parking brakes engage the rear shoes or pads.

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Ok folks the drama is over part of the way at least...got the lockers installed

today...at the mech 0700 left 1800...also had to replace some brake parts in three

wheels...the mech did a poor job of bleeding the brakes...going back early tomorrow...

BB your absolutely right about the parking brake on the Toyota and when you forget

to release it about a mile later you can look under the PU and see a very Red

little brake drum....

Now to find a hill closer to the house ;)

post-300-047201600 1289601355_thumb.jpgpost-300-085024100 1289601519_thumb.jpg

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I can't remember all the names of the people on here that was giving me some help

on the assisted traction some time back but everyone seemed to agree on the

LockRite lockers...now after getting to wrong size...sending them back...ordering

larger ones...shipping them here(42 days enroute)...they finally got installed

yesterday...I can hardly wait to try them out...not much to try here in the city...

the gap between the two halves was just barely within limits...put in the 140 weight

gear oil and so far don't hear a thing...no clicking...no jerking ...just plain

good...after installing them while the PU was still on the stands I did turn the

tires and the lockers did click them...

I want to thank the whole bunch of you that were helping with advise...all of you

were right on and all even seemed to be in agreement....

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Finally got out to test the lockers...a ranch here that has had some good gold in the

past is clearing their fence lines with a dozerpost-300-0-47444900-1290117206_thumb.jpg

a lot of fence staples...almost every swing....I was using a Coiltek 19" DD that

covers the ground pretty quick...finally after the dozer got completely out of hearing

I went looking for a hill to test the lockers on...didn't take long to find one..dang

steep...so went up it with just the back lockers...about 30 feet from the top I

started sliding down hill to me left...I already had the front axles engaged so all

I had to do was engage the transfer case...boy did that ever do the trick...then I

looked at the down hill side in front of me and thought no way...no cable and the

dozer had no cablepost-300-0-59743100-1290117541_thumb.jpgthis one is much steeper than

the one I had just came up on...so turned around and started beeping down hill...

here looking up at the Toy..post-300-0-70651500-1290117627_thumb.jpgand then I turned

around and started back down the hillpost-300-0-33232200-1290117674_thumb.jpg

no gold but I've got a lot of fence line to beep and it's in the middle of gold

country....

Sure do like the lockers....now to get over hearing them make their clicking sounds

...sounds like something breaking.....

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  • 4 weeks later...

A big thanks to all you folks that gave me the good advise on

the "assisted traction" devices...yesterday I gave them the

ultimate test...a mile of steep wet gravel hills...ravines

that we had to shovel a little of the banks in to get across...

some of the ridges were sloping to my left so the PU rear end

was trying to follow gravity but the front lockers keep me

going in the right direction...had to steer away from the

skid...since 65% of my driving is on asphalt here in town are

the lockers going to wear out fast?

Here's a guy who I think would fit right in here...

post-300-0-39098500-1292079908_thumb.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...

No, you don't normally drive around with the front end locked in on pavement (at least I hope not), so the locker won't engage.

They need force to engage. If you have the hubs locked in, then it can engage/disengage. If you're driving like this on pavement or other high-traction surfaces, then it is possible to damage components from the tires to the locker.

If you unlock the hubs on the truck, the front end sees no bind and therefore the locker won't engage.

A rear locker will engage/disengage on pavement, and can be damaging under extreme conditions, but you just learn to coast through corners when you can to allow the differential action of an unlocked axle to work for you. Your tires will scrub (slip) before the locker or other hard parts wear or fail in a rear application.

I had one of the older version Detroit lockers in the rear of my Jeep CJ and it would dang near change lanes FOR YOU when it finally unloaded... which almost always seemed to be after a corner on the freeway. otherwise it would scrub the outer rear tire when cornering under power on city streets and then a smaller POP unload once straightened out. it would scare people onto sidewalks every so often as it sounded like a report from a small caliber weapon.

The above is normal even for the "lunchbox" lockers out there, but all lockers are much less harsh to unload these days.

Good pics. I miss green vegetation.

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Thanks Glenn...wish I could talk to you in person...for twenty years I ran posi-tracts

in two different Chevy PU's and never had one problem...now with these lockers they

sure are different than the Posi's....and no I don't lock the front axles in town...

and I'm learning that when going around a corner(90┬░turn) it's better to carry a little

power...just above idle....but like you said when the rear diff. unloads and people are

close by they sure give me a funny look....

Since the monsoon season here is about 4 months long I believe I'll run the lockers in

the rear diff. for that period of time and then switch back to the normal diff. in the

rear...but keep the locker in the front just in case I ever need it since it just sits

there anyway....

I still get a lot of popping and cracking from the diff....don't know if that's normal

or not...and I don't horse the truck around at all...I drive just like an old man....

Are these LockRite lockers considered "limited slip"?

Thanks for the info....

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Lockrites are a positive, automatic locking differential. Not a Limited Slip. They are open until slippage is detected, then the axles are locked together and spin both wheels the same speed. An LSD (limited slip diff, aka posi in old Chevy terms) senses slippage and biases power to the wheel with traction via clutches or, in the case of a few like the TrueTrac, helical-cut gears.

The LockRite is known as the lucnhbox locker because it replaces only the side and spider gears in the diff case and can be put in by a competent person on their lunch break (or so they say). A Detroit or other full case locker replaces the differential case entirely and requires gear setup because you either reuse or replace the ring and pinion gears in the install. The primary differences in these two are degree of difficulty for setup, price and strength (the full case lockers being stronger) it used to be that the full case units were much more harsh to unload thank the lock rite-style.

for your use I anticipate the Lockrite is a great choice and should last a long time.

There's no reason to pull it out during the dry season. You've already found the sweet spot for cornering and allowing the diff to run like it should.

the "cracking" and significance of noise you're describing is not to be discounted. If you could get a recording and send via email orwe can arrange an FTP upload id be happy to listen and provide professional opinion. Also, if you want to explain the circumstances when you hear the noises, in detail, and try to relate them in terms of volume/what you feel in the truck, we can help (Bedrock Bob appears quite knowledgeable, too, and I invite his opinion as well)

Maybe we can talk sometime. We could set up to Skype or something, although I've never used it before. :)

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Lockrites are a positive, automatic locking differential. Not a Limited Slip. They are open until slippage is detected, then the axles are locked together and spin both wheels the same speed. An LSD (limited slip diff, aka posi in old Chevy terms) senses slippage and biases power to the wheel with traction via clutches or, in the case of a few like the TrueTrac, helical-cut gears.

The LockRite is known as the lucnhbox locker because it replaces only the side and spider gears in the diff case and can be put in by a competent person on their lunch break (or so they say). A Detroit or other full case locker replaces the differential case entirely and requires gear setup because you either reuse or replace the ring and pinion gears in the install. The primary differences in these two are degree of difficulty for setup, price and strength (the full case lockers being stronger) it used to be that the full case units were much more harsh to unload thank the lock rite-style.

for your use I anticipate the Lockrite is a great choice and should last a long time.

There's no reason to pull it out during the dry season. You've already found the sweet spot for cornering and allowing the diff to run like it should.

the "cracking" and significance of noise you're describing is not to be discounted. If you could get a recording and send via email orwe can arrange an FTP upload id be happy to listen and provide professional opinion. Also, if you want to explain the circumstances when you hear the noises, in detail, and try to relate them in terms of volume/what you feel in the truck, we can help (Bedrock Bob appears quite knowledgeable, too, and I invite his opinion as well)

Maybe we can talk sometime. We could set up to Skype or something, although I've never used it before. :)

Thanks Glenn for the reply...I'll start paying more attention to when and what happens in the future and give you a better description of what's going on...

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Don,

I dont know what kind of noises you have going on under there but lockers are noisy. And with the size of the gears in the Cruiser I can imagine that they really carry on. You should be able to make really "lazy" corners on pavement without much banging around. I dont use lockers for that very reason. Not to say they arent great for off roading, they are just a PIA in town. Especially with a stiff, boxy little tractor like a Land Cruiser. What you gain off road you lose on the asphalt and despite the mud it is a tough trade.

The Toyota stuff in the gearbox is good. Beefy stuff and great materials and workmanship. If things are set up right you shouldn't have any problems with Lock Rites wearing anything out except your rear tires.

If you hit the corners fast and go into a little slide when you go around 'em those lockers wont unload like that. :yuk-yuk:

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Don,

I dont know what kind of noises you have going on under there but lockers are noisy. And with the size of the gears in the Cruiser I can imagine that they really carry on. You should be able to make really "lazy" corners on pavement without much banging around. I dont use lockers for that very reason. Not to say they arent great for off roading, they are just a PIA in town. Especially with a stiff, boxy little tractor like a Land Cruiser. What you gain off road you lose on the asphalt and despite the mud it is a tough trade.

The Toyota stuff in the gearbox is good. Beefy stuff and great materials and workmanship. If things are set up right you shouldn't have any problems with Lock Rites wearing anything out except your rear tires.

If you hit the corners fast and go into a little slide when you go around 'em those lockers wont unload like that. :yuk-yuk:

Your right about everything BB...only Toyota owners know about the "tractor" type ride...

as for going around corners in a slide the lockers wouldn't be much worry but the

"unload" in my shorts would be...thanks for the info...

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Have a question for you folks that know about the floating axles on my Toyota...now and

then I have to tighten the six little bolts that holds the axle in and occasionally

one or two of them will sheer off...since I put the lockers in I've really been keeping

my eye on them...in the month or so the lockers have been installed no problems..until

today....when I check them yesterday(right rear) all was good...today four of the six

are sheered off...went to the bakery and when I got back I had only one bolt remaining...

headed for the mech tomorrow AM...anybody have any idea why the problem? It's mostly the

right rear...the mech has even double nutted the bolts...some still come out and some

sheer....

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Have a question for you folks that know about the floating axles on my Toyota...now and

then I have to tighten the six little bolts that holds the axle in and occasionally

one or two of them will sheer off...since I put the lockers in I've really been keeping

my eye on them...in the month or so the lockers have been installed no problems..until

today....when I check them yesterday(right rear) all was good...today four of the six

are sheered off...went to the bakery and when I got back I had only one bolt remaining...

headed for the mech tomorrow AM...anybody have any idea why the problem? It's mostly the

right rear...the mech has even double nutted the bolts...some still come out and some

sheer....

There are two styles of differential, so I am not sure whether it is a "semi floating" or "fully floating" axle. I believe all the units I have are "semi floating" and are 67-78 vintage. I dont have my book handy or I could tell you exactly what the deal is.

Here is how my axles come out...

The axles are held in by two clips in the differential housing. You remove the bolt, take out the spacer, push the axles in a tad and pull off the clip. The axle slides out through the housing and the outer bearing. I am not sure which six little bolts you are talking about. :shrug:

Are they inside the differential or out at the brake drum and backing plate?

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Just a WAG here, but I would be the Mech did not use a torque wrench and just cranked them down hard. Over torque on a bolt will certainly make it prone to shearing.

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BB my axles don't have clips...like this AM the mech just takes the six little bolts

out of the hub(except today there was only one left)and then just pull the entire axle

out...then we cleaned out the bolts that were broken off(the welder did that)and replaced

them with new ones....

El. D....there is not such thing in this entire town(torque wrench)..when they rebuilt

my motor about four years ago I was watching and waiting for the guy to bring out his

torque wrench and it never happened...but you might be on to something about the bolts

being over "hand torqued"....

These bolts are #6...kinda small so today I went back with #6/8....these are the bolts

that hold the axle in...the other day I saw another Toyota that had a strap welded

across the front and the sides to hold his axle in....maybe what I'll have to do...

Thanks for the comments folks...

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Subject: WHY THE BETTER PAY ?

The Cardiologist and the Motorcycle Mechanic

A motorcycle mechanic was removing a cylinder-head from the motor of a Harley-Davidson, when he spotted a well-known cardiologist in his shop.

The cardiologist was there, waiting for the service manager to come and take a look at his bike. The mechanic shouted across the garage, 'Hey Doc, want to take a look at this?' The cardiologist, a bit surprised, walked over to where the mechanic was working on the motorcycle.

The mechanic straightened up, wiped his hands on a rag and asked, 'So, Doc, look at this engine. I open its heart, take the valves out, repair any damage, and then put them back in, and when I'm finished, it works just like new.

So how come I make $39,675 a year and you make $1,695,000, when you and I are doing basically the same work?'

The cardiologist paused, leaned over, and whispered to the mechanic....

"Try doing it with the engine running".

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  • 2 weeks later...

You need to get a good quality torque wrench and stand right there when your mech. does his thing and make sure every bolt is "torqued" to specs or your never gonna get away from those broken bolts.It's really easy to stretch a bolt past it's maximum torque point and most people have no clue they do it, hell half the time the bolts are broke before you drive it away. Use a little LOCKTITE on the threads and the proper torque and you should be good to go--and i hope your using the correct hardness of bolt that YOTA calls for because that will make a huge difference also. Oh yeah only torque them once don't go back and check them 2 or 3 times you'll over strech the bolts or start pulling threads.

good luck

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