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Lead worth something?


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I read this post on a catfish1.com forum post. I thought I'd share it. Detectorists especially are always saying they wish lead was worth something. Well maybe one day it will be.

""A buddy at work asked me how lead is formed, mined, whatever. I decided to goto good 'ole Wiki to read about it for a bit. I found some pretty good information:

Production and recycling

Production and consumption of lead is increasing worldwide. Total annual production is about 8 million tonnes; about half is produced from recycled scrap. Top lead producing countries, as of 2008, are Australia, China, USA, Peru, Canada, Mexico, Sweden, Morocco, South Africa and North Korea.[4] Australia, China and the United States account for more than half of primary production.[6]

2008 mine production: 3,886,000 tones

2008 metal production: 8,725,000 tones

2008 metal consumption: 8,706,000 tones[7]

At current use rates, the supply of lead is estimated to run out in 42 years.[8] Environmental analyst, Lester Brown, however, has suggested lead could run out within 18 years based on an extrapolation of 2% growth per year.[9] This may need to be reviewed to take account of renewed interest in recycling, and rapid progress in fuel cell technology.""

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I read this post on a catfish1.com forum post. I thought I'd share it. Detectorists especially are always saying they wish lead was worth something. Well maybe one day it will be.

""A buddy at work asked me how lead is formed, mined, whatever. I decided to goto good 'ole Wiki to read about it for a bit. I found some pretty good information:

Production and recycling

Production and consumption of lead is increasing worldwide. Total annual production is about 8 million tonnes; about half is produced from recycled scrap. Top lead producing countries, as of 2008, are Australia, China, USA, Peru, Canada, Mexico, Sweden, Morocco, South Africa and North Korea.[4] Australia, China and the United States account for more than half of primary production.[6]

2008 mine production: 3,886,000 tones

2008 metal production: 8,725,000 tones

2008 metal consumption: 8,706,000 tones[7]

At current use rates, the supply of lead is estimated to run out in 42 years.[8] Environmental analyst, Lester Brown, however, has suggested lead could run out within 18 years based on an extrapolation of 2% growth per year.[9] This may need to be reviewed to take account of renewed

interest in recycling, and rapid progress in fuel cell technology.""

Guess I'll keep holding on to all the lead I find.

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I have a white bucket full of tire weights and no one will take it.

I have a block 30lbs of 60 Lead, 40 Tin soldier and no one will take it.

They think it's the Toxin From Hell.

While in Florida, I found 3 or 5 Lb of fishing weights some days.

I sold them on the beach to fishermen 10 cents a once. At the stores it was 60.

Sorta hard to sell it here in the Desert.

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I'd like it. Most of us fisherman make our own weights.

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LOL! Come Get It! :coffeetime:

I remember as a kid I could scroung old dead car batteries and make 4 or 5 $ each out of them.

Hell You have to pay people to take them away here.

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I read this post on a catfish1.com forum post. I thought I'd share it. Detectorists especially are always saying they wish lead was worth something. Well maybe one day it will be.

""A buddy at work asked me how lead is formed, mined, whatever. I decided to goto good 'ole Wiki to read about it for a bit. I found some pretty good information:

Production and recycling

Production and consumption of lead is increasing worldwide. Total annual production is about 8 million tonnes; about half is produced from recycled scrap. Top lead producing countries, as of 2008, are Australia, China, USA, Peru, Canada, Mexico, Sweden, Morocco, South Africa and North Korea.[4] Australia, China and the United States account for more than half of primary production.[6]

2008 mine production: 3,886,000 tones

2008 metal production: 8,725,000 tones

2008 metal consumption: 8,706,000 tones[7]

At current use rates, the supply of lead is estimated to run out in 42 years.[8] Environmental analyst, Lester Brown, however, has suggested lead could run out within 18 years based on an extrapolation of 2% growth per year.[9] This may need to be reviewed to take account of renewed interest in recycling, and rapid progress in fuel cell technology.""

I always take these reports with a grain of salt. I remember reading an old report from 1919 that predicted we would run out of oil in 30 years. Same with all the other commodities. They are continuously finding new oil fields, ore-bodies,etc.

Steve

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I have a white bucket full of tire weights and no one will take it.

I have a block 30lbs of 60 Lead, 40 Tin soldier and no one will take it.

They think it's the Toxin From Hell.

While in Florida, I found 3 or 5 Lb of fishing weights some days.

I sold them on the beach to fishermen 10 cents a once. At the stores it was 60.

Sorta hard to sell it here in the Desert.

You might try the forum at Woodenboat.com, as the builders consume a lot of recycled tire weights,etc. for casting and pouring keels. My keel is cast iron, but many new builders still prefer lead. Just a thought, but there are even wooden boat builders in NM.

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