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Boy Hit By Meteorite


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Meteor hits boy on way to school

A pebble-sized meteorite crashed and burned into Earth, grazing 14-year-old Gerritt Blank while on his way to catch the school bus. “At first, I only saw a big, white ball of light. Then, my hand hurt, and then it slammed into the street,” he told daily Westdeutsche Allgemeine Zeitung. “After I saw the white light, I felt something on my hand.”

The result was a 10-centimetre burn on the back of his left hand, but Blank knew something special had happened to him.

“I thought the meteor struck me, but it could also be a result from the heat as it went by me,” he said.

After the intial shock, Blank looked at the glowing rock the left a sizable crater in Brakeler Wald Street. He then took the iced tea from his school lunch and doused his glowing pebble and took it to school with him.

“At school, I told the story. My classmates believed me,” he said. His parents didn’t get to hear the story until the end of the school day.

Once home, Blank, who plans to focus his studies in science, tested the round, black object and already found some confirmation the pebble is from outer space: like many meteorites, the rock is magnetic.

Approximately 3,000 meteorites hit the Earth’s surface daily.

Comment from poster:

This kid said it burned him. I've read meteorites are usually cool or just warm when people have touched them right after they've landed. I wonder if this kid is full of imagination or if his meteorite was actually that hot?

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Hi Mark, can you tell me where your source for this story was and maybe provide some links? I did an internet search and found nothing.

PS- there is a meteorite section on this forum perhaps next time you might try posting it in there.

Del

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OK here is why I don't believe this story:

1. A meteorite that small would not survive the sudden slow down and ablation in the upper atmosphere.

2. Even if it did survive ablation and the sudden slowing from cosmic velosity to free fall. It would not create a small "crater".

3. If there was a so called white light that is also proof that it is too small to survive.

4. Most meteorites blow up in the upper atmosphere where the white light trail starts. This is usually above 100,000 feet. The free fall from this altitude would take 5 to 10 minutes or longer. It would be possible if it were a large meteorite for the light to occur and a small piece to fall to earth, but it would take a while for it to fall to the surface. Small crater? not possible unless it landed in some very light, loose and deep dirt. Be like dropping an iron bearing from 90 feet.

5. Rich, Not sure if the link you posted is from a legitimate news source or not. I remain unconvinced.Huh_anim].gif

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OK here is why I don't believe this story:

1. A meteorite that small would not survive the sudden slow down and ablation in the upper atmosphere.

2. Even if it did survive ablation and the sudden slowing from cosmic velosity to free fall. It would not create a small "crater".

3. If there was a so called white light that is also proof that it is too small to survive.

4. Most meteorites blow up in the upper atmosphere where the white light trail starts. This is usually above 100,000 feet. The free fall from this altitude would take 5 to 10 minutes or longer. It would be possible if it were a large meteorite for the light to occur and a small piece to fall to earth, but it would take a while for it to fall to the surface. Small crater? not possible unless it landed in some very light, loose and deep dirt. Be like dropping an iron bearing from 90 feet.

5. Rich, Not sure if the link you posted is from a legitimate news source or not. I remain unconvinced.Huh_anim].gif

And no way would it still be even warm let alone burn anything.

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5. Rich, Not sure if the link you posted is from a legitimate news source or not. I remain unconvinced

Earl I agree with you, Del asked for a link a 5 second search that that is what I found. I guess stranger things have

happened but this is pushing it. :twocents:

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After the intial shock, Blank looked at the glowing rock the left a sizable crater in Brakeler Wald Street. He then took the iced tea from his school lunch and doused his glowing pebble and took it to school with him.

This sounds like :bs: :bs: :bs: to me. Glowing pebble and sizable crater? Did anyone see the size of the pebble? :bs:

Steve

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Sounds like a German was whipping up some Bratwurst for breakfast, you know those Germans love their brats. Well one fell in the BBQ and in his haste to retrieve it inadvertently flicked a hot coal over the fence hitting the child and it then landed in a pot hole.....................Case Closed...............See what happens when a child stays up late to watch Meteorite Men :innocent0009:

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Earl,

I agree with most of what you said...

OK here is why I don't believe this story:

1. A meteorite that small would not survive the sudden slow down and ablation in the upper atmosphere.

RESPONSE: If it were that small upon initial atmospheric entry then you are correct. However being ablated to that size during entry is entirely possible.

]2. Even if it did survive ablation and the sudden slowing from cosmic velosity to free fall. It would not create a small "crater".

CORRECT Of course! A stone of that size would reach terminal velocity and certainly not create a crater (impact pit) in the ground, much less in a hard asphalt road!.

3. If there was a so called white light that is also proof that it is too small to survive.

RESPONSE: Not necessarily... You are assuming the light that was supposedly seen was coming from the small meteoroid during flight. If there was a light produced, it may have been produced by the main mass during terminal burst or before that during entry incandescence. The stone he has "could be" only a small piece of a larger fall. I doubt it, but it is possible.

4. Most meteorites blow up in the upper atmosphere where the white light trail starts. This is usually above 100,000 feet. The free fall from this altitude would take 5 to 10 minutes or longer. It would be possible if it were a large meteorite for the light to occur and a small piece to fall to earth, but it would take a while for it to fall to the surface. Small crater? not possible unless it landed in some very light, loose and deep dirt. Be like dropping an iron bearing from 90 feet.

RESPONSE: I agree with most of what you said... However...

"...Most meteorites blow up in the upper atmosphere where the white light trail starts..."

RESPONSE: It's still a meteoroid when falling through the atmosphere. They usually burn up, not blow up, and you're right it happens HIGH in the atmosphere. The meteoroids that "blow up" or reach a terminal burst point are usually much lower in the atmosphere. The Sikhote Alin iron meteorite is a perfect example. If I remember correctly it exploded/fragmented around 3 miles high or approximately 15840 ft. Of course this was a very large fall so comparison to this supposed fall may be a bit unfair.

More recently we have solid data that shows the terminal burst point of a very recent and famous meteorite fall was less than 20K ft.

"...This is usually above 100,000 feet..."

RESPONSE: If you mean meteoroid then yes, small pieces do burn up high in the atmosphere.

"...The free fall from this altitude would take 5 to 10 minutes or longer..."

RESPONSE: A free fall at that altitude while falling at terminal velocity would take 5-10 minutes, probably. Falling at cosmic velocity no. Cosmic velocity is typically around 11km/sec to 26km/sec on average. Sometimes faster.. The meteoroid slows until it reaches terminal velocity and only then free falls to the ground. To free fall from 100,000 ft would take quite a while. What's the typical altitude at which meteoroids break up and/or slow to terminal velocity? It varies from event to event...

5. "...I remain unconvinced.

I agree 100%... I remain unconvinced, verification is needed.

Regards,

Eric

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Earl,

I agree with most of what you said...

OK here is why I don't believe this story:

1. A meteorite that small would not survive the sudden slow down and ablation in the upper atmosphere.

RESPONSE: If it were that small upon initial atmospheric entry then you are correct. However being ablated to that size during entry is entirely possible.

]2. Even if it did survive ablation and the sudden slowing from cosmic velosity to free fall. It would not create a small "crater".

CORRECT Of course! A stone of that size would reach terminal velocity and certainly not create a crater (impact pit) in the ground, much less in a hard asphalt road!.

3. If there was a so called white light that is also proof that it is too small to survive.

RESPONSE: Not necessarily... You are assuming the light that was supposedly seen was coming from the small meteoroid during flight. If there was a light produced, it may have been produced by the main mass during terminal burst or before that during entry incandescence. The stone he has "could be" only a small piece of a larger fall. I doubt it, but it is possible.

4. Most meteorites blow up in the upper atmosphere where the white light trail starts. This is usually above 100,000 feet. The free fall from this altitude would take 5 to 10 minutes or longer. It would be possible if it were a large meteorite for the light to occur and a small piece to fall to earth, but it would take a while for it to fall to the surface. Small crater? not possible unless it landed in some very light, loose and deep dirt. Be like dropping an iron bearing from 90 feet.

RESPONSE: I agree with most of what you said... However...

"...Most meteorites blow up in the upper atmosphere where the white light trail starts..."

RESPONSE: It's still a meteoroid when falling through the atmosphere. They usually burn up, not blow up, and you're right it happens HIGH in the atmosphere. The meteoroids that "blow up" or reach a terminal burst point are usually much lower in the atmosphere. The Sikhote Alin iron meteorite is a perfect example. If I remember correctly it exploded/fragmented around 3 miles high or approximately 15840 ft. Of course this was a very large fall so comparison to this supposed fall may be a bit unfair.

More recently we have solid data that shows the terminal burst point of a very recent and famous meteorite fall was less than 20K ft.

"...This is usually above 100,000 feet..."

RESPONSE: If you mean meteoroid then yes, small pieces do burn up high in the atmosphere.

"...The free fall from this altitude would take 5 to 10 minutes or longer..."

RESPONSE: A free fall at that altitude while falling at terminal velocity would take 5-10 minutes, probably. Falling at cosmic velocity no. Cosmic velocity is typically around 11km/sec to 26km/sec on average. Sometimes faster.. The meteoroid slows until it reaches terminal velocity and only then free falls to the ground. To free fall from 100,000 ft would take quite a while. What's the typical altitude at which meteoroids break up and/or slow to terminal velocity? It varies from event to event...

5. "...I remain unconvinced.

I agree 100%... I remain unconvinced, verification is needed.

Regards,

Eric

I see this story also made it to FOX news. There must be some other explanation. This duck don't seem to be walking or quacking right. :arrowheadsmiley:

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I see this story also made it to FOX news. There must be some other explanation. This duck don't seem to be walking or quacking right. :arrowheadsmiley:

Yup! I've received many emails on this. There is not explanation yet but a reporter in Norway contacted me not long ago and said he has interviewed the scientist. The journalist said the scientist reports that he was misquoted when referring to the verification of the stone being a meteorite. The reporter also said he was going to investigate further tomorrow.

I'm very suspicious of this report, as are many others. Not only has FoxNews picked it up, but Discovery Magazine reported the same thing but in a debunking sort of way. http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastro...by-a-meteorite/

Wired Science also reports: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/06/...by-a-meteorite/

As does MSNBC: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/31322855/ns/te..._science-space/

The Sun UK: http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/...ite-strike.html

And many more large papers... Haven't seen it on CNN yet...

Yahoo News of course has it: http://news.yahoo.com/s/space/20090612/sc_...Sidnbq5bKADW7oF

Space.com: http://www.space.com/news/090612-boy-hit-by-meteorite.html

The world is running with this, and it's too late to take it back if this turns out to be a hoax.

I'm hopeful but extremely skeptical on this one.

Regards,

Eric

P.S. Perhaps Bill or another moderator should move this post to the Meteorite Forum... ;) Yes?

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Yeah, If this is a hoax I'm not sure the boy realized how big a deal it is for a meteorite to impact a human. If it's not a hoax and it really is a meteorite, then this may be the newest known fall.

I'm not really investigating this like I normally do with supposed falls because it's not in the USA, but I'm curious as to what the scientist has to say. Obviously there's too much that does not add up. I'm thinking that by Monday, if this is a hoax, the boy will cave under the worldwide press and come clean with the truth.

If this is a real fall, this ain't going away anytime soon, and there will be many scientists and meteorite hunters flocking to this area.

Someone need to check local news reports around that time to see if there were other reports of a fireball, sonic booms or big bangs, smoke in the air etc...

The "burn" on the kids hand looks eerily like a cigarette burn, and the streak below the main circular burn area could have happened if the boy jerked his hand away from the hot cigarette. Look at the photo. The kid could have been playing with friend's and doing a sissy test. We all know what sissy tests are right. If not, I'll elaborate. Usually a sissy test is any pain inflicting action done by one person on another. In the cigarette test two kids would stand side by side and hold the lit cigarette between their arms. Another version is to hold a lit cigarette on the back of the hand or another sensitive area. If the person removes his hand from the heat, he's considered a sissy. Yeah I know... Barbaric right? ;) Come'on you know you've done it!

Here's a look at the scar. You judge for yourself...

_45916040_cen_meteoriteboy_03.jpg

Anyway, the burn on this kids hand looks eerily like a sissy test burn... Maybe the kid came up with the meteorite story to cover his ass so he wouldn't get in trouble at home. Who knows...

It's all suspicious...

Regards,

Eric

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This kid has convinced a lot of people. I wouldn't be surprised if he gets an admission offered for Harvard Law School. Anyone that can bullcrap and convince the mainstream media like that, surely has a future in practicing law. :smrt1:

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Hey Earl,

It doesn't take very much to bull s__t the news media these days. They will believe and say (write)anything inorder to get attention. Just look what Obama is doing.

Keep on a Hunting,

Bob

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