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Unusual find (not gold)


Boorx4

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Greetings everyone,

I was hunting in New Mexico a few weeks ago, very close to the old Santa Fe trail. Digging tons of trash when the magnet on my digging pick found this:

post-951-1244083899_thumb.jpg

An honest to goodness "Iron" arrowhead. Rusted pretty good but the real McCoy.

Googling iron arrowheads, I found out that the Native Americans (formally, "Indians"), as we all know, used flint or some other typed of quartz / silicate material to produce their hunting, fighting points. However, a few tribed in upper Michigan did use native copper for some of their points.

Once the Europeans came with all their iron objects, Native Americans began to scavenge pieces of discarded iron and found uses for this new material. One being, making arrow and spear heads. I can't help wondering if the iron used for this arrowhead came from the eastern pioneers or the first Europeans--the conquistadors? Interesting thought!

Moral of this story is: just because your detector or your ears are saying "Iron" doesn't mean that it is junk.

Keep on beeping,

Bob

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Great find! Indians used to take metal parts from their rifles to make arrowheads and to lighten their guns. Congratulations!

Greetings everyone,

I was hunting in New Mexico a few weeks ago, very close to the old Santa Fe trail. Digging tons of trash when the magnet on my digging pick found this:

post-951-1244083899_thumb.jpg

An honest to goodness "Iron" arrowhead. Rusted pretty good but the real McCoy.

Googling iron arrowheads, I found out that the Native Americans (formally, "Indians"), as we all know, used flint or some other typed of quartz / silicate material to produce their hunting, fighting points. However, a few tribed in upper Michigan did use native copper for some of their points.

Once the Europeans came with all their iron objects, Native Americans began to scavenge pieces of discarded iron and found uses for this new material. One being, making arrow and spear heads. I can't help wondering if the iron used for this arrowhead came from the eastern pioneers or the first Europeans--the conquistadors? Interesting thought!

Moral of this story is: just because your detector or your ears are saying "Iron" doesn't mean that it is junk.

Keep on beeping,

Bob

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FYI, this type of find is really cool but also not something you want to get out into certain circles. You have found an antiquity which a few years ago was waaay cool and then they changed the law to make that not so cool. Be careful who you show.

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Guest bedrock bob
Greetings everyone,

I was hunting in New Mexico a few weeks ago, very close to the old Santa Fe trail. Digging tons of trash when the magnet on my digging pick found this:

post-951-1244083899_thumb.jpg

An honest to goodness "Iron" arrowhead. Rusted pretty good but the real McCoy.

Googling iron arrowheads, I found out that the Native Americans (formally, "Indians"), as we all know, used flint or some other typed of quartz / silicate material to produce their hunting, fighting points. However, a few tribed in upper Michigan did use native copper for some of their points.

Once the Europeans came with all their iron objects, Native Americans began to scavenge pieces of discarded iron and found uses for this new material. One being, making arrow and spear heads. I can't help wondering if the iron used for this arrowhead came from the eastern pioneers or the first Europeans--the conquistadors? Interesting thought!

Moral of this story is: just because your detector or your ears are saying "Iron" doesn't mean that it is junk.

Keep on beeping,

Bob

That is a very cool find. I have been swinging a detector for a long time and I have never found one. I was told that they used the Spanish armor to make points that would penetrate Spanish armor.

Bob

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Guest bedrock bob

Lotsa Luck is right, Bob. I really dont think a metal point would be that big a deal, but there are a few zealots out there. It is a nice bragging piece though.

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Greetings all,

I just didn't think to mention that this arrowhead was found on PRIVATE LAND. Just covering all bases. :tisc-tisc:

Bob

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Bob,

The fact that you found it on private land makes all the difference. Excellent find!!!

Thanks for posting this great example of why a guy needs to dig all targets. I'm a newbie, only had a detector in my hands a few times, and already I have a tendency to want to move on because "it's an iron signal". Thanks for the lesson!

Dean

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I know that Ruben aka. Mr-Meteorite finds iron arrowheads in New Mexico when he is hunting the GLORIETA Stewnfield. By the way very nice find!

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Guest bedrock bob

You know, I have been told that the antiquities act does not differentiate between private and public land. I dont really know, but my understanding is that it does not matter if they decide your find is of cultural importance. I have been told that any native american artifact falls under this classification and anything else that is over 50 years old.

Again, this may be wrong, but it is how I understand it.

Bob

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