Jump to content
Nugget Shooter Forums

Hunting on Arizona State Land?


Recommended Posts

I just bought a Whites GMT, and I'm anxious to go out and put it to use. I sent in my application to join a local prospecting club; they have several claims near where I live. I'd like to know if gold prospecting is permitted on State of Arizona land and also federal land. Are special permits required? I would appreciate any information on this subject. Thank you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just bought a Whites GMT, and I'm anxious to go out and put it to use. I sent in my application to join a local prospecting club; they have several claims near where I live. I'd like to know if gold prospecting is permitted on State of Arizona land and also federal land. Are special permits required? I would appreciate any information on this subject. Thank you.

Interesting name "Arch Stanton". That was the name that the unknown grave was next to, with the stolen payroll in it. And thats the Good, Bad and the Ugly of it.

Sorry, I am a movie buff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's too bad. I don't know why the state doesn't let you look for gold using a metal detector. That's right Blondie. Found any gold in the "crack of America?" Thanks for the replies.

Interesting name "Arch Stanton". That was the name that the unknown grave was next to, with the stolen payroll in it. And thats the Good, Bad and the Ugly of it.

Sorry, I am a movie buff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Arch and All

I had a chance meeting with several Arizona State agencies about a

week ago. I got the 50 cent tour of one of their helicopters,and a chat

with several officers.

I can tell you that the tax payers of Arizona have paid for the latest and

greatest high tech equipment. Due to the price of gold,and all the prospecting

interest,they are watching State land close.

The Fish and Game,State Foresters,Wildland Fire ,Highway Patrol,BLM, Forest

Service, Sheriffs Offices,all have helicopters,and fixed wing aircraft flying with

the same equipment. Plus they have people on the ground,including ranchers,

and do gooders just waiting to turn a guy in.

If caught they will seize your equipment,and vehicle,plus arrest you and book

you into jail. The computers,cameras,and other equipment on board those planes,

and helicopters can pin point your location,and determine land ownership in seconds.

Yeah they have GPS and overlays too,plus instant communication,if they need more

information. Plus just about everyone out in the sticks has a cell phone,and lots of

them love to turn people in.

So anyone that thinks they are alone and no one is watching,no matter where you

are at,think again! I just happened to be in the area where these guys were conducting

a field training exercise. My claims are in a flight path and I get buzzed several times

a day,by a Highway Patrol helicopter,and several others.

Arch as far as for open public land,your best bet is to go to the local BLM,office and

ask. Plus research the geocommunicator,and lr2000 until you think you are going to

go blind. Not all public land including BLM is open for prospecting. Some areas are

withdrawn or closed for other reasons. Also there is about a zillion active claims too.

The best advice for any new prospector is to join a club,or join up with a legitimate

prospector that is willing to show you the ropes. It will help you find gold faster,stay

out of jail,and maybe not get shot,by some lunatic. :laught16:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the lowdown. I wish that they would be this zealous about finding drug and people traffickers. I don't see what's the big deal looking for gold with a metal detector. I'm in the process of joining a club, but this kind of seems more trouble than its worth. What about looking for coins with a metal detector on state land? Is that against the law too? What about federal forest land? Thanks again.

Arch and All

I had a chance meeting with several Arizona State agencies about a

week ago. I got the 50 cent tour of one of their helicopters,and a chat

with several officers.

I can tell you that the tax payers of Arizona have paid for the latest and

greatest high tech equipment. Due to the price of gold,and all the prospecting

interest,they are watching State land close.

The Fish and Game,State Foresters,Wildland Fire ,Highway Patrol,BLM, Forest

Service, Sheriffs Offices,all have helicopters,and fixed wing aircraft flying with

the same equipment. Plus they have people on the ground,including ranchers,

and do gooders just waiting to turn a guy in.

If caught they will seize your equipment,and vehicle,plus arrest you and book

you into jail. The computers,cameras,and other equipment on board those planes,

and helicopters can pin point your location,and determine land ownership in seconds.

Yeah they have GPS and overlays too,plus instant communication,if they need more

information. Plus just about everyone out in the sticks has a cell phone,and lots of

them love to turn people in.

So anyone that thinks they are alone and no one is watching,no matter where you

are at,think again! I just happened to be in the area where these guys were conducting

a field training exercise. My claims are in a flight path and I get buzzed several times

a day,by a Highway Patrol helicopter,and several others.

Arch as far as for open public land,your best bet is to go to the local BLM,office and

ask. Plus research the geocommunicator,and lr2000 until you think you are going to

go blind. Not all public land including BLM is open for prospecting. Some areas are

withdrawn or closed for other reasons. Also there is about a zillion active claims too.

The best advice for any new prospector is to join a club,or join up with a legitimate

prospector that is willing to show you the ropes. It will help you find gold faster,stay

out of jail,and maybe not get shot,by some lunatic. :laught16:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Fish and Game,State Foresters,Wildland Fire ,Highway Patrol,BLM, Forest

Service, Sheriffs Offices,all have helicopters,and fixed wing aircraft flying with

the same equipment. Plus they have people on the ground,including ranchers,

and do gooders just waiting to turn a guy in.

If caught they will seize your equipment,and vehicle,plus arrest you and book

you into jail. The computers,cameras,and other equipment on board those planes,

and helicopters can pin point your location,and determine land ownership in seconds.

Yeah they have GPS and overlays too,plus instant communication,if they need more

information. Plus just about everyone out in the sticks has a cell phone,and lots of

them love to turn people in.

So anyone that thinks they are alone and no one is watching,no matter where you

are at,think again! I just happened to be in the area where these guys were conducting

a field training exercise. My claims are in a flight path and I get buzzed several times

a day,by a Highway Patrol helicopter,and several others.

Arch,

Don't fall into Sawmills paranoid, self centered view of Big Brother. Yes, you can have permits and claims on State Land.

Sawmill,

Your yarn reminded me of a guy I knew once that admitted he was so paranoid and self centered that while watching a football game, when the team formed a huddle, he thought they were talking about him. :laught16: "Lighten up Francis"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was thinking that it was rather odd that you weren't allowed to metal detect for gold on state land. Thank you for the information. Have a good day.

Arch,

Don't fall into Sawmills paranoid, self centered view of Big Brother. Yes, you can have permits and claims on State Land.

Sawmill,

Your yarn reminded me of a guy I knew once that admitted he was so paranoid and self centered that while watching a football game, when the team formed a huddle, he thought they were talking about him. :laught16: "Lighten up Francis"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Earl is trying to feed you a line of crap! Recreational mining or metal detecting on state trust land is prohibited. State trust land is not public land period. Simply being on the land without the proper permit is trespassing,and no permit allows for metal detecting.

http://www.tucsonhunting.com/State_Land.php

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Earl is trying to feed you a line of crap! Recreational mining or metal detecting on state trust land is prohibited. State trust land is not public land period. Simply being on the land without the proper permit is trespassing,and no permit allows for metal detecting.

Big Jeff and Arch,

Here is a web site that you can educate yourselves regarding this topic.

http://www.land.state.az.us/programs/natur...ral_leasing.htm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He did not ask about starting a strip mine operation or drilling for oil. and if you actually read the page you linked to educate me you would see that it clearly states that "recreational mining or mineral collecting on state trust land is prohibited!"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There seems to be some confusion on what is allowed on state trust land (how they got the land is another debate)

State land is open for prospecting contrary to sawmills belief. And big jeff is only talking about recreational use.

Mineral Exploration application. Which is totally different from recreational activities, Starting at $3500 (less rent)you can get a section to play with. Nothing in the regs that say you cant use a metal detector for Mineral Exploration.

Just pay the fee and dot the I's

Arizona State Land Department

EXPLORATION PERMIT APPLICATION

1. A non-refundable filing fee of $500.00 is required for each application.

2. An environmental disclosure questionnaire must accompany each application.

3. Applications must be typed or printed in ink. Applications that are incomplete or illegible

will be returned.

4. A maximum 640 acres or 1 whole section is permitted per application.

5. An exploration permit is valid for one (1) year, renewable up to five (5) years.

6. Lease boundaries, access routes, mine workings, roads, water sources, residences,

utilities, etc. must be plotted separately on a USGS Topographic Map included with the

application.

7. The application must be signed by the applicant(s) or an authorized agent. If an agent is

filing for the applicant, a notarized Power of Attorney must be filled with the Department.

The filing fee for a Power of Attorney is $50.00.

8. The processing of an Exploration Permit takes a minimum of sixty (60) days.

9. Application is reviewed by the ASLD Minerals Section and if necessary, other ASLD

divisions, outside agencies and any interested parties.

10. Rent is $2.00 per acre for first year which includes the second year and $1.00 per acre

per year for years three thru five.

11. An Exploration Plan of Operation must be submitted annually and approved by the

ASLD prior to startup of exploration activities.

12. If any surface disturbance is planned as part on the exploration activities, Archaeological

and Biological surveys as well as any other applicable permits must be submitted for

ASLD review (three (3) copies of each and an electronic copy in pdf format).

13. A bond is established based on the proposed exploration activities. Typically a

$3,000.00 bond is required for a single permit or a blanket bond of $15,000.00 for five or

more permits held by an individual or company.

14. Minimum work expenditure requirements are:

$10 per acre per year for years 1-2; and

$20 per acre per year for years 3-5.

Proof of work expenditures must be submitted to the ASLD Minerals Section each year

in the form of invoices and paid receipts. If no work was completed on-site, the applicant

can pay the equal amount to the department.

15. An exploration permit is NOT a right to mine.

16. If discovery of a valuable mineral deposit is made, the permitee must apply for a mineral

lease before actual mining activities can begin.

After proving a resource you can apply for a mining permit.

RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES NOT ALLOWED ON STATE LANDS UNDER ANY PERMIT:

• Target shooting, paint ball games, fireworks

• Non-recreational or extended camping

• Recreational flying

• Visiting prehistoric and historic cultural or archaeological sites

• Metal detecting

• Collecting or removing natural products (rocks, stone, soil, fossils, mineral specimens, cacti, saguaro or cholla skeletons, plants (live or dead), or firewood for home use

• Rock crawling or rock hopping

nvchris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There seems to be some confusion on what is allowed on state trust land (how they got the land is another debate)

State land is open for prospecting contrary to sawmills belief. And big jeff is only talking about recreational use.

Mineral Exploration application. Which is totally different from recreational activities, Starting at $3500 (less rent)you can get a section to play with. Nothing in the regs that say you cant use a metal detector for Mineral Exploration.

Just pay the fee and dot the I's

Arizona State Land Department

EXPLORATION PERMIT APPLICATION

1. A non-refundable filing fee of $500.00 is required for each application.

2. An environmental disclosure questionnaire must accompany each application.

3. Applications must be typed or printed in ink. Applications that are incomplete or illegible

will be returned.

4. A maximum 640 acres or 1 whole section is permitted per application.

5. An exploration permit is valid for one (1) year, renewable up to five (5) years.

6. Lease boundaries, access routes, mine workings, roads, water sources, residences,

utilities, etc. must be plotted separately on a USGS Topographic Map included with the

application.

7. The application must be signed by the applicant(s) or an authorized agent. If an agent is

filing for the applicant, a notarized Power of Attorney must be filled with the Department.

The filing fee for a Power of Attorney is $50.00.

8. The processing of an Exploration Permit takes a minimum of sixty (60) days.

9. Application is reviewed by the ASLD Minerals Section and if necessary, other ASLD

divisions, outside agencies and any interested parties.

10. Rent is $2.00 per acre for first year which includes the second year and $1.00 per acre

per year for years three thru five.

11. An Exploration Plan of Operation must be submitted annually and approved by the

ASLD prior to startup of exploration activities.

12. If any surface disturbance is planned as part on the exploration activities, Archaeological

and Biological surveys as well as any other applicable permits must be submitted for

ASLD review (three (3) copies of each and an electronic copy in pdf format).

13. A bond is established based on the proposed exploration activities. Typically a

$3,000.00 bond is required for a single permit or a blanket bond of $15,000.00 for five or

more permits held by an individual or company.

14. Minimum work expenditure requirements are:

$10 per acre per year for years 1-2; and

$20 per acre per year for years 3-5.

Proof of work expenditures must be submitted to the ASLD Minerals Section each year

in the form of invoices and paid receipts. If no work was completed on-site, the applicant

can pay the equal amount to the department.

15. An exploration permit is NOT a right to mine.

16. If discovery of a valuable mineral deposit is made, the permitee must apply for a mineral

lease before actual mining activities can begin.

After proving a resource you can apply for a mining permit.

RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES NOT ALLOWED ON STATE LANDS UNDER ANY PERMIT:

• Target shooting, paint ball games, fireworks

• Non-recreational or extended camping

• Recreational flying

• Visiting prehistoric and historic cultural or archaeological sites

• Metal detecting

• Collecting or removing natural products (rocks, stone, soil, fossils, mineral specimens, cacti, saguaro or cholla skeletons, plants (live or dead), or firewood for home use

• Rock crawling or rock hopping

nvchris

Wow Chris, great post. Neat and concise. Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Back to square one. I don't know why the state is opposed to people metal detecting. Maybe it's because the can't tax it like cigarettes and beer. Are there any publications or guides for metal detecting on state and federal lands? Where can you go without being fined and arrested? Thanks for all the information.

Wow Chris, great post. Neat and concise. Thanks
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Arch,

The best way for a beginner is to join a club. There are several in AZ with more claims then you could hunt in a lifetime.

Do a google search for prospecting clubs. One I will recommend is Road Runners.

Here is some other links to explore.

LR 2000

Geo Communicator

Detectoraid.com how did that one get in there :)

good luck and welcome to the greatest hobby!

nvchris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the words of encouragement ant tips. I'm going to go out on an outing with a club that I am in the process of joining. Thanks again. Have a good afternoon.

Arch,

The best way for a beginner is to join a club. There are several in AZ with more claims then you could hunt in a lifetime.

Do a google search for prospecting clubs. One I will recommend is Road Runners.

Here is some other links to explore.

LR 2000

Geo Communicator

Detectoraid.com how did that one get in there :)

good luck and welcome to the greatest hobby!

nvchris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Earl and NV Chris

As usual you guys seem to miss the point.

Arch asked the question as a newbe with a GMT. That falls into recreational

prospecting.

Commercial prospecting is allowed ,but the process is costly,and more complex

than the basic details NV Chris gave.

Recreational mining,metal detecting,and prospecting is not allowed on State

land period,and you can not get a permit for recreational prospecting.

Yes the State is stepping up patrolling their mineral type land areas. My post

was about saving some new guy from getting into a big mess,not Big Brother.

They are not just looking for prospectors. They are watching for all illegal

activities,and just conducting normal business.

Arch I don't know why,but the Utah Fish and Game can find a poacher and

convict him 350 miles away in just a few days. But the other cops can't find

a bank robber in the police station. Probably because the F&G are actually out

there doing what they are paid for.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They have their priorities mixed up. Metal detecting and prospecting are clean-cut hobbies that don't harm anyone. They should be out there looking for criminals and not people just enjoying the great outdoors and pursuing their pastime. Thanks to you and the rest for your comments.

Earl and NV Chris

As usual you guys seem to miss the point.

Arch asked the question as a newbe with a GMT. That falls into recreational

prospecting.

Commercial prospecting is allowed ,but the process is costly,and more complex

than the basic details NV Chris gave.

Recreational mining,metal detecting,and prospecting is not allowed on State

land period,and you can not get a permit for recreational prospecting.

Yes the State is stepping up patrolling their mineral type land areas. My post

was about saving some new guy from getting into a big mess,not Big Brother.

They are not just looking for prospectors. They are watching for all illegal

activities,and just conducting normal business.

Arch I don't know why,but the Utah Fish and Game can find a poacher and

convict him 350 miles away in just a few days. But the other cops can't find

a bank robber in the police station. Probably because the F&G are actually out

there doing what they are paid for.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Arch

State land is private land,and not subject to public land use.

By law the State has to manage it as an income producing property .

They have to get the highest return,they can get. That is why they

will only give mineral exploration permits,to real commercial mining

operators,with certified geologist, and mining engineers.

The permit NV Chris outlined is just the basic permit to start the process.

It sounds simple until you read the fine print. Depending on the type of

exploration ,the bonds can go into the millions,and you can only take controlled

samples. If you do find something,then all the permits and bonding ,plus the time

to get them is staggering.

Also there is no real guarantee ,that you will get the permits to mine,after all

your trouble. Plus the State will be looking over your shoulder 24/7. If you had

a legal staff,lots of cash,mining engineers,geologist,and a big time credit rating,

and bonding history,the State would be interested. They don't want to split a few

ounces with some week end warrior.

They already get your gas and other taxes spent on your hobby,so why would

they consider letting you dig up their gold? :laught16:

State land can be sold or traded,so they try to keep it as undamaged as possible.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess I can't complain for its free advice. I just have to do my homework. I'm going to join the prospecting club for now and see how it comes. Maybe I'll meet someone who can give me some tips as to good spots that won't get me thrown in jail or fined. Thanks again.

Geeeeeeeeez! One simple little question. :Huh_anim]: So how do ya like the gang so far Arch :confused0013:
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've seen a number of small placer operations on Arizona State Trust land at Rich Hill over the years- all of them unsucessful and some of them were even part time. As long as the State can make money- I think just about anyone can apply and get a permit for mining in certain areas . Depends on the circumstances within each district.

Steve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sawmill,

My post was directed at your (and big jeff's) comments. Not Archs original question.

Having gone through the permitting process I have first hand knowledge.

Point is you can do it as a small exploration outfit without a huge bankroll or staff.

The key is having someone who knows the process. Let me know if you need help in this area.

nvchris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

nvchris,

At a minimum, how much would a small operation cost? Thank you for the help.

Regards

Sawmill,

My post was directed at your (and big jeff's) comments. Not Archs original question.

Having gone through the permitting process I have first hand knowledge.

Point is you can do it as a small exploration outfit without a huge bankroll or staff.

The key is having someone who knows the process. Let me know if you need help in this area.

nvchris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...