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is this a pallasite meteorite - another new guy with pics


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I picked this up sometime in the last 25- 30 years and pocketed it because I thought it was sort of special and interesting. It's a little nothing that I'll take a look at it every now and again along with various other stuff gleaned from the earth while hunting, wandering or simply looking at what might have tumbled down of an embankment after a good rain, and now I want to know; is this a meteorite?

www.flickr.com/photos/54724843@N00/sets/72157614350590170/

I put some pics up on Flicker and before I do anything stupid with it, like trying to saw it open with a Dremel before knowing if that would be a mistake, I thought some of the folks here might take a look and tell me what they think. All that I know about it is posted there.

This pic shows one of the crystals slightly illuminated from the back/side. As far as I can tell, it is intact.

Cheers

post-22271-1243818442_thumb.jpg

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"have you made any serious effort to research and classify your rock?"

Yes, I've been looking at a number of sites and cross-checking the descriptions of meteorites and non-meteorites against what I can observe in my stone. The more I checked, the more I became convinced I have a stony-iron meteorite. After emailing a local university science department professor whom specializes in observational astronomy, astronomy education, I resumed reading on the web, to check again if I missed something. The Professor may or may not be available to have a look/see, I have yet to hear back from her, and short of cutting it, this was the next step in my 'research and classification'.

As I said in the original post, I had posted all I knew on Flicker and had hoped folks after seeing that, would read it there, however here is the same content, cut and pasted.

This is a small oval shaped, non-magnetic metallic stone, about the size of a large table grape.

It is embedded with small crystals which appear white, yellow-brown and reddish. Several of the red crystals are easy to see without aid, but a 30x handheld, illuminated microscope and a 40x loupe are needed to view the the other crystals in detail.

The stone has black areas which, when viewed under magnification, appear to have been melted. The surface is pockmarked and the high areas, especially around the 'pits', show what looks to be flowing toward the low areas.

There are also a number of thin flow-lines easily seen with the loupe, the majority of which move along the long axis toward ends of the stone. These are mainly in the brown areas of the stone.

The rest of the surface seems to have oxidized to a brown color.

The metal does not attract a nickel sized rare-earth magnet and has no effect on a large Bunton compass needle

The stone weighed, on a RCBS 5.0.5. powder scale which is accurate to 1/10 of a grain (7000 grains to the U.S. pound) is 495.6 grains, or 32.1143398 grams.

Suspended in tap water at 72ยบ F, the stone weighs approximately 372 grains or 24.1051945 grams.

If I did the math correctly, this is a Specific Gravity of 4.00971

I used an 08 kevlar fly thread, one end dipped in thick 'super glue' to attach to the more blunted end of the stone and though I used a touch of acetone to remove most of the glue, a white residue and fine fibers from the thread remain and can be seen in a few of the pics.

I don't have a stand alone, digital still camera so these pics were taken with this Macbook iSight camera with the plastic element of a disposable camera taped over the Macbooks' lens. The small flashlight of the 30x microscope was used for illumination.

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No meteorite that I know of has red crystals in them. Sorry- it's not a meteorite. And that's just for starters. How can you be convinced it's a meteorite if it's not even attracted to a magnet? That's just one of the criteria your specimen doesn't meet. There's others too.

Steve

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In my online reading, I noted that not all iron-nickel meteorites are magnetic so I can't automatically discount the possibility out-of-hand, however rare those findings are.

Because the stone is so small and because of the things that fit what I've read and observed, I do not want to cut or file away any portion yet, it is too early in my questioning.

As to the colour of the crystals, please keep in mind that the camera is simply a throw-away camera plastic lens positioned over the computers isight camera.

The light source is dirty, a combination of computer generated 'flash', household fluorescent and white led or incandescent flashlight.

The pics can only observe the larger crystals under what I think is a metal fusion crust on both ends of the stone, not the true colour of the crystals.

Looking at pics online of pallasite sections, I see crystals that appear similar to the reddish brown I see in my stone, as well as the smaller clear or white and yellowish stones that are more easily seen with the loupe.

Steve, what other items don't fit?

Eli

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Eli...you did do some research, that is good! Next time post your results and your question if you want to avoid questions like mine...

Pray tell; where did you read that a nickel/iron meteorite could be unattracted to a magnet...there are meteorites with no iron in them but I think they would all be planetary...

good effort

Fred

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Fred, I didn't bookmark the pages I looked at, a real mistake this time and now I regret it. I do believe I read this (and read it correctly) in a JPL or NASA study page, but using some of the search terms I used earlier, like "non-magnetic stony-irons" for a quick search yields no joy, oh well... :innocent0009:

I took a small cut out of the stone, less than a gram I believe, and it seems to be mostly a large orange-purple crystal, though there is a bright yellow-orange section that has beautiful, iridescence green, blue and other colours. I used a dremel, with a thin diamond wheel, to cut this and the blade threw the section I was cutting when it hit what I think is metal, but the two ledges are hard to examine without strong sunlight because of the angles.

I also took my small LED light and in a darkened room, placed it on the stone is several places and it glowed through in a few areas with the same dull orange like colour I described above.

Because of the weight, read specific gravity, my next speculation is it might be a gemstone but I'll wait until I can get an 'expert' to look at it before doing anything else.

Thanks everyone for the feedback, even though it wasn't the good news I hoped for.

Eli

Eli...you did do some research, that is good! Next time post your results and your question if you want to avoid questions like mine...

Pray tell; where did you read that a nickel/iron meteorite could be unattracted to a magnet...there are meteorites with no iron in them but I think they would all be planetary...

good effort

Fred

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