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I am thinking of going out this weekend. Can anyone tell me if the ground being soaked, will this effect the detecting?

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I am thinking of going out this weekend. Can anyone tell me if the ground being soaked, will this effect the detecting?

I think it will help you!

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I am thinking of going out this weekend. Can anyone tell me if the ground being soaked, will this effect the detecting?

Aloha,

I know from past experience that using my GMT with the goldmax sierra coil I actually had to "tune it down" somewhat as I was getting more sensitivity from the wet ground. Good lcuk whatever unit you are using.

Aloha,

Stan aka Kaimi

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Guest bedrock bob

That is a great question.

I have always thought that it helped depth and sensitivity. Some days it seems to make hot ground behave better and in one particular spot it makes quiet ground a lot noisier, but it SEEMS to help quite a bit. Go figure. The fine grass sound off on a sensitive VLF if it is damp or dewy. Dry dirt is a lot easier to recover a small target from and it dosent chew up your bare hands as fast as wet dirt does.

Has anyone done a test bed of targets and compared wet to dry? Ever heard of anyone doing that?

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That is a great question.

I have always thought that it helped depth and sensitivity. Some days it seems to make hot ground behave better and in one particular spot it makes quiet ground a lot noisier, but it SEEMS to help quite a bit. Go figure. The fine grass sound off on a sensitive VLF if it is damp or dewy. Dry dirt is a lot easier to recover a small target from and it dosent chew up your bare hands as fast as wet dirt does.

Has anyone done a test bed of targets and compared wet to dry? Ever heard of anyone doing that?

We all know that gold does not decay or corrode. But Wet ground does help with the Halo effect in the ground.

It may help with associated minerals carried with the gold., Iron, Copper what ever.

With out a doubt it also helps the Iron, Salts and other none Target stuff show up.

But over all I would rather hunt it.

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I always do better when the ground is wet, like others have said it does seem to increase the sensitivity of the machine. I have found that as the ground dries up I get a little more noise as the ground doesn't seem to always dry evenly. Seems weird but I think that it leaves spots that stay wet longer.

Good Luck, Wes

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My experiences have proven to me that in highly mineralized ground, I lost depth on nuggets when the ground was wet. The mineral salts seem to become conductive when the ground is wet and the ground becomes noisey. Iron trash becomes very loud in damp ground. I believe that a lot of the signal is reflected back and does not penetrate at depth. I have recovered very deep nuggets with a VLF when the ground was super dry. Pulse detectors may react differently.

Maybe Reg will explain it or add his opinion.

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My experiences have proven to me that in highly mineralized ground, I lost depth on nuggets when the ground was wet. The mineral salts seem to become conductive when the ground is wet and the ground becomes noisey. Iron trash becomes very loud in damp ground. I believe that a lot of the signal is reflected back and does not penetrate at depth. I have recovered very deep nuggets with a VLF when the ground was super dry. Pulse detectors may react differently.

Maybe Reg will explain it or add his opinion.

Down here in southern New Mexico Volcanic crap, Hot Rocks and other junk.

Ground Balance is the thing with the VLF!

I have a Old PI and it punches through all of that hitting on the hot rocks and Iron junk.

Good Ground Balance and I can do at least 3 or 4 inches better in damp soil or earth.

You would get tired of digging with the PI.

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Hi Jim,

The issue of whether one can detect deeper or whether the ground is noisier or quieter when wet generally is a question more commonly discussed by VLF users in my opinion. However being noisier might be one for PI's also.

The problem with trying to determine just what happens is not easy to explain since the ground conditions change with the type of ground involved. As an example, sandy areas are not the same nor do they react the same as areas with high clay concentrations. So, there can be and are differences in ground conditions from location to location.

Eric Foster did some rather strange experiments some time back using certain rocks obtained from OZ. What he found was such rocks would change characteristics with temperature. So, if a person were to ground balance one of these rocks at a certain temperature and test that same rock later after the rock had time to increase temperature because of the heat from the sun, the rock signal changed.

Now, what does this have to do with moisture? Well, the amount of moisture in the ground could have an effect on just how much temperature change may happen. It could explain the "spotty" condition mentioned in a previous post also. The amount of moisture could do something as alter the amount of change that occurs.

One other note regarding moisture and noise, areas in general locations may have more noise than others because of large electrical transmissions requiring earth grounding. Keep in mind that electricity travels much better in conductive ground. In other words, places such as Gold Basin may have more noise simply because of the large generators at the dam and this may show up more at times than at others and it may be because of the moisture in the ground.

So, there are lots of reasons for different results that are not easy to explain or even prove for that matter. I gave up long ago trying to predict what I might find. I do still try to figure out why things happen but that is really hard to do without a really thorough investigation and even then, the true explanation may remain hidden.

As a perfect example, high voltage power lines are spaced apart for a reason. The electrical fields from the wires do interact. So, it is possible that electrical fields from such lines could generate a signal in something as simple as the wire in a barb wire fence. Now, such signal may travel long distances or it may terminate quickly. Much of what happens just may be because of any moisture present. Who knows for sure without extensive measuring and even then it would be extremely hard to measure the levels that could influence a detector.

Reg

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Hi Jim,

The issue of whether one can detect deeper or whether the ground is noisier or quieter when wet generally is a question more commonly discussed by VLF users in my opinion. However being noisier might be one for PI's also.

The problem with trying to determine just what happens is not easy to explain since the ground conditions change with the type of ground involved. As an example, sandy areas are not the same nor do they react the same as areas with high clay concentrations. So, there can be and are differences in ground conditions from location to location.

Eric Foster did some rather strange experiments some time back using certain rocks obtained from OZ. What he found was such rocks would change characteristics with temperature. So, if a person were to ground balance one of these rocks at a certain temperature and test that same rock later after the rock had time to increase temperature because of the heat from the sun, the rock signal changed.

Now, what does this have to do with moisture? Well, the amount of moisture in the ground could have an effect on just how much temperature change may happen. It could explain the "spotty" condition mentioned in a previous post also. The amount of moisture could do something as alter the amount of change that occurs.

One other note regarding moisture and noise, areas in general locations may have more noise than others because of large electrical transmissions requiring earth grounding. Keep in mind that electricity travels much better in conductive ground. In other words, places such as Gold Basin may have more noise simply because of the large generators at the dam and this may show up more at times than at others and it may be because of the moisture in the ground.

So, there are lots of reasons for different results that are not easy to explain or even prove for that matter. I gave up long ago trying to predict what I might find. I do still try to figure out why things happen but that is really hard to do without a really thorough investigation and even then, the true explanation may remain hidden.

As a perfect example, high voltage power lines are spaced apart for a reason. The electrical fields from the wires do interact. So, it is possible that electrical fields from such lines could generate a signal in something as simple as the wire in a barb wire fence. Now, such signal may travel long distances or it may terminate quickly. Much of what happens just may be because of any moisture present. Who knows for sure without extensive measuring and even then it would be extremely hard to measure the levels that could influence a detector.

Reg

Reg makes a good point. For a while I lived in a rural area in Sonoma County CA. I arrived home one night and it looked like there was a glow from a cigarette on the hill, 50 feet away from the house. After parking the car I went to investigate and discovered it was a glow on a fence (maybe 4 inch square mesh) where the wire was twisted together.

We had an electrician come out the next day. Using his instruments he was able to determine there was a short and discovered that a mouse had crawled into the conduit somewhere between the pole box and the house breaker box and electrocuted itself chewing on the insulation. That conduit had become a conductor in contact with the soil. The post was close to where the glow was and the glow was the electricity which was conducted through fairly damp (winter rains of NorCal) soil to the fence.

Because we had evidence of the problem from the electrician we were able to get an adjustment on our bill, which was way out of line with our normal usage.

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We have some of the High Tension type lines running not far from the house.

I was working for a Fiber optic outfit one time .

They ran fiber on those pylons by replacing the FOG (Forward Overhead Ground) Lines.

370,000 volts those puppies were working with.

Every time you grabed the door handle on you truck you would get shocked just from the power being inducted to the vehicle. :tisc-tisc:

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