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NewBe

Yaestodays finds and some where im in doubt.

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How much does a very small meteorite for practice cost? Thanks again to all for the help. Have a good evening.

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Good Idea if you're only going to hunt for the small percentage of meteorites that are IRONS. Heck, any cheap Radio Shack detector can find a large-enough iron - good luck. The overwhelming number of meteorites that are to be found, are CHONDRITES that can only be found with certain detectors. They are going to be a completely different challenge, needing a detector that is sensitive enough, yet can handle high ground-mineralization unlike coin machines. Get a sample of what you're actually going to hunt for, and use a machine that can actually find it. If you've got a plane-ticket to China, get the Nantan. If not buy a chondrite and order take-out.

Good Hunting, Ben

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Oh boy here we go again... some guy who knows better than experienced meteorite hunters. Mikael apparently you think we're a bunch of idiots who have no clue what were talking about. Since we all know where this is going, perhaps you should try another meteorite forum. The people who post on the Sky Rock Cafe don't seem to mind identifying meteorwrongs (we like to see the real deal here), in fact they have a special section dedicated solely to meteorite identification. Here's the link to that forum-

Sky Rock Cafe

One more word of advice before you go- try taking an intoductory Geology class at your local college because this will help you with basic rock identification.

Del

Well if i was thinking that you are an idiot i would have told you that you are an idiot, i would even cut it out in carton send with post because i want to be sure that you get the mesege.

all thought even the museum of geolegi could not tell what it was i found so now i have to wait 4 month before i get an answer.

I do not think that im a expert because do not now every name of every stone but i have 18 year of experience so do now what earth stones look like.

Here are all the fossilse i have found throu the years.

http://i578.photobucket.com/albums/ss223/M...en/P6220278.jpg

Here is 1/10 of all the earth rocks i have colected or werthy of taking home.

http://i578.photobucket.com/albums/ss223/M...en/P6220280.jpg

Here is the same hunker from a nother side and some of chondrulls.

http://i578.photobucket.com/albums/ss223/M...en/P6010154.jpg

http://i578.photobucket.com/albums/ss223/M...en/P6010155.jpg

http://i578.photobucket.com/albums/ss223/M...en/P6220273.jpg

As some one said her in forum. Hunting is different from place to place.

Good hunting.

Mikael.

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Well if i was thinking that you are an idiot i would have told you that you are an idiot, i would even cut it out in carton send with post because i want to be sure that you get the mesege.

all thought even the museum of geolegi could not tell what it was i found so now i have to wait 4 month before i get an answer.

I do not think that im a expert because do not now every name of every stone but i have 18 year of experience so do now what earth stones look like.

Here are all the fossilse i have found throu the years.

http://i578.photobucket.com/albums/ss223/M...en/P6220278.jpg

Here is 1/10 of all the earth rocks i have colected or werthy of taking home.

http://i578.photobucket.com/albums/ss223/M...en/P6220280.jpg

Here is the same hunker from a nother side and some of chondrulls.

http://i578.photobucket.com/albums/ss223/M...en/P6010154.jpg

http://i578.photobucket.com/albums/ss223/M...en/P6010155.jpg

http://i578.photobucket.com/albums/ss223/M...en/P6220273.jpg

As some one said her in forum. Hunting is different from place to place.

Good hunting.

Mikael.

Hi Mikael, I will say you have half of the equation right (deflation), but there's absolutely no way a meteorite is going to stay preserved for a long period of time on a coastline. The saltwater environment will eat up a chondrite in probably a few years. For the most part the people who regularly post finds on this forum hunt in the Soutwest deserts of the United States. Why? Because the hot and dry atmosphere is a conducive environment for preserving meteorites.

I am a Southern California native and am fully aware of what a saltwater beach environment is like (I used to surf a lot a few years back). I also live half an hour away from any number of Southern California beaches. Trust me if I could hunt the beaches for meteorites instead of putting up with 110 degree heat I'd do it in a hearbeat! But since I know the high salt content in the soil and the damp air will eat meteorites up so I don't bother wasting my time hunting for meteorites there. Instead I focus my efforts on hunting the deserts a few hours drive away from me.

You're abviously still convinced you've found meteorites and there's nothing I or anyone else can tell you to convince you otherwise. I've lost count now how many times I've ran into people like you that are abslutely convinced they've found the real deal. So I'll tell you the same thing that I always revert to saying when I run into stubborn people who believe they've found one- If you're convinced you've found a meteorite by all means you've found a meteorite, however just remember... whatever you say or do WILL NOT turn your rocks into a meteorite. Don't expect a positive response on this forum when you are obviously not finding meteorites because we all like to see the real deal on this forum.

There's a lot of very good sucessfull meteorite hunters that took time out of their days and helped you out with some very good advice for finding the real deal. My advice to you is to take this information and run with it. Maybe before to long you will be sucessfull in finding a real meteorite, I wish you the best of luck in your hunting adventures.

Sheesh won't this topic just die!! I'm done with this!!

Del

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Come on Del let us have a good laugh we need it with the way the economy is going, besides the last time I was in Ca. we almost got taking to jail by two of your fine officers that thought it was fun to harass my wife and me. We were hunting a dry lake bed out of Bakers Ca.

They asked if I knew were I was, and here all this time I thought that the dye was doing a great job of hiding my age. I guess not !

It must have been the NV tag that got them going, gee I thought that I was still in the casino shooting dice, what the hell I am I doing out here looking for meteorites ?

I must be getting old !

You are missing one point here, that I don't think you realize.

For one thing we all know now not to go looking on the beach for meteorites, we now have some good photos of meteorite wrongs, and one more guy that won't give up looking till he can prove you wrong.

Look you have to have a sense of humor, when you post on any board, someone will always doubt what you say, as they have more expertise then you even when they have only been doing what you do for one weekend.

But if we read between the line we all find out something new, so don't chastise the new guy, just read between the lines.

Some day he might find that new strew Field, anything is possible .

Just look back in time we all started some where, and you had a lot of help getting were you are today, I don't think that I have to mention all there names, you know who they are, and we do too.

Hope to see you out in the field when it cools down, but then I was thinking maybe I will just look out on the beach when I go back to Fla. next month, neat way to stay cool.

Rick and Connie

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Hi Mikael, I will say you have half of the equation right (deflation), but there's absolutely no way a meteorite is going to stay preserved for a long period of time on a coastline. The saltwater environment will eat up a chondrite in probably a few years. For the most part the people who regularly post finds on this forum hunt in the Soutwest deserts of the United States. Why? Because the hot and dry atmosphere is a conducive environment for preserving meteorites.

I am a Southern California native and am fully aware of what a saltwater beach environment is like (I used to surf a lot a few years back). I also live half an hour away from any number of Southern California beaches. Trust me if I could hunt the beaches for meteorites instead of putting up with 110 degree heat I'd do it in a hearbeat! But since I know the high salt content in the soil and the damp air will eat meteorites up so I don't bother wasting my time hunting for meteorites there. Instead I focus my efforts on hunting the deserts a few hours drive away from me.

You're abviously still convinced you've found meteorites and there's nothing I or anyone else can tell you to convince you otherwise. I've lost count now how many times I've ran into people like you that are abslutely convinced they've found the real deal. So I'll tell you the same thing that I always revert to saying when I run into stubborn people who believe they've found one- If you're convinced you've found a meteorite by all means you've found a meteorite, however just remember... whatever you say or do WILL NOT turn your rocks into a meteorite. Don't expect a positive response on this forum when you are obviously not finding meteorites because we all like to see the real deal on this forum.

There's a lot of very good sucessfull meteorite hunters that took time out of their days and helped you out with some very good advice for finding the real deal. My advice to you is to take this information and run with it. Maybe before to long you will be sucessfull in finding a real meteorite, I wish you the best of luck in your hunting adventures.

Sheesh won't this topic just die!! I'm done with this!!

Del

Well i know that you have the Pacific on one side and the Atlantic on the other side, theise are big oceans and produces big waves wll huge waves no wonder you dont find any thing there and the content of salt is quite high.

The Estern sea is like a big fresh water toilet if it wasent conected to the Northsea and the north sea to the Atlantic. (All) the rivers in EU are running out in the eastsea so, there is less salt in, i can compare it Stockholms Skærgården where the water is allmost without salt. Any way i have a 10 minute walk from here to the beach. Here in DK there is salt every where but somehow peaple find them, not to mention Cape York and to mention the 22.2 ton iron that in the courtyard of the Musuem and the 2 smaller ones. Never the less there have been 2 huge fire balls well 3 caunting the one that i saw at 0015 this morning over passing and some of them going down in this region.

Well i hava to wait untill the Museum of Geolegy will come with an answer as they could not tell me what it was then i can post who right and who is wrong.

Now i will go to the beach and pee into the water waving a Danish flag and shout -eat this you Swedish ..... .-

Good Hunting

Mikael.

In 4 month

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Mikael:

You have some very interesting specimens there, but they do not look like meteorites.

To make sure, take them to a University and have them tested; that is the only way to know for sure.

Check this out though, it's from an article:

"The closest meteorite to Santa Barbara County happened in 1956 on a beach in Ventura. It's called Ventura Iron and it's on display at the Natural History Museum in Los Angeles."

post-3520-1246567622_thumb.jpg

So you just never know,

Happy Hunting

Greg

Ventura_Iron_Meteorite.bmp

Ventura_Iron_Meteorite.bmp

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Amygdaloidal basalt is one that really confuses me and definitely sticks to a magnet and gets my heart racing then when I cut a corner window the "chondrules" are all disappointingly white. What really adds to the confusion is that in the filed window you look and there are also rust spots! How this rock emulates chondrites is amazing! It's like when one is looking for edible mushrooms there are poisonous ones that look almost the same as the edible ones! Really emphasizes the importance of study.

And we must never give up!

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Hey Mikael

You need to ask John B. If there is anyone that can tell a meteorite from a picture its John. Good Luck

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