Jump to content
Nugget Shooter Forums

Recommended Posts

Has anyone noticed if meteorites have a particular trajectory when entering the atmosphere such as finding them on the western or eastern side of a hill?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Butter,

No. The trajectory is only particular to a given fall, and even then, some strewn fields seem to have finds on the "wrong" side of a hill because of multiple, or low-level detonations. Even the wind direction at the time of the fall, will cause drift from an established trajectory, or direction.

Ben

Link to post
Share on other sites

The reason why I ask I have spent around 20 hours in the woods so far looking for a meteorite with no luck yet. I have a whites 6000D I have it set to pick up any metal and I am digging up every thing from horse shoes to bullets I am already thinking of getting a pulse induction metal detector to improve my odds of a find. If anyone has any suggestions it would be a big help

Link to post
Share on other sites
The reason why I ask I have spent around 20 hours in the woods so far looking for a meteorite with no luck yet. I have a whites 6000D I have it set to pick up any metal and I am digging up every thing from horse shoes to bullets I am already thinking of getting a pulse induction metal detector to improve my odds of a find. If anyone has any suggestions it would be a big help

As the Earth is spinning from West to East, Any object picked up in its path would then tend to fall on the west side of a geological up rise.

Link to post
Share on other sites

After some thought the earth is rotating just over 1000 mph but the orbit of the earth it 66,000 mph I think it safe to say that the earth is mostly hitting the meteorites at that speed. I would think at around 6:am I would be nearly inline with the orbit and would have the highest chance of seeing the most falls but with the sun illumining the ski hinders sight of entry. I would think I would have a “slightly higher” chance of finding one on the southern side of a mountain due to the 23 tilt of earth and a 50/50 chance from east to west. Finds on the flat lands, deserts or rolling hills probably have no bearing of meteorite finds that’s if this idea holds any water. It seems South America deserts around the 23 degree would be the idea place to cash in on meteorites finds. Then again I probably don’t know what I am talking about. :nutty:

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want an expert opinion read all three of O Richard Norton's books...Rocks from Space would be the choice for most layman...that would be us'ns that are not scientist types...

In point of fact meteorites fall from every direction and angle...and add many tons of mass to the earth every year...searching an area of a known strewn field is far more likely to produce than a random search...especially in forested areas...would you recognize a chrondrite, iron or stoney iron if you found one??? Mr Nortons Field Guide would help educate you...a field trip to a museum is a great idea too...

Good luck on your search and ...your area should certainly produce some great coins and relics while hunting space rocks..

Fred

Link to post
Share on other sites

So you are saying that some areas a person is more likely to find a meteorite compared to other areas?

Do you have any idea why this happens?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, a known strewn field is more likely to provide you with a find...looking for a random fall;and finding an unknown fall in many areas is extremly difficult. The desert you mentioned would be good because it is a desert and lacks heavy plant coverage, plus the climate preserves the meteorites...

there are many references on this forum you could review if you want to learn...

Fred

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Butter,

Fredmason is correct. Read "Rocks from Space" by Norton. He gives you a better understanding of the situation.

Meteorites can come in from any of the 360 degree directions, from any angle 90 degrees and below, at any time of the day or night. Their speeds will vary, the weather on earth will be different each times. They break up at different altitudes. In other words, there are so many variables that it will make your head spin.

I also have tried to make some kind of sense of the problem. Even in an individual strewn field such as Franconia, it is just impossible. So, quit trying to analyse it and get on with looking in strewn fields or dry lake beds.

If I may change the old adage a little bit. "Meteorites or gold ----are where you find them."

Happy hunting,

Bob

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am just trying to have an idea were to look and have the best possible chance of a find. I live in West Virginia “The Mountain State” the brush, vegetation and incline limits my search area we don’t have dry lake beds. For some reason I am excited about finding a few meteorites in this area because no one looks for them around this area. I am thinking of getting a pulse induction unit and dragging it behind a ATV in the hay fields in the area. This is a few pictures taken near were I live

tsusa_img_virginia_hawksnest.jpg

west-virginia-state-main.jpg

th_8917d742.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Butter...be aware that a PI will be very, very sensitive to any iron artifacts...large and tiny...if I were hunting that country I would work the ridges and high saddles away from farming areas with a detector...down in the farm areas I would work the fence lines, the edge of the tilled fields and throw-out rock piles that many farm areas have...this is not to say you can't find a meteorite buried in a farm field...Mr. Ninninger found them and so have some very good modern day meteorite hunters...

I notice a lack of response with regard to your reading assignments...you do want to learn...don't you?

Fred

Link to post
Share on other sites

Butter...be aware that a PI will be very, very sensitive to any iron artifacts...large and tiny...if I were hunting that country I would work the ridges and high saddles away from farming areas with a detector...down in the farm areas I would work the fence lines, the edge of the tilled fields and throw-out rock piles that many farm areas have...this is not to say you can't find a meteorite buried in a farm field...Mr. Ninninger found them and so have some very good modern day meteorite hunters...

I notice a lack of response with regard to your reading assignments...you do want to learn...don't you?

Fred

Link to post
Share on other sites

GOD The fence I hate fence, an old fence on the side of a hill you will find pieces of that old fence 50 yards or more down hill from the original fence line. The rocks from space book I will probably get a copy when I need more information on meteorites that is not available on the web. I don’t think it’s going to help me on the hunt 97% of all rocks are covered with moss or leaves few rocks are exposed and visible but only for a year or two in most places. Any thing I have a hit on I dig it up and if it remotely looks terrestrial I keep it and I have only had two possible finds out of 30+ hours of searching. If you guys think this book is a survival guide to meteorites I will pick up a copy you guys have been doing this much longer than I have.

I do have one question how do you guys work out a find with the land owner?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...