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AMERICAN WARRIORS-PAST AND PRESENT

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Can't get it back, might have something to do with copy write issues. 

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You’ll never see this picture on the front of Time Magazine, or any other magazine. 

http://i1.wp.com/www.ibov.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/20150705-female-vets03.png?fit=926%2C604

We see lots of pictures of wounded male veterans
but women vets get wounded and maimed too.
You may need to take a second, closer look though.
The first thing I saw was a bunch of beautiful smiles.
Study this picture again. Let the story it tells sink in.
These women and many others, as well as their male comrades,
paid this price for our freedoms.
And, they did it for less than what welfare recipients are paid!!!
 
There is more patriotism and class in those 11 ladies pictured
than the majority of Congress and the former White House combined!!!
And a HECK of a lot more than those over-paid athletes
who choose to “take a knee” when the National Anthem is played!!!
 
They risked these injuries (or death) FOR YOU and ME, AMERICA!
 
GOD BLESS THEM ALL !!!
 
Enjoy Life!

 

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Thanks Clay you did what I couldn't do and much better. 

Merry Christmas. 

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During the 3-1/2 years of World War II that started with the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor in December of 1941 and ended with the surrender of Germany and Japan in 1945, "We the People of the U.S.A." produced the following:
 
            22 aircraft carriers
 
            8 battleships
            48 cruisers
          349 destroyers
          420 destroyer escorts
          203 submarines
            34 million tons of merchant ships
   100,000 fighter aircraft
     98,000 bombers
     24,000 transport aircraft
     58,000 training aircraft
     93,000 tanks
   257,000 artillery pieces
   105,000 mortars
3,000,000 machine guns and
2,500,000 military trucks
 
We put 16.1 million men in uniform in the various armed services, invaded Africa, invaded Sicily and Italy, won the battle for the Atlantic, planned and executed D-Day, marched across the Pacific and Europe, developed the atomic bomb and, ultimately, conquered Japan and Germany.
 
It’s amazing what America did in those days
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Army National Guard 1985 Civilian Contractor

USCG Tracen N.J. 1986 E1/ E2

USNS Charlston 1987  E3 

USCGC Escape /USS Escape  ARS 1988 boarding officer

USCG TWO ROCK Code Talker 1990 E/4

USCG CAMSPAC 1991 Coms Operator

USNS MANTA 2003 CSI Captain

USNS MANTA 2004 Police Tactical  Dive Chief

RCMP B.C. 2005

9/11  Flight 93 2011 Chief

 Served all over this soggy blue marble including GITMO

operation Winter Night

Operation Able Vigil

Operation Pan America

Operation HIMO

Operation AIMO

Operation Desert Shield

Operation Desert Storm

9/11

Born a 5th generation military brat to an active military family and if I ever have kids they will be 6th gen or I will toss them out! 

Freedom Is not Free and if we fail to fight for it the only ones that will have freedom are those we have already buried!

 

 

 

 

IMG_0016.JPG

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Aye, Aye, Chief! Semper Fi.

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edward-murphy.jpg?ve=1&tl=1

World War II Purple Heart recipient Edward Murphy marked his 100th birthday Saturday in Georgia.

 

A World War II Purple Heart recipient who turned 100 says that age is only a number.

“Keep moving,” Edward Murphy told Fox 5 Atlanta upon reaching the milestone Saturday at a senior living facility in Lawrenceville, Ga., outside Atlanta, surrounded by friends and family members.

When he was about to be deployed with the U.S. Army’s 29th Infantry Division in Germany in 1944, Murphy placed a photo of the Virgin Mary in his helmet, the Gwinnett Daily Post reported.

His mother was a devout Catholic who had dedicated herself to Mary.

“(One night in battle), they were coming up against the enemy, he said, and it was a foggy night and they could not see,” his daughter, Regina Owens, told the paper. “But above on the hill was the enemy with machine guns. All of a sudden, all of his buddies went down, including my dad. His helmet came off, and he looked up, and the picture he saw in the helmet was the Blessed Mother. From that day forward, he was so devoted to her, always.”

His devotion hasn’t ever wavered.

“Whenever I had any problems, I prayed,” he told the paper. “I’m satisfied that I get to be 100.”

After the Army, Murphy was a New York City cop for 20 years and an upstate New York judge before moving to Georgia after his wife of 66 years died in 2008.

“Helping others (has kept me going),” Murphy said. “Anytime you can help someone, help them.”

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A reminder of what November 11, 2019, veterans day is about:

What Is A Veteran?

Some veterans bear visible signs of their service...a missing limb, a jagged scar, a certain look in the eye.

Others may carry the evidence inside them...a pin holding a bone together, a piece of shrapnel in the leg...or perhaps another sort of inner steel... the soul's ally forged in the refinery of adversity.

Except in parades, however, the men and women who have kept America safe wear no badge or emblem.

You can't tell a vet just by looking. What is a vet?

He is the cop on the beat who spent six months in Saudia Arabia sweating two gallons a day making sure the armored personnel carriers didn't run out of fuel.

He is the barroom loudmouth, dumber than five wooden planks, whose overgrown frat-boy behavior is outweighed a hundred times in the cosmic scales by four hours of exquisite bravery near the 38th parallel.

She or he is the nurse who fought against futility and went to sleep sobbing every night for two solid years in Da Nang.

He is the POW who went away one person and came back another - or didn't come back at all.

He is the Quantico drill instructor who has never seen combat but has saved countless lives by turning slouchy, no-account rednecks and gang members into Marines and teaching them to watch each other's backs.

He is the parade-riding Legionnaire who pins on his ribbons and medals with a prosthetic hand.

He is the career quartermaster who watches the ribbons and medals pass him by.

He is the three anonymous heroes in The Tomb Of The Unknowns whose presence at the Arlington National Cemetery must forever preserve the memory of all the anonymous heroes whose valor dies unrecognized with them on the battlefield or in the ocean's sunless deep.

He is the old guy bagging groceries at the supermarket - palsied now and aggravatingly slow who helped liberate a Nazi death camp and who wishes all day long that his wife were still alive to hold him when the nightmares come.

He is an ordinary and yet an extraordinary human being - a person who offered some of his life's most vital years in the service of his country and who sacrificed his ambitions so others would not have to sacrifice theirs.

He is a soldier and a savior and a sword against the darkness and he is nothing more than the finest, greatest testimony on behalf of the finest, greatest nation ever known.

He is the beggar on the street corner, holding up a piece of cardboard with the scribbling, "Help a Vet, HUNGRY!"

So remember, each time you see someone who has served our country, just lean over and say Thank You. That's all most people need and in most cases it will mean more than any medals they could have been awarded or were awarded. Two little words that mean a lot, "THANK YOU"!

 

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We should remind others of the following observation from Army veteran Charles M. Province:
 
It is the Soldier, not the minister, who has given us freedom of religion.
 
It is the Soldier, not the reporter, who has given us freedom of the press.
 
It is the Soldier, not the poet, who has given us freedom of speech.
 
It is the Soldier, not the campus organizer, who has given us freedom to protest.
 
It is the Soldier, not the lawyer, who has given us the right to a fair trial.
 
It is the Soldier, not the politician, who has given us the right to vote.
 
It is the Soldier who salutes the flag,
Who serves beneath the flag,
And whose coffin is draped by the flag,
Who allows the protester to burn the flag.
 
 
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I raised my hand,  USAF 1979 months before graduating high school and waited 5 mos delayed enlistment for a tech school opening at Chanute AFB, weather tech course.

Worked NORAD 26AD, Luke AFB to Gila Bend Range and Europe to Central America. It was amazing.

Father was WWII Navy vet and I have two kids that earned their USMC Combat Badges, Iraq.

Big thanks to all our vets.

 

 

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Wishing a Happy Veterans Day to all.

Especially the Families of those who served. 

Yes, they too sacrificed.

To those who did serve,  Thank You for Being You.  Thank You for being AMERICAN. 

 

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Happy Veterans Day to All that served & are going to serve. My Father was Navy my Brother was USAF & myself Navy !!!!!

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6 hours ago, Edge said:

I raised my hand,  USAF 1979 months before graduating high school and waited 5 mos delayed enlistment for a tech school opening at Chanute AFB, weather tech course.

Worked NORAD 26AD, Luke AFB to Gila Bend Range and Europe to Central America. It was amazing.

Father was WWII Navy vet and I have two kids that earned their USMC Combat Badges, Iraq.

Big thanks to all our vets.

 

 

I went through Jet eng Mechanic school at Chanute in Dec. of 1980. Coldest I have ever been in my life!  Used to go to Champagne/Urbana and run around on the weekends. :)
Tom H.

 

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1 hour ago, TomH said:

I went through Jet eng Mechanic school at Chanute in Dec. of 1980. Coldest I have ever been in my life!  Used to go to Champagne/Urbana and run around on the weekends. :)
Tom H.

 

Just missed me, I left 10/80

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Navy, in the fifty's before ballistic missiles.  They came in and there was no defense against them.  Completely changed format of defense on both coasts and went in more for diplomacy.  Did away with both early warning fleets.  

   Old Tom       

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I'm happy for those that choose to serve in the future.  Finding recruits is a hard job.  Back in 88 when I enlisted, four in five were eligible to join, but now because of obesity, criminal records, and substance abuse, the number of military age males eligible for enlistment is 1 in 4 or 1 in 5.  Only 20% - 25% of all high school grads would be eligible for a trip to basic.

God bless those that  are and those that choose.

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A NEW CHRISTMAS POEM
 
 
TWAS THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS,
HE LIVED ALL ALONE,
IN A ONE BEDROOM HOUSE MADE OF
PLASTER AND STONE.
I HAD COME DOWN THE CHIMNEY
WITH PRESENTS TO GIVE,
AND TO SEE JUST WHO
IN THIS HOME DID LIVE.
I LOOKED ALL ABOUT,
A STRANGE SIGHT I DID SEE,
NO TINSEL, NO PRESENTS,
NOT EVEN A TREE.
 
NO STOCKING BY MANTLE,
JUST BOOTS FILLED WITH SAND,
ON THE WALL HUNG PICTURES
OF FAR DISTANT LANDS.
 
WITH MEDALS AND BADGES,
AWARDS OF ALL KINDS,
A SOBER THOUGHT
CAME THROUGH MY MIND.
 
FOR THIS HOUSE WAS DIFFERENT,
IT WAS DARK AND DREARY,
I FOUND THE HOME OF A SOLDIER,
ONCE I COULD SEE CLEARLY.
 
THE SOLDIER LAY SLEEPING,
SILENT, ALONE,
CURLED UP ON THE FLOOR
IN THIS ONE BEDROOM HOME.
 
THE FACE WAS SO GENTLE,
THE ROOM IN SUCH DISORDER,
NOT HOW I PICTURED
A UNITED STATES SOLDIER.
 
WAS THIS THE HERO
OF WHOM I'D JUST READ?
CURLED UP ON A PONCHO,
THE FLOOR FOR A BED?
 
I REALIZED THE FAMILIES
THAT I SAW THIS NIGHT,
OWED THEIR LIVES TO THESE SOLDIERS
WHO WERE WILLING TO FIGHT.
 
SOON ROUND THE WORLD,
THE CHILDREN WOULD PLAY,
AND GROWNUPS WOULD CELEBRATE
A BRIGHT CHRISTMAS DAY.
 
THEY ALL ENJOYED FREEDOM
EACH MONTH OF THE YEAR,
BECAUSE OF THE SOLDIERS,
LIKE THE ONE LYING HERE.
 
I COULDN'T HELP WONDER
HOW MANY LAY ALONE,
ON A COLD CHRISTMAS EVE
IN A LAND FAR FROM HOME.
THE VERY THOUGHT
BROUGHT A TEAR TO MY EYE,
I DROPPED TO MY KNEES
AND STARTED TO CRY.
 
THE SOLDIER AWAKENED
AND I HEARD A ROUGH VOICE,
"SANTA DON'T CRY,
THIS LIFE IS MY CHOICE;
 
I FIGHT FOR FREEDOM,
I DON'T ASK FOR MORE,
MY LIFE IS MY GOD,
MY COUNTRY, MY CORPS."
 
THE SOLDIER ROLLED OVER
AND DRIFTED TO SLEEP,
I COULDN'T CONTROL IT,
I CONTINUED TO WEEP.
 
I KEPT WATCH FOR HOURS,
SO SILENT AND STILL
AND WE BOTH SHIVERED
FROM THE COLD NIGHT'S CHILL.
 
I DIDN'T WANT TO LEAVE
ON THAT COLD, DARK, NIGHT,
THIS GUARDIAN OF HONOR
SO WILLING TO FIGHT.
 
THEN THE SOLDIER ROLLED OVER,
WITH A VOICE SOFT AND PURE,
WHISPERED, "CARRY ON SANTA,
IT'S CHRISTMAS DAY, ALL IS SECURE."
 
ONE LOOK AT MY WATCH,
AND I KNEW HE WAS RIGHT.
"MERRY CHRISTMAS, MY FRIEND,
AND TO ALL A GOOD NIGHT."
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For my Garimpo and all my American friends here few my pics from Kosovo '99 here in Serbia dogs on street have more care from our goverment than we war veterans... Its a shame!

IMG_20200107_212024_142.JPG

IMG_20200107_211956_265.JPG

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These days i even survive b 52 stratofortress bombardment its been one expirience that man remmember for a life. From that day i know i am wery lucky man deff on one ear but still wery happy :-) 

PS for gun lovers riffle i am armed its Serbian M76 7,9mm x4 optics in combat situation under heavy mortar fire on me i have hits on 700 800m! One good riffle

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A great looking rifle you have there Sloba. I can't have a rifle or gun here in Brazil it's not allowed. 

I still have some in a small collection in the USA.

Take good care of that rifle and it will take care of you. 

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I dont have it dear Garimpo i just use it in war when i was military 99on Kosovo

There docunentary on youtube war stories of Pastrik you can wach it i am been in that battle under heavy fire

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