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AMERICAN WARRIORS-PAST AND PRESENT

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Would you be able to tell the difference?

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The next time you see or read a headline bashing police for shooting someone with a "Toy" or "Replica" gun, remember this picture. Indianapolis PD confiscated this "Toy" water gun during an arrest, after they realized that the suspect has hidden a Mossberg 12 GA shotgun inside it, and it was a fully functioning weapon disguised to fool police. The threat is real, all day, every day. Still want to come to work with us and show us how "Wrong" we're doing our jobs?! People are constantly trying to find better ways to kill us.

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A tough man indeed, most normal people would have died or come very close and gave up!!

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BUMPER STICKERS SEEN ON MILITARY BASES

“When in Doubt, Empty The Magazine”
“Sniper: You can run, but you’ll just die tired!”
“Machine Gunners: Accuracy By Volume”
“Except For Ending Slavery, Fascism, Nazism and Communism, WAR has Never Solved Anything.”
” U.S. Marines: Certified Counselors to the 72 Virgins Dating Club.”
" U.S. Air Force: Travel Agents To Allah”
“The Marine Corps: When It Absolutely, Positively Has To Be Destroyed Overnight”

“Death Smiles At Everyone:
Marines Smile Back”
“What Do I Feel When I Kill A Terrorist? A Little Recoil”
“Marines:
Providing Enemies of America an Opportunity To Die For their Country Since 1775″
“Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Anyone Who Threatens It”
“Happiness Is A Belt-Fed Weapon”
“It’s God’s Job to Forgive Bin Laden.
It was Our Job To Arrange The Meeting”.
“Artillery Brings Dignity to What Would Otherwise Be Just A Vulgar Brawl”
“One Shot, Twelve Kills:
U.S. Naval Gun Fire Support “
“My Kid Fought In Iraq So Your Kid Can Party In College”
“A Dead Enemy Is A Peaceful Enemy;
Blessed Be The Peacemakers”
“Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they made a difference in the world. The U.S. military doesn’t have that problem.”

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Food City is a Southern grocery store chain with headquarters in Bristol, Tennessee

This is their one-minute commercial. Not a word spoken and none is needed.

Very few commercials deserve to go viral. We think this one does.

https://www.youtube.com/embed/uoABty_zE00?rel=0

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Again, I want to thank all you Vets for your service and sacrifice ... I just discovered this amazing essay by General Mattis ... And I dedicate the post to all of you! Thank you! Ron

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Thanks Ron, He is certainly a Marine's Marine.......... I am proud to have volunteered for service to my country.

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Thank you Ron ... The General's words are true and pure as gold! Like Steve I am proud to have served first as a college student in ROTC and then as an officer in the USAF. I look back on those years with a great deal of passion and pride ... some of the best years of my then young life in the late 60's and throughout the 70's. Thanks again for your salute and especially for posting the General's words.

Mike F

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Volunteered while in high school and 17 years old. Boot camp was a breeze then shipped out to another country before turning 18.

My family had a long list of volunteeres, never a draftee in the bunch and I wasn't about to be the first.

Would jump at the chance to do it again.

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An airman being captured by Vietnamese in Truc Bach Lake, Hanoi in 1967. The airman is John McCain.

John%20McCain.jpg

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My father was a Korean war vet, my brother and I both volunteered for Viet Nam. As stated above, would do it again in a heartbeat.

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Thanks for the post Steve ... Those times were tough for anyone of us wearing the Uniform!

Mike F

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1/2 BOYS-1/2 MEN

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The average age of the military man is 19 years. He is a short haired, tight-muscled kid who, under normal circumstances is considered by society as half man, half boy. Not yet dry behind the ears, not old enough to buy a beer, but old enough to die for his country. He never really cared much for work and he would rather wax his own car than wash his father ' s, but he has never collected unemployment either.

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He's a recent High School graduate; he was probably an average student, pursued some form of sport activities, drives a ten year old jalopy, and has a steady girlfriend that either broke up with him when he left, or swears to be waiting when he returns from half a world away. He listens to rock and roll or hip-hop or rap or jazz or swing and a 155mm howitzer.

He is 10 or 15 pounds lighter now than when he was at home because he is working or fighting from before dawn to well after dusk. He has trouble spelling, thus letter writing is a pain for him, but he can field strip a rifle in 30 seconds and reassemble it in less time in the dark. He can recite to you the nomenclature of a machine gun or grenade launcher and use either one effectively if he must.

He digs foxholes and latrines and can apply first aid like a professional.

He can march until he is told to stop, or stop until he is told to march.

He obeys orders instantly and without hesitation, but he is not without spirit or individual dignity. He is self-sufficient.

He has two sets of fatigues: he washes one and wears the other. He keeps his canteens full and his feet dry.

He sometimes forgets to brush his teeth, but never to clean his rifle. He can cook his own meals, mend his own clothes, and fix his own hurts.

If you're thirsty, he'll share his water with you; if you are hungry, his food. He'll even split his ammunition with you in the midst of battle when you run low.

He has learned to use his hands like weapons and weapons like they were his hands.

He can save your life - or take it, because that is his job.

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He will often do twice the work of a civilian, draw half the pay, and still find ironic humor in it all.


He has seen more suffering and death than he should have in his short lifetime.

He has wept in public and in private, for friends who have fallen in combat and is unashamed.

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He feels every note of the National Anthem vibrate through his body while at rigid attention, while tempering the burning desire to' square-away' those around him who haven't bothered to stand, remove their hat, or even stop talking. In an odd twist, day in and day out, far from home, he defends their right to be disrespectful.

Just as did his Father, Grandfather, and Great-grandfather, he is paying the price for our freedom. Beardless or not, he is not a boy. He is the American Fighting Man that has kept this country free for over 200 years.

MORE BELOW

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men-boys5.jpg

He has asked nothing in return, except Our friendship and understanding. Remember him, always, for hehasearned our respect and admiration with his blood. And now we even have women over there in danger, doing their part in this tradition of going to War when our nation calls us to do so.

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As you go to bed tonight, remember this shot.A short lull, a little shade and a picture of loved ones in their helmets.

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Prayer wheel for our military.... Please don't break it Please send this on after a short prayer.

Prayer Wheel

'Lord, hold our troops in your loving hands. Protect them as they protect us.

Bless them and their families for the selfless acts they perform for us in our time of need. Amen.'

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When you receive this, please stop for a moment and say a prayer for our ground troops in Afghanistan , sailors on ships, and airmen in the air, and for those in Iraq , Afghanistan and all foreign countries.

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Of all the gifts you could give a US Soldier, Sailor, Coastguardsman, Marine, or Airman, prayer is the very best one.

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Old Guy and a Bucket of Shrimp

This is a wonderful story and it is true. You will be pleased

that you read it, and I believe you will pass it on. It is an important piece of American history.

It happened every Friday evening, almost without fail, when the sun resembled a giant orange and was starting to dip into the blue ocean.

Old Ed came strolling along the beach to his favorite pier.

Clutched in his bony hand was a bucket of shrimp. Ed walks out to the end Of the pier, where it seems he almost has the world to himself. The glow of the sun is a golden bronze now.

Everybody's gone, except for a few joggers on the beach. Standing out on the end of the pier, Ed is alone with his thoughts...and his bucket of shrimp.

Before long, however, he is no longer alone. Up in the sky a thousand white dots come screeching and squawking, winging their way toward that lanky frame standing there on the end of the pier.

Before long, dozens of seagulls have enveloped him, their wings fluttering and flapping wildly. Ed stands there tossing shrimp to the hungry birds. As he does, if you listen closely, you can hear him say with a smile, ‘Thank you. Thank you.'

In a few short minutes the bucket is empty. But Ed doesn’t leave. He stands there lost in thought, as though transported to another time and place.

When he finally turns around and begins to walk back toward the beach, a few of the birds hop along the pier with him until he gets to the stairs, and then they, too, fly away. And old Ed quietly makes his way down to the end of the beach and on home.

If you were sitting there on the pier with your fishing line in the water, Ed might seem like ‘a funny old duck,’ as my dad used to say. Or, to onlookers, he’s just another old codger, lost in his own weird world, feeding the seagulls with a bucket full of shrimp.To the onlooker, rituals can look either very strange or very empty. They can seem altogether unimportant …. maybe even a lot of nonsense.

Old folks often do strange things, at least in the eyes of Boomers and Busters. Most of them would probably write Old Ed off, down there in Florida … That's too bad. They’d do well to know him better.

CONTINUED

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His full name: Eddie Rickenbacker. He was a famous hero in World War I, and then he was in WWII. Have you ever heard of Eddie Rickenbacker? On one of his flying missions across the Pacific, he and his seven-member crew went down. Miraculously, all of the men survived, crawled out of their plane, and climbed into a life raft. Captain Rickenbacker and his crew floated for days on the rough waters of the Pacific. They fought the sun. They fought sharks. Most of all, they fought hunger and thirst. By the eighth day their rations ran out. No food. No water. They were hundreds of miles from land and no one knew where they were or even if they were alive. CONT:

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Every day across America millions wondered and prayed that Eddie Rickenbacker might somehow be found alive.The men adrift needed a miracle. That afternoon they had a simple devotional service and prayed for a miracle. They tried to nap. Eddie leaned back and pulled his military cap over his nose. Time dragged on. All he could hear was the slap of the waves against the raft…Suddenly, Eddie felt something land on the top of his cap. It was a seagull! Old Ed would later describe how he sat perfectly still, planning his next move. With a flash of his hand and a squawk from the gull, he managed to grab it and wring its neck. He tore the feathers off, and he and his starving crew made a meal of it - a very slight meal for eight men. Then they used the intestines for bait. With it, they caught fish, which gave them food and more bait . . . and the cycle continued. With that simple survival technique, they were able to endure the rigors of the sea until they were found and rescued after 24 days at sea. Eddie Rickenbacker lived many years beyond that ordeal, but he never forgot the sacrifice of that first life-saving seagull… And he never stopped saying, ‘Thank you.' That’s why almost every Friday night he would walk to the end of the pier with a bucket full of shrimp and a heart full of gratitude.

CONT:

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PS: Eddie Rickenbacker was the founder of Eastern Airlines. Before WWI he was race car driver. In WWI he was a pilot and became America ’s first ace. In WWII he was an instructor and military adviser, and he flew missions with the combat pilots. Eddie Rickenbacker is a true American hero. And now you know another story about the trials and sacrifices that brave men have endured for your freedom.

As you can see, I chose to pass it on. It is a great story that many don’t know…You’ve got to be careful with old guys, You just never know what they have done during their lifetime.

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Thanks for sharing that story....I knew about Eddie as a war hero, but never heard about the ordeal in the raft.

Most of us are way too quick to judge the older generations and their, sometimes, odd rituals. I never thought much about it until now, but my dad (WWII in submarine service) would do some strange things when sometimes entering or leaving a room. Now I think I can understand why..........thanks.

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