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AMERICAN WARRIORS-PAST AND PRESENT

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FOLKS, JUST A LITTLE ADDITION TO THIS....EGLIN AFB, AS IS STATED BELOW, IS WHERE THE RAIDERS PRACTICED.....AUXILIARY FIELD FIVE AT EGLIN, TO BE EXACT.....THEY PAINTED THE OUTLINE OF THE USS HORNET FLIGHT DECK ON THE ASPHALT RUNWAY AT THIS HISTORIC FIELD....THE OUTLINE OF THE FLIGHT DECK REMAINS TO THIS DAY, AND IS VISIBLE WHEN YOU

GO OVER TO THE TRAINING FIELD......THE ARMY RANGERS USE THE AREA FOR TRAINING TODAY....

A final toast for the Doolittle Raiders

It's the cup of brandy that no one wants to drink.

On Tuesday, in Fort Walton Beach, Florida, the surviving Doolittle Raiders will gather publicly for the last time.

They once were among the most universally admired and revered men in the United States. There were 80 of the Raiders in April 1942, when they carried out one of the most courageous and heart-stirring military operations in this nation's history. The mere mention of their unit's name, in those years, would bring tears to the eyes of grateful Americans.

Now only four survive.

After Japan's sneak attack on Pearl Harbor, left the United States reeling and wounded, something dramatic was needed to turn the war effort around.

Even though there were no friendly airfields close enough to Japan for the United States to launch a retaliation, a daring plan was devised. Sixteen

B-25’s were modified so that they could take off from the deck of an aircraft carrier. This had never before been tried -- sending such big, heavy bombers from a carrier.

The 16 five-man crews, under the command of Lt. Col. James Doolittle, who himself flew the lead plane off the USS Hornet, knew that they would not be able to return to the carrier. They would have to hit Japan, and then hope to make it to China for a safe landing.

But on the day of the raid, the Japanese military caught wind of the plan. The Raiders were told that they would have to take off from much farther out in the Pacific Ocean than they had counted on. They were told that because of this they would not have enough fuel to make it to safety.

And those men went anyway.

They bombed Tokyo, and then flew as far as they could. Four planes crash-landed; 11 more crews bailed out, and three of the Raiders died. Eight more were captured; three were executed. Another died of starvation in a Japanese prison camp. One crew made it to Russia .

The Doolittle Raid sent a message from the United States to its enemies, and to the rest of the world:

We will fight.

And, no matter what it takes, we will win.

Of the 80 Raiders, 62 survived the war. They were celebrated as national heroes, models of bravery. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer produced a motion picture based on the raid; "Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo," starring Spencer Tracy and Van Johnson, was a patriotic and emotional box-office hit, and the phrase became part of the national lexicon. In the movie-theater previews for the film, MGM proclaimed that it was presenting the story "with supreme pride."

Beginning in 1946, the surviving Raiders have held a reunion each April, to commemorate the mission. The reunion is in a different city each year. In 1959, the city of Tucson, Arizona, as a gesture of respect and gratitude, presented the Doolittle Raiders with a set of 80 silver goblets. Each goblet was engraved with the name of a Raider.

Every year, a wooden display case bearing all 80 goblets is transported to the reunion city. Each time a Raider passes away, his goblet is turned upside down in the case at the next reunion, as his old friends bear solemn witness.

Also in the wooden case is a bottle of 1896 Hennessy Very Special cognac. The year is not happenstance: 1896 was when Jimmy Doolittle was born.

There has always been a plan: When there are only two surviving Raiders, they would open the bottle, at last drink from it, and toast their comrades who preceded them in death.

As 2013 began, there were five living Raiders; then, in February, Tom Griffin passed away at age 96.

What a man he was. After bailing out of his plane over a mountainous Chinese forest after the Tokyo raid, he became ill with malaria, and almost died. When he recovered, he was sent to Europe to fly more combat missions. He was shot down, captured, and spent 22 months in a German prisoner of war camp.

The selflessness of these men, the sheer guts ... there was a passage in the Cincinnati Enquirer obituary for Mr. Griffin that, on the surface, had nothing to do with the war, but that emblematizes the depth of his sense of duty and devotion:

"When his wife became ill and needed to go into a nursing home, he visited her every day. He walked from his house to the nursing home, fed his wife and at the end of the day brought home her clothes. At night, he washed and ironed her clothes. Then he walked them up to her room the next morning. He did that for three years until her death in 2005."

So now, out of the original 80, only four Raiders remain: Dick Cole (Doolittle's co-pilot on the Tokyo raid), Robert Hite, Edward Saylor and David Thatcher. All are in their 90s. They have decided that there are too few of them for the public reunions to continue.

The events in Fort Walton Beach this week will mark the end. It has come full circle; Florida's nearby Eglin Field was where the Raiders trained in secrecy for the Tokyo mission.

The town is planning to do all it can to honor the men: a six-day celebration of their valor, including luncheons, a dinner, and a parade.

Do the men ever wonder if those of us, for whom they helped save the country, have tended to it in a way that is worthy of their sacrifice? They don't talk about that, at least not around other people. But if you find yourself near Fort Walton Beach this week, and if you should encounter any of the Raiders, you might want to offer them a word of thanks. I can tell you from firsthand observation that they appreciate hearing that they are remembered.

The men have decided that after this final public reunion they will wait until a later date -- some time this year -- to get together once more, informally and in absolute privacy. That is when they will open the bottle of brandy. The years are flowing by too swiftly now; they are not going to wait until there are only two of them.

They will fill the four remaining upturned goblets,

and raise them in a toast to those who are gone.

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A long day for these hero's......

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I would like to think America still produces young men like that.

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Klunker I was a volunteer when we had the draft......today no draft and all are volunteers....so in my opinion

all of the American military are hero's the moment they raise their hand and swear their allegiance to the USA....

We have many combat hero's today.....some we hear about....other just do their job and go about their

lives.....but all are hero's :yesss:

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America's oldest veteran to spend quiet Memorial Day at Texas home.....

RichardOverton.jpg

For his 107th Memorial Day, Richard Arvine Overton, who saw many of his fellow soldiers fall in the line of duty in World War II and even more die over the following decades, is planning a quiet day at the Texas home he built after returning home from World War II.

He wouldn’t want it any other way.

Overton, who is believed to be the nation's oldest veteran, told FoxNews.com he’ll likely spend the day on the porch of his East Austin home with a cigar nestled in his right hand, perhaps with a cup of whiskey-stiffened coffee nearby.

“I don’t know, some people might do something for me, but I’ll be glad just to sit down and rest,” the Army veteran said during a phone interview. “I’m no young man no more.”

Overton, who was born on May, 11, 1906, in Texas’ Bastrop County, has gotten used to being the center of attention of late. In addition to being formally recognized by Austin Mayor Lee Leffingwell on May 9, Overton traveled to Washington, D.C., on May 17 as part of Honor Flight, a nonprofit group that transports veterans free of charge to memorials dedicated to their service. Despite serving in the South Pacific from 1942 through 1945, including stops in Hawaii, Guam, Palau and Iwo Jima to name a few, it was Overton’s first time in the nation’s capital.

“I was really honored when I got there,” Overton said of his visit to the World War II Memorial. “There were so many people, it was up in the thousands. And we danced and we jumped … them people tickled me to death. It made me happy as can be.”

The entire experience gave Overton a “good thrill,” he said, and the significance of visiting the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial at a time when an African-American holds the country’s highest elected office was not lost him.

“I was very, very happy,” Overton continued, adding that he wasn’t deterred by Washington’s expansive National Mall. “At my age and my strength, I’m able to stand up and do anything. My mind is good, so I’m able to do what I want.”

Overton credits his longevity to aspirin, which he takes daily, and the relatively stress-free life he’s enjoyed since getting out of the service in October 1945. He then worked at local furniture stores before taking a position with the Texas Treasury Department in Austin. He married twice but never fathered any children and still attends church every Sunday.

“I got good health and I don’t take any medicine,” he said. “I also stay busy around the yards, I trim trees, help with the horses. The driveways get dirty, so I clean them. I do something to keep myself moving. I don’t watch television.”

Overton also passes his time with up to 12 cigars a day and a little whiskey in his morning coffee. The hooch helps keep Overton spry, he said.

“I may drink a little in the evening too with some soda water, but that’s it,” he said. “Whiskey’s a good medicine. It keeps your muscles tender.”

Overton’s secrets may be unorthodox to some, but it’s hard to argue with someone approaching supercentenarian status — an individual aged 110 or older. There are believed to be just 57 people worldwide that meet that classification, including 114-year-old Jeralean Talley, of Inkster, Mich., who is the oldest person in the United States according to the Gerontology Research Group. (Talley, who was born in 1899, reportedly celebrated her birthday on Thursday and passes her time listening to baseball on the radio and watching television.)

Among U.S. veterans, it’s extremely difficult — if not impossible — to confirm Overton’s place as the oldest living former soldier since just roughly 9 million of the nation’s 22 million vets are registered with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. But that didn’t stop the city of Austin from recognizing him as the oldest veteran in Texas during his birthday proclamation at City Hall. Mayor Leffingwell, in a statement to FoxNews.com, said Austin is “honored” to call Overton one of its own.

“I’ve spoken with Mr. Overton on a few different occasions, and admire his spirit for life and his country,” the statement read. “He is truly one of our unsung heroes and we are privileged that he calls Austin his home.”

Overton, for his part, believes he’s the oldest veteran in the country, although he said he feels decades younger and doesn’t really embrace the part. He wishes he could spend a few hours this Memorial Day reliving war stories with fellow veterans, but he’s outlived most — if not all — of them.

“I know I had someone from my platoon until recently, but he passed so now I don’t have anyone that I know,” he said. “So I feel lonesome by myself sometimes. I would love to ask some of them some questions, but nobody is here. Everybody’s passed.”

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/05/24/america-oldest-veteran-to-spend-quiet-memorial-day-at-texas-home/#ixzz2UFaXYbO5

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According to the website, this reunion was held 4/7/13 in Fort Walton.

It's the cup of brandy no one wants to drink.

On Tuesday, in Fort Walton Beach, Florida, the surviving Doolittle Raiders gathered publicly for the last time.

They once were among the most universally admired and revered men in the United States. There were 80 of the Raiders in April 1942, when they carried out one of the most courageous and heart-stirring military operations in this nation's history. The mere mention of their unit's name, in those years, would bring tears to the eyes of grateful Americans.

Now only four survive.

After Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, with the United States reeling and wounded, something dramatic was needed to turn the war effort around. Even though there were no friendly airfields close enough to Japan for the United States to launch a retaliation, a daring plan was devised. Sixteen B-25s were modified so that they could take off from the deck of an aircraft carrier. This had never been tried before -- sending big, heavy bombers from a carrier.

The 16 five-man crews, under the command of Lt. Col. James Doolittle, who himself flew the lead plane off the USS Hornet, knew that they would not be able to return to the carrier. They would have to hit Japan and then hope to make it to China for a safe landing.

But on the day of the raid, the Japanese navy caught sight of the carrier. The Raiders were told that they would have to take off from much farther out in the Pacific than they had counted on. They were told that because of this they would not have enough fuel to make it to safety.

And those men went anyway.

They bombed Tokyo, and then flew as far as they could. Four planes crash-landed; 11 more crews bailed out, and three of the Raiders died. Eight more were captured; three were executed. Another died of starvation in a Japanese prison camp. One crew made it to Russia.

The Doolittle Raid sent a message from the United States to its enemies, and to the rest of the world:
We will fight. And, no matter what it takes, we will win.

Of the 80 Raiders, 62 survived the war. They were celebrated as national heroes, models of bravery. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer produced a motion picture based on the raid; "Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo," starring Spencer Tracy and Van Johnson, was a patriotic and emotional box-office hit, and the phrase became part of the national lexicon. In the movie-theater previews for the film, MGM proclaimed that it was presenting the story "with supreme pride."

Beginning in 1946, the surviving Raiders have held a reunion each April, to commemorate the mission. The reunion is in a different city each year. In 1959, the city of Tucson, Arizona, as a gesture of respect and gratitude, presented the Doolittle Raiders with a set of 80 silver goblets. Each goblet was engraved with the name of a Raider.
Every year, a wooden display case bearing all 80 goblets is transported to the reunion city. Each time a Raider passes away, his goblet is turned upside down in the case at the next reunion, as his old friends bear solemn witness.

Also in the wooden case is a bottle of 1896 Hennessy Very Special cognac. The year is not happenstance: 1896 was when Jimmy Doolittle was born.
There has always been a plan: When there are only two surviving Raiders, they would open the bottle, at last drink from it, and toast their comrades who preceded them in death.

As 2013 began, there were five living Raiders; then, in February, Tom Griffin passed away at age 96.
What a man he was. After bailing out of his plane over a mountainous Chinese forest after the Tokyo raid, he became ill with malaria, and almost died. When he recovered, he was sent to Europe to fly more combat missions. He was shot down, captured, and spent 22 months in a German prisoner of war camp.

The selflessness of these men ... there was a passage in the Cincinnati Enquirer obituary for Mr. Griffin that, on the surface, had nothing to do with the war, but that captures the depth of his sense of duty and devotion:
"When his wife became ill and needed to go into a nursing home, he visited her every day. He walked from his house to the nursing home, fed his wife and at the end of the day brought home her clothes. At night, he washed and ironed her clothes. Then he walked them up to her room the next morning. He did that for three years until her death in 2005."

So now, out of the original 80, only four Raiders remain: Dick Cole (Doolittle's co-pilot on the Tokyo raid), Robert Hite, Edward Saylor and David Thatcher. All are in their 90s. They have decided that there are too few of them for the public reunions to continue.

The events in Fort Walton Beach this week will mark the end. It has come full circle; Florida's nearby Eglin Field was where the Raiders trained in secrecy for the Tokyo mission.
The town is planning to do all it can to honor the men: a six-day celebration of their valor, including luncheons, a dinner and a parade.

Do the men ever wonder if those of us for whom they helped save the country have tended to it in a way that is worthy of their sacrifice? They don't talk about that, at least not around other people. But if you find yourself near Fort Walton Beach this week, and if you should encounter any of the Raiders, you might want to offer them a word of thanks. I can tell you from firsthand observation that they appreciate hearing that they are remembered.

The men have decided that after this final public reunion they will wait until a later date -- some time this year -- to get together once more, informally and in absolute privacy. That is when they will open the bottle of brandy. The years are flowing by too swiftly now; they are not going to wait until there are only two of them.

They will fill the four remaining upturned goblets.
And raise them in a toast to those who are gone.

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Happy Birthday

post-1252-0-52485100-1371233479_thumb.jp

Edited by El Dorado

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Read Below Description of the Operation
red%20logo.jpg DeltaOneFiveUSMC Saepe Expertus, Semper Fidelis, Fratres Aeterni
header_bottom_bar_grad.png
April - 4 May 1966 – Operation OSAGE. Phu Loc – Bach Ma (I Corps).
Map Bullet #2 Back to I Corps Map
Operation Overview: On 27 April 1966, the Marines of 1/5 departed the USS Princeton once again, having been committed to another search and destroy mission called Operation OSAGE. Although the mission was the same as that of Operation JACKSTAY (search and destroy), the terrain could not have been more different. This time the steep, mountainous jungles of I Corps would challenge them.
The Marines of 1/5 were heli-lifted to LZ Crow, which was situated at the top of a mountain called (Nui) Bach Ma, one of the dominant mountains located north of the Hai Van Pass, south of Phu Bai, in the Phu Loc District (Quan Phu Loc). There was an old French compound atop Bach Ma, complete with a swimming pool and a cluster of very substantial buildings. After the Marines of 1/5 landed on the top of the mountain, they worked their way eastward, down toward the coast, searching for the elusive Viet Cong.
Seven Marines in Charlie Company, 1/5, were killed on 29 April 1966 during Operation OSAGE at the hands of a command-detonated bomb that had been hidden by the Viet Cong in a drinking hole. That date would be remembered as one of the deadliest single days for Charlie Company, 1 st Battalion, 5 th Marines during the entire Vietnam War. There would be many such bloody days in the long years to come for the Marines who served with 1/5, but none would be more shattering than the day the VC set off that horrible command-detonated bomb, instantly transforming a peaceful, idyllic place into a Dante-esque scene from hell.
Despite this terrible incident, Operation OSAGE was considered to be a significant success by Marine Corps operational planners.

---


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Ring.jpg

Aug. 16, 2013: This photo in Raleigh, N.C. shows a pair of gold aviator rings - a replica, right, of the original ring at left, that belonged to U.S. Army Air Corps 2nd Lt. David C. Cox who traded the ring for a couple of chocolate bars while he was imprisoned in a German prisoner of war camp during World War II. The ring was returned to Cox's son David Jr. by a German couple with some investigative help from an American neighbor. Upon his return from the war, one of the first things Cox had done was to have an exact duplicate made of his prized ring - right down to the inscription. When he died in 1994, he passed the replica to his son, David Jr., who wore it until it finally broke in the middle. (AP)

Ring-B.jpg

Aug. 16, 2013: This photo taken in Raleigh, N.C., shows memorabilia from U.S. Army Air Corps 2nd Lt. David C. Cox's military service during World War II including his portrait and members of his B-17 crew. Lt. Cox traded his gold aviator ring for a couple of chocolate bars while he was imprisoned in a German prisoner of war camp. The ring was returned to Cox's son David Cox Jr. by a German couple through some investigative help from an American neighbo

RALEIGH, N.C. – After a year and a half behind barbed wire as a prisoner in World War II, 2nd Lt. David C. Cox had just about reached his breaking point.

Deliveries of Red Cross parcels to Stalag VII-A had all but ceased, and the U.S. Army bomber co-pilot and his fellow POWs were subsisting on scanty rations of bug-infested soup and bread. Outside the wire, Adolf Hitler's forces showed no signs of giving up.

Cold and hungry, the North Carolinian made a difficult decision. He slipped the gold aviator's ring — a gift from his parents — off his finger and passed it through a fence to an Italian POW, who handed back a couple of chocolate bars.

He would never again see the ring. But it did not disappear.

Last week, about a dozen family members and friends gathered in the living room of David C. Cox Jr.'s Raleigh home and watched as he slit open a small yellow parcel from Germany. The 67-year-old son dug through the crinkly packing material and carefully removed a little plastic box.

"And here it is," he said with a long sigh as he pulled out the ring. "Oh, my goodness. ... I never thought it would ever happen. I thought it was gone. We all thought it was gone.

"He thought it was gone," he said of his late father.

The story of how the ring made it back to the Cox family is a testament to a former enemy's generosity, the reach of the Internet and the healing power of time.

Following the December 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the elder Cox left college and enlisted. The Army Air Corps accepted him on his second application.

He graduated from flight school on July 26, 1942. That same day, he married his high school sweetheart, Hilda Walker.

To celebrate his commission, Irvin and Connie Bell Cox presented their middle son with a gold signet ring, the oval emblazoned with a raised propeller and wings. Engraved inside were the words, "Mother & Father to David C. Cox Greensboro, NC," and the numbers 10-4-18-42 — his birthday and the current year.

Cox was assigned to the 305th Bomb Group, 364th Squadron — part of the "Mighty Eighth" Air Force. By October, he was in England.

As a co-pilot in the B-17 "Flying Fortress," Cox flew more than a dozen bombing missions over occupied France and the German heartland. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for helping to get his burning plane back to England from a May 1943 raid that cost the lives of half his 10-man crew.

On July 28, 1943, Cox's plane was shot down over Kassel, Germany. He parachuted into a rose garden, was taken prisoner, interrogated and then shipped to Stalag Luft III, the POW camp made famous in the Steve McQueen film, "The Great Escape."

He remained there until January 1945, when he and the other Allied officers were force-marched three days through the snow, then packed into train cars for another three days before ending up at Stalag VII-A near Moosburg, northeast of Munich.

As Hitler's Third Reich collapsed upon itself, POWs from all over found their way to Moosburg. By the time Cox arrived, conditions there went from bad to what one historian described as "barely correct by the standards of the Geneva Convention."

It was at Moosburg that he traded the ring for the candy bars.

Finally, on April 28, 1945, Gen. George Patton's 14th Armored Division liberated the camp, and Cox, who was promoted to 1st lieutenant, made his way back to North Carolina. He started a tire retreading equipment company with his brother, and he and Hilda raised three children.

Cox didn't talk much about the war, except to remind his children of his privations when they refused to clean their plates. And he spoke wistfully about his lost ring.

Upon his return from the war, one of the first things Cox did was to have an exact duplicate made of his prized ring — right down to the inscription. When he died in 1994, the replica passed to his son, David Jr., who wore it until it finally broke in the middle.

Now fast-forward to today and the tiny Bavarian village of Hohenberg, a picturesque collection of stucco and half-timbered houses.

Mark and Mindy Turner moved there about a year ago so he could take a job as an air traffic controller at the nearby U.S. Army installation in Ansbach. Earlier this month, the couple accepted a dinner invitation from their neighbors, Martin and Regina Kiss.

A 64-year-old master church painter by trade, Martin Kiss is also a skilled artist, and after dinner he showed his visitors around his studio. Then he mentioned he had something else he'd like them to see.

Kiss disappeared into the living room and returned with a gold ring — then told a story.

The Kiss family was Hungarian — the name is pronounced "KISH" — and comes from an area in the northern part of present-day Serbia. They ran a small pub near the Danube River.

A Russian soldier on his way home after the war traded the ring to the family — presumably in exchange for room and board, Kiss' grandmother told him. His "Oma" gave it to him when he moved to Germany in 1971 — for luck, or in case he needed some quick cash.

Kiss wore it proudly on his pinkie. He realized it must have come from an American soldier, but didn't know how to trace its owner — especially in a new country that wasn't all that eager to talk about the war.

Worried it might get damaged as he worked, Kiss placed the ring in a corked glass bottle with an old coin and a gold chain.

Still, he never stopped thinking about the original owner — and now, with two computer-savvy Americans in his home, he decided it was time to try and find him.

Mark Turner went online when he got back home. Within 20 minutes, he'd hit pay dirt.

He found a 2005 master's thesis from North Carolina State University. One focus of Norwood McDowell's 219-page paper was the war diary of his wife's grandfather, David C. Cox Sr. — the name on the ring's inscription.

And there, on page 179, was the anecdote about the chocolate bars. After all those years, this epic ring cycle had ended within a two-hour drive of where it began.

"It just seemed like it couldn't be true," says Turner.

Turner emailed McDowell a photograph of the ring and its inscription.

"That's it for sure," an ecstatic David Cox replied when McDowell forwarded the picture.

"Well, praise the Lord!" Mindy Turner wrote back. "We are so excited for your family!"

After a few more emails and phone calls, the ring was on its way to the United States.

Cradling it in his hand after opening the package Friday, the pilot's son was struck by the original's condition, compared to its replacement. His sister, Joy Wagner, walked over and took the ring in her hands.

"Gosh, it's beautiful," she said as tears welled in her eyes. "Oh, that's so special."

David Cox said holding the ring gave him goose bumps.

"I feel his presence," he said of his father. "I wish he was here."

Kiss — whose own grandfather spent several years in a Soviet camp during and after the war — said in a phone interview with The Associated Press that his only regret is that David Cox Sr. and his grandmother weren't alive to share the "happy ending."

Refusing to accept even reimbursement for the shipping, he added, "You know the old saying: 'It's better to give than to receive.'"


Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/08/19/american-world-war-ii-pow-prized-gold-ring-comes-home-after-70-year-journey/#ixzz2cQs7jvgE

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Vietnam veteran reunited with long-lost dog tags

VetMartinson.jpg

Lanny Martinson left a lot in Vietnam: parts of himself, both physical and emotional.

The U.S. Marine Corps veteran lost his right leg in a minefield outside Khe Sanh in 1968. He relinquished his youth in that field, struggling with post-traumatic stress disorder and survivor’s guilt.

In June, his 45-year-long healing process took another, giant step forward.

Thanks to a cadre of Good Samaritans, and notably an Australian citizen, the Texas resident has regained something very important to him: his once long-lost dog tags.

“Overwhelming,” Martinson told The San Diego Union-Tribune, of the remarkable recovery of the lost tags and their reunion in June with their rightful owner after more than 40 years. “It’s like I left a part of me over there and somehow it’s made its way back to me from a dark place.”

“I can’t tell you how much this means to me.”

- Lanny Martinson

The story dates to June 1968, reports the Lake County News Chronicleexternal-link.png of Two Harbors, Minn., when a 24-year-old Martinson lost his leg – and tags – in the Khe Sanh minefield, where six others lost their lives.

“I just figured they’d gotten rid of them when they ripped off my clothes to operate on me,” Martinson reportedly said.

Afterwards, the Sugar Land, Texas, resident, who originally hails from Two Harbors, returned home to retrofit his broken body and psyche.

“A lot of guys, when they come back, they’re trying to replace that feeling and it takes a while to get over that,” he told The News Chronicle. “You need to talk about it. It kind of scares you. (I advise vets to) sit down and write about it. Expect to have tears running down your face, but just do it. It will do you good.”

In 2011, Martinson reportedly completed “After the Rush,” a still-unpublished book about his combat experiences.

It was also in 2011, the Union-Tribune reports, when John Naismith, an Australian who teaches English as a Second Language to Vietnamese youth, stumbled upon Martinson’s long-lost dog tags while trekking through the Southeast Asian nation’s brush.

Naismith reportedly could not find Martinson’s name among the rolls of those killed during the conflict.

Eventually the Aussie gave the tags to Charlie Fagan, a friend who, according to the Union-Tribune, owns Good Time Charlie’s, a California motorcycle shop.

Fagan contacted a Vietnam vet concerning the tags, and soon Tanna Toney-Ferris, who lives in the San Diego suburb of Chula Vista, learned of the predicament.

“Everybody’s put on this earth for a reason,” the 54-year-old self-described housewife told the Union-Tribune. “I guess this is mine.”

Toney-Ferris reportedly wrote of the tags on numerous veterans’ websites and sent a friend request to a Vietnam vet Facebook page, where the administrator, Floridian Bob “Sparky" Sparks saw it.

“We gotta do this,” Sparks said, according to the Union-Tribune.

In June, Sparks posted about the long-lost tags on a Marine network claiming some 550,000 members. Eventually, one member located Martinson and phoned. Another messaged him through Facebook.

“I can’t tell you how much this means to me,” Martinson reportedly wrote in an email to Sparks. “It brings it all back again; the men I lost, whose names are on the Wall, and the wounded that are now like me. I am trying to write this with tears running down my cheeks.”

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/08/25/vietnam-veteran-reunited-with-long-lost-dog-tags/#ixzz2d0fdSYMT

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World War II veteran takes ride in same B-25 bomber decades later

MarvinRussell.jpg

A Missouri World War II veteran who flew 18 missions in B-25 bombers was recently given the opportunity to take off on his 19th flight in the vintage aircraft -- this time as a passenger.

Marvin "Rusty" Russell, a former tail gunner in the US Army Air Forces, flew aboard a restored B-25 for the first time in nearly 70 years Thursday at Springfield-Branson National Airport, KY3.com reported.

Russell, 88, told the station he could not pass up the opportunity to see the historic bomber, which is maintained by the Commemorative Air Force Arizona Wing Museum in Mesa, Ariz.

"I saw the picture, and, when they said it was based in Corsica, I said, 'Well, it's got to be one of four squadrons.' And I came out here, and come to find out it was in my squadron," Russell said.

Officials with the Commemorative Air Force Arizona Wing Museum came across Russell's military records while attempting to locate members of the twin-engine bomber's original crew.

"We were going through the records and sure enough, two missions on number 18, Maid in the Shade. What a thrill, what a thrill," said Russ Gilmore, a fight operation officer with the museum.

The plane flew 15 combat missions over Italy between Nov. 4 and Dec. 31, 1944. The majority of the targets were railroad bridges, according to the museum's website.

"We got Rusty up in the back of the plane, into the tail gunner position, and Rusty had just a little bit of a tear in his eye," Gilmore said.

Russell, who flew two missions in the same B-25 in November, 1944, told KY3.com the flight brought back memories of his experiences in the aircraft, which he considered his "office."

"It was so much smaller back there than what I remembered. I laid it to blame on age that it's hard to get around in there," Russell told the station.

The restored B-25 will be on display in Springfield's until Sept. 16. The Commemorative Air Force Arizona Wing Museum has upcoming displays in Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas.


Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/09/14/world-war-ii-veteran-takes-ride-in-same-b-25-bomber-decades-later/#ixzz2erV9HxKR

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HOOYA

post-1252-0-59087200-1379777095_thumb.jp

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Hey Guys … How did I miss this over this past Memorial Day? Was it in the news locally in CO … because that is where I was when it happened? Or just locally in CA? It must have been one hell of a party for those 200 who came back to the Nixon Foundation Reunion after 40 years. I vaguely remember the dinner put on by Nixon … Not much news covering it then either. Nixon may have bungled a few things … Watergate being the biggest … BUT he got it right with the POW’s! If you didn’t see this before sit back and enjoy.

Mike

40 yr anniv POW

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Don ... Thanks for posting that. Mike F

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Lt. Col Matthew Dooley Fired



This needs to keep going. If you don't believe it happened, just Google his name.

Our nation is under fire… thanks to the current administration. Did you see or hear this in the news?

Lt. Col Matthew Dooley, a West Point graduate and highly-decorated combat veteran, was an instructor at the Joint Forces Staff College at the National Defense University. He had 19 years of service and experience, and was considered one of the most highly qualified military instructors on Radical Islam & Terrorism.

He taught military students about the situations they would encounter, how to react, about Islamic culture, traditions, and explained the mindset of Islamic extremists. Passing down first hand knowledge and experience, and teaching courses that were suggested (and approved) by the the Joint Forces Staff College. The course "Perspectives on Islam and Islamic Radicalism" - which was suggested and approved by the Joint Forces Staff College - caught the attention of several Islamic Groups, and they wanted to make an example of him.

They collectively wrote a letter expressing their outrage, and the Pro-Islamic Obama Administration was all too happy to assist. The letter was passed to Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Martin Dempsey. Dempsey publicly degraded and reprimanded Dooley, and Dooley received a negative Officer Evaluation Report almost immediately (which he had aced for the past 5 years). He was relieved of teaching duties, and his career has been red-flagged.

He had a brilliant career ahead of him. Now, he has been flagged.

Richard Thompson, Thomas More Law Center

"All US Military Combatant Commands, Services, the National Guard Bureau, and Joint Chiefs are under Dempsey's Muslim Brotherhood-dictated order to ensure that henceforth, no US military course will ever again teach truth about Islam that the jihadist enemy finds offensive, or just too informative."

Former CIA agent Claire M. Lopez (about Lt. Col Dooley)

The Obama Administration has demonstrated lightning speed to dismiss Military brass that does not conform to its agenda, and not surprisingly, nobody is speaking up for Lt. Col. Dooley.

IT'S A SAD DAY FOR THIS COUNTRY WHEN GOOD LOYAL MEN LIKE THIS GET THROWN UNDER THE BUS BECAUSE NOBODY HAS THE COURAGE TO STAND UP!


Share this if you would. Lets bring some attention to this.

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GREAT STUFF About an amazing Spitfire Pilot in WWII. you just have to watch it, it's excellent & factual...
Spitfire Pilot in WWII
This is one of the best email I've had in a long time. Just watch the expression on his face as he watches himself. We owe a BIG thank you to men like him. Spitfire 944

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Finally got home to normal internet service and viewed this......it is very cool..... The look in his eyes when he saw the film was fantastic

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That was spectacular!!! :thumbsupanim:thumbsupanim :thumbsupanim

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VETERANS DAY 2013

Peace is predicated upon the good will, good nature, and general goodness of mankind. Thus, war and conflict have been used to settle what goodness alone could not. Our history as a nation is replete with conflict; it established our righteous beginnings and divided our civil discourse. In the face of these conflicts, there have always been men and women ready to answer their nation's call. They have inspired us with their sacrifice, honored us with their dedication, and humbled us with their unfathomable courage.

On the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month of 1918, hostilities in World War I ended with the hope that the world could find peace. While that peace was short-lived, Americans' respect and support for their uniformed veterans was not. Known around the world as Armistice Day for some, Remembrance Day for others, the 11th day of November is set aside to honor all those who have honored us with their service.

NRA Life of Duty commends our nation's veterans who have selflessly given more than anyone could ask of them. We salute you.

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