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A Word to the Wise on nickel testing stonies


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I had previously nickel tested some "maybe" meteorites around Christmas and did not get the pink color and set them a side. BUT a few of them haunted me because they had every indication of a stony meteorite yet tested negative for nickel. I kept them because they still could be a rare lunar or other breccia that did not include nickel. Well I was reading "The art of collecting meteorites" and he talks about crushing the Stony's to a fine powder with a mortar and pestle. In my previous testing, I had just used a hammer on my garage slab, chunky powder was the finest I achieved. Well I just tried it again with three of my maybes, this time with a mortar and pestle, and so far, two of the three that previously tested negative, came up positive for nickel content :laught16: Just thought I would mention this as I would have always considered those two meteorites as just plain old rocks. Live and learn, I guess.

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Hi Digitrich

The test chemical is virtually worthless :Huh_anim]: . Might as well use a dowsing rod :confused0013: !! No universities or labs use it there are way to many variables and all scrap iron has PPB of nickle in thier makeup :grrr01: . Usually causing a reaction with nickle contents less than 1%. I should think Iron ores, hemitite,magnatite as well contain a few PPBs. PPB is parts per billion. Happy Huntin John B.

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Hi Digitrich

The test chemical is virtually worthless :Huh_anim]: . Might as well use a dowsing rod :confused0013: !! No universities or labs use it there are way to many variables and all scrap iron has PPB of nickle in thier makeup :grrr01: . Usually causing a reaction with nickle contents less than 1%. I should think Iron ores, hemitite,magnatite as well contain a few PPBs. PPB is parts per billion. Happy Huntin John B.

:confused0013:

Then Richard Norton doesn't know what he's talking about?? I now have read in every meteorite book I have that nickel in terrestrial rocks is almost non existent and now your telling me the exact opposite... Now I am truly confused here, any help would definitely be appreciated.

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John B is right on the mark about the nickel thing.

Just because a chunk of rock,iron ,or slag has nickle,doesn't

make it a meteorite. Lots of steel and other metals are mixed

with nickle as an alloy. I have had nickle show up on mineral

assays ,from mining claims in the host rock.

I know of one dike in the Jicarilla Mining district in New Mexico

that shows a fair amount of nickle,but not enough to mine.

Just so you can see for your self I will attach a little extra information.Sci.htm

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Hi Guys-

While I may not know much about meteorites - I do have a good background in chemistry. Like John B stated- those home testing kits for nickel are absolutlely worthless. They can detect the presence of nickel if done correctly but they can't tell you the % in the sample. About the only way to get good results is to send the sample out to a lab for spectrographic analysis. They will send you back an anaylsis showing all the elements and the % of each...

Steve

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Guys,

Thanks for the info. It wasn't that I didn't believe John, it's just that there goes my definitive way of testing these myself, which really sucks hard with tulips. :angry-smiley-010:

I knew there were lots of man made materials that could have trace nickel, I thought nickel however was rare in terrestrial rocks and did not realize it was all that common. I wish that they had mentioned that in their meteorite books a little more clearly, which they don't, and it doesn't seem to make sense to me. BTW, I am not testing with some home testing kit, I am using a dimegloxemine(sp?) solution. I have noticed different speeds of the reaction and also brighter comparative results from one rock to the next maybe indicating a higher nickel percentage. Wonder if there wasn't a way of testing a known measured nickel source, say three different samples at different known percentages and thereby be able to calculate percentages on that in correlation. So my real question is this.....Is it normal to have small flakes of nickel in the average terrestrial rock?? And if so, how common is that, is it rare, extremely rare, or pretty common?

just trying to learn :hmmmmmm:

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Guys,

Thanks for the info. It wasn't that I didn't believe John, it's just that there goes my definitive way of testing these myself, which really sucks hard with tulips. :angry-smiley-010:

I knew there were lots of man made materials that could have trace nickel, I thought nickel however was rare in terrestrial rocks and did not realize it was all that common. I wish that they had mentioned that in their meteorite books a little more clearly, which they don't, and it doesn't seem to make sense to me. BTW, I am not testing with some home testing kit, I am using a dimegloxemine(sp?) solution. I have noticed different speeds of the reaction and also brighter comparative results from one rock to the next maybe indicating a higher nickel percentage. Wonder if there wasn't a way of testing a known measured nickel source, say three different samples at different known percentages and thereby be able to calculate percentages on that in correlation. So my real question is this.....Is it normal to have small flakes of nickel in the average terrestrial rock?? And if so, how common is that, is it rare, extremely rare, or pretty common?

just trying to learn :hmmmmmm:

Actually, let me add one more question....how often is there a lack of detectable nickel in stony's ? As I have several maybes that just scream meteorite but test negative with the Dime...ime?

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You should look for beads of metal for a dead givaway

or file it and look for a chondrule.

That would be much more effective and an easy way to come to

a conclusion of terestrial or not.

[Erik]

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You should look for beads of metal for a dead givaway

or file it and look for a chondrule.

That would be much more effective and an easy way to come to

a conclusion of terestrial or not.

[Erik]

Erik,

When you say "beads" of metal, the sides of those beads should be square or angular not round, correct? Or is it normal for the flecks to have rounded edges?

I seem to find lots of chondrules in about every rock I cut, so I kind of discount them a bit. One major problem I have is the micah or fieldspar showing little shiny flecks that aren't really metal and they shine even more under a lighted microscope making them even more misleading. I wish my eyes were as good as they were ten years ago.

Joe

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Mica and feldspar are thin and planar, the metal beads are round. and have well defined edges where as feldspar and micah do not.

Go to google and type in "monnig meteorite gallery" and view the cut stones in the collection to get

really familiar with condrules so that you can tell the difference between terrestrial inclusions and chondrules.

[Erik]

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