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Texas Meteorite found!


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Rubin:

Lets hope there is more out there. :bowdown:

I used to live in Austin (went to University of Texas); after you find the main mass, check out Austin - it's a wonderful city with the best live music. :1153:

Good job to Mike for getting there so quickly and getting things started.

Greg

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Hi Ruben,

I hope you have to shovel the meteorites into your truck.

Ben

Hi all,

There are very few meteorites out here, but never fear I won't come home empty handed! Very exciting to have first heard about this fall on the radio and then go out and find one. I'm here with Sonny, Mike Miller, and Del will join us today. I'll have a full report when I return next week.

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Aloha Ruben,

Good luck to you ALL in Texas. Have fun and be safe out there.

Aloha,

Stan aka Kaimi

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Oh, the joys of being rich, single (for some) and have few responsibilities... :laught16: :fighting0030: I guess I can only dream of that day. Hope you guys find at least one or two, Good Luck and be safe. Jason :;):

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Oh, the joys of being rich, single (for some) and have few responsibilities... :laught16: :fighting0030: I guess I can only dream of that day. Hope you guys find at least one or two, Good Luck and be safe. Jason :;):

Thanks guys!

Sonny, Mike and I found several beautiful stones.. Del came up short for most of the day but finally found one so he'll be very happy tonight!!

There are not too many stones out here and I'm afraid that without experienced hunters helping, Del may not have found one.

I'll have a story and video on my site by next week (I hope)

Ruben Garcia

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Glad to hear that you all scored some of the Texas fall hope to see pics soon.

Thanks guys!

Sonny, Mike and I found several beautiful stones.. Del came up short for most of the day but finally found one so he'll be very happy tonight!!

There are not too many stones out here and I'm afraid that without experienced hunters helping, Del may not have found one.

I'll have a story and video on my site by next week (I hope)

Ruben Garcia

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thats great news Ruben!

I'm not surprised you guys found stones!

stay safe out there..

Hi all,

Del scored more today as he's gotten better at Identifying these stones. I had my best day today and nearly tripled what I had yesterday. I have one more full day of hunting before I start the long 19 hour drive back to Phoenix. Unless of course we really start finding bucket loads then I'll stay a while longer.

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Texas Meteorite Has Been ID'd

Amateur astronomer finds meteorites near Waco

Updated: 2/22/2009 7:08 PM

By: Veronica Castelo

Now there's proof that what many saw fly through the sky was a meteorite.

It's hard to forget the image of a fireball in the sky caught on tape in broad daylight during last Sunday's Austin Marathon. Speculation ended as to what the fireball really was when experts determined that it was a meteor.

Now there's actual physical proof that it was a meteor. Amateur astronomer Doug Dawn and his team say they were able to find meteorites. Dawn's team analyzed the video footage shot by News 8 photographer Eddie Garcia. Dawn said there was a lot of information available in the film and it helped with calculations of where the material was coming from.

Rob Matson is an expert in Los Angeles who helped narrow the likely location of the meteorite's landfall. Dawn and his team already had radar data and immediately made their way out to the countryside in the Waco area.

The main mass was not found. With the help of area residents who reported observing the fall, the team immediately recognized and collected multiple tiny blackened, fusion crusted meteorite fragments.

"The Texas sized hospitality, tolerance, and enthusiastic cooperation of the landowners was greatly appreciated by the search team," Dawn said.

Two days after the fall, the team sent their findings to Los Angeles to Alan Rubin, Ph.D. at UCLA, a meteorite classification scientist. Classification is very important because until an approved, official meteoritical scientist approves a meteorite, it's not official. Chemical analysis was conducted on the meteorite to further confirm its identification.

Rubin said fresh meteorites have distinct characteristics, such as being all black, as long as it's not cracked. Once it's cracked, the inside is typically a light, gray metal flex, called the matrix. Dr. Rubin determined that it was an ordinary chondrite, also known as a Type L6.

L6's are one of the most common types of meteorites that fall, and possibly are originally from asteroid (8)Flora, a large asteroid whose orbit lies between Mars and Jupiter's, though scientists are still working out the details of origin.

"The entire experience was as incredibly exciting as it was incredibly humbling, to think, that hours earlier these meteorites were part of a tiny asteroid, called a meteoroid, floating in the heavens," Dawn said. "This is the stuff that dreams are made of, for an amateur astronomer, to actually reach out and touch a piece of heaven that we admire so much in our telescopes, and to contribute importantly to science by recovering it and providing it for analysis. It shows us our small place in the universe."

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