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New forum member with questions.


lvlagnum

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Hello everyone. I am a new member to this forum and I have a few questions to ask. Before I do that, I would like to thank the owner and moderators for creating and maintaining this forum. I wish to also thank the other members for the information, photos and stories which have kept me both amazed and entertained over the past month that I have been lurking here. I have been on the internet for ten years now and of all the forums that I have encountered and still frequent, this is the first one that has enticed me to join and post on it. I have to admit that before I found this forum, I had no idea that people were hunting for gold, meteorites and other things with metal detectors. I will post my questions in this section of the forum but I would invite anyone who frequents the other areas to reply as well, if they wish. My questions are as follows:

1. I understand from reading your posts that both skill and some degree of luck is required to find gold and or meteorites but is it possible for a skilled "Nugget Shooter" who who is out with his or her detector for say thirty-five or fourty hours a week, to make a reasonable living from this "hobby"?

2. I am from Canada and unfortunately my part of "The Great White North" which is near Buffalo, New York doesn't have much in the way of suitable areas to nugget shoot in but does anyone know if there are any other Canucks who frequent this forum or any sources of information for us Canadians who wish to learn more?

3. I have been thinking of vacationing in the southwest United States for many years and I'm now wondering if there are any laws or restrictions about visitors like me nugget shooting and or meteorite hunting while there?

4. I'm not sure yet what the laws or regulations are in Canada yet but does it require a prospector's license or other permit to nugget shoot with a detector?

5. I know that trespassing on private land is out of the question without permission from the owner but where else are you or are you not permitted to nugget shot and meteorite hunt?

I want to thank you in advance for any and all replies to my questions. I will look forward to reading your answers.

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Hi Ivlagnum ??

I'm not to sure of the laws of canadian metal detecting, I've seen articles of others that do but am still uncertain of permits or land status issues in your country. I'm told that in Canada all meteorite finds belong to the government. But if there is alot of a given material export and collecting and holding permits may be issued. I have also seen some fantastic gold nugget and hardrock finds from the red lake ontario area. Most are from major mining concerns but there may be placers in the vicinity. I'm surprised that other Canadians ain't jumped in to answer some of your questions ?? As far as Canadians visiting the SW ern US what the heck why not , stand in line with the all the illegal mexicans and we probobly wouldn't notice a canuck ot 2 !! Happy Huntin John B.

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Hi all!

Name is Charles

Just moved to Az from Hawaii. :hmmmmmm:

I'm in Phx and would like to learn more about this wonderful hobby.

Anyone have time or want to teach a green horn? I have a thirst for knownledge. Pointer and all advise accepted.

I have lots of time on my hands to explore Az.

Thank you

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Hello John B

Thank you for the welcome and the tip about Red Lake. I am slowly but surely reasearching the laws and regulations, such as they are, on nugget shooting and meteorite hunting in Canada. I would of course like to hear from other Canadians on the matter but untill then I would like to know more about the current situation in the United States, especialy the southwest. I know that there are hardrock gold mines several hours to the north of me but I'm not sure if that area has conditions suitable for searching with a detector. I'm thinking that British Columbia and or the Yukon might be a better bet for me. Unfortunately, our searching season is a lot shorter than yours because of our much harsher weather. But I guess that will just give me more time to learn before heading afield.

I seem to remember reading a news article about the recent meteorite fall out in western Canada mentioning that any any space rocks discovered after a certain date were not allowed to be exported without a permit. I think it also said that any meteorites found on private property belong to the property owner and those discovered on public land belong to the finder except in the province of Quebec where the finder gets to keep his prize no matter where it is situated. I'm not sure if any or all of that is true yet. I'll post something when I find out.

In the mean time, I would like to hear from some Americans about the situation down in the United States. I've read in some of the other posts that there is a lot of uncertainty about proposed changes in your land use regulations. If there is anyone who can answer my original questions, please do. I'm sure it will be interesting to compare the guidelines about nugget shooting and meteorite hunting on different types of public lands. I will look forward to hearing from more of you and getting to know you better. Thank you again. lvlagnum.

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I know of no law that says a Canadian or any other foreign visitor cannot be invited as a guest to a privately owned claim. The American SW is studded with prospecting clubs. Some of these have very reasonable annual fees (many are less than an out-of-state fishing license would cost you). There is no license or permit required for metal detecting. By joining a local club or two you will have access to club claims and, more importantly, you will get acquainted with local people, local customs and American mining laws. The new administration is not yet in office and it usually takes several months before any changes begin taking effect. Cheers.

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You might want to research the area around Colbalt,Ont. That was a very rich silver mining district where people were finding huge native silver nuggets all over the place with metal detectors. I have no doubt there's more out there someplace. Just need to get permission from the landowners.

Steve

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Guest bedrock bob

"1. I understand from reading your posts that both skill and some degree of luck is required to find gold and or meteorites but is it possible for a skilled "Nugget Shooter" who who is out with his or her detector for say thirty-five or fourty hours a week, to make a reasonable living from this "hobby"?"

Fella, I have met a hundred fellows who insist they are "making a reasonable living" with a nugget bone. I suppose your definition of "reasonable" is the key. Yes, there will be days you do well. I can only speak for myself, but I can do almost ANYTHING and make more money than prospecting. I know of no one who is making a living solely by prospecting and has a style of living much above neanderthal. It is a great supplement to a fixed income, a healthy hobby, a worthy endeavor, but a career it is not.

I have been working placer and hard rock for about 30 years now. At one point I did it full time on a small operation. I could recover about a half ounce of gold per day with about a 25% overhead. This was for a 12-14 hour day behind a shovel. I tried different methods and processes and it was best to keep it simple and keep overhead low. There may be a way to squeeze a little more profit out of an average spot, but for all practical purposes I would consider it a hobby. There are few exceptions.

Mining gravel with NO GOLD is a much more lucrative venture than digging gravel with gold. Mining rock with NO GOLD will pay 4X as much as mining ore and processing it, if you consider ore at <1 oz. per ton. It is also easier to get your permits and inspections for a gravel or rock operation, whether you are saving the gold or not. A top of the line detector is equal to 4 ounces of coarse placer (more or less). At 1/4 oz per weekend (a very liberal projection) it would take 16 weekends (plus overhead) to just break even on the detector. My guess is that it will take a year to be able to develop the knowledge to get your 1/4 oz. per weekend (and you will never be able to maintain this recovery steadily). So, your break even point on the basic equipment should come within about two years or so. From then on you should be just rolling in the money.

I know a lot of guys that take it very seriously and really go for the gold. It has been my experience that they are the least happy of them all. My advice is to keep it real, enjoy yourself, and dont start equating gold with money until you can make the numbers work on a prospecting venture.

Bedrock Bob

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1. I understand from reading your posts that both skill and some degree of luck is required to find gold and or meteorites but is it possible for a skilled "Nugget Shooter" who who is out with his or her detector for say thirty-five or fourty hours a week, to make a reasonable living from this "hobby"?

If you get really lucky- you might be able to survive but you won't have any fun doing it. It's almost imperative that you have some sort of an income. :twocents:

Steve

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Hello, Micro Nugget.

I have read some of the posts that mention prospecting clubs and that sounds like a great idea. I haven't found any in my area yet but I'll keep looking. I think it's great that some of the clubs down there have claims of their own where members and guests can nugget shoot in safety and without property hastles. I admire the way many of you get together, have a good time and help each other. If and when I ever get down there, I would very much look forward to meeting some of you and perhaps even learning from you pros.

Greetings, Goldfinger.

Thank you for the tip about Cobalt. That area is about an eight hour drive north of me. I also know there are some hardrock gold mines in the Timmins area an hour or two farther north than that. That whole area has rather flat terrain so I'm not sure if that is suitable for detecting as in placer deposits you find in the mountains and such. I really don't have the knowledge about nugget shooting yet to be able to judge that or not.

Hi, bedrock bob.

I understand what you mean by neanderthal living. I have gathered from everyone else's posts that no one is getting filthy rich nugget shooting. At least no that they will admit. I'm not independantly wealthy but I have the means to make a fresh start. After fifteen years in the Canadian Army Reserve, I worked in the auto industry for twentythree years and I've had enough of the big city and factory work. I'd like to find something to carry me through to an early retirement even if that means relocating. I'm looking at the current downturn in the auto industry and economy in general as an opportunity for me to look at my options. I have already guesstimated matters like startup costs and such from the equipment prices I have seen mentioned in previous posts. Of course things always seem to cost twice as much and take three times as long to do as we first anticipate, don't they? I wouldn't expect to be up to the calibre of you folks right away. I'm sure it would take a few years if ever. But that's part of the appeal of it. I love being outdoors and I haven't found anything that peaks my interest like this since my Army days. If only I could go back thirty years in time.

Hello, fred mason.

I've heard that there are a lot of retired and vacationing "snowbirds" who frequent the southwest United States. It used to be that we Canadians could be out of the country for up to six months at a time before losing entitlements to our government programmes such as healthcare but I'm not sure what the limit is now. Thanks for reminding me about that. I'll have to look it up. I certainly hope that my fellow Canucks behave themselves while they are down there and don't cause you folks too much trouble. I hope it wont be much of a bother if one more were to show up on your doorstep to "drink yur licker an steal yur wimmin" would it?

Hi, frank c.

Thank you for the tip about Leslie. Every piece of information and any leads I get from you wonderful folks on this forum are valuable. I really haven't been able to find much in formation about activities in Canada yet. Perhaps I'm just not looking in the right place. With the holidays fast approaching, I haven't had much time to research. I'll look forward to corresponding with your friend.

I would like to thank you all for the welcomes and information. Every little bit helps even if you might think it's insignificant. I'm sure you people have forgotten more about detecting than I'll ever know. Please don't hesitate to post anything else that comes to mind. In the mean time, if there is any information I can provide or anything I can do in return, please don't hesitate to ask. Cheers, lvlagnum.

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Magnum

Hello and welcome.

The Canadian mining laws are different in each Province,not Federal.

Each province makes its own mining laws. I have a real good friend

that lives at Kamloops.

Here is a site that contains dozens of Canadian prospecting clubs.

www.goldminershq.com How aboot that EH!

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Magnum...you can have all the women you can catch, they ain't mine...as for a bother, come on down and join the maddening crowd...I have read there has been as much as a million people at or around Quartzsite in the winter months...

anyway, my camp always will offer you drinks or food depending on when you show up...it is the Western Way.

Fred

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Hello sawmill.

Thank you for that information and the website. I took a quick look and didn't find anything in my imediate area but if I contact some of the clubs listed, they may be able to guide me farther. At this point, any leed is a good leed.

Greetings again fredmason and Micro Nugget.

Thank you both for the kind offer of your hospitality. I just might take you up on it some day.

I have traveled in the New England area and Florida but I have never been to the southwest. Places like Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, California and Texas have always been of interest to me. Perhaps it is from watching too many western movies when I was a kid but I'd love to see that area some day. From what I've seen in pictures, it looks beautiful. Where I live, the only open land outside the cities is either fenced off farmer's fields or dense forest trees and cedar swamps that you can't see through much less get through. I sincerely hope where ever you are isn't like that too. It would be nice to be able to stand somewhere, see hills and mountains in the distance and find no fences to stop me walking from here to there. I think that the only thing that could be better than that is to squint the glare from my eyes, whipe my brow, look down and see that first yellow nugget glinting in the sun in front of the toe of my dusty boot.

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Thanks for the tease fredmason.

I'm just about to head out to shovel the six inches of blowing heavy snow that we just got and you just had to show me that magnificent view. I've been told there's a special place for people like you but I can't quite remember what it's called? We're expecting another dump of this white stuff on sunday as well. Seriously though, that is exactly what I see in my mind when I think of the southwest. Thank you for sharing it with me. lvlagnum.

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Hello again fredmason.

I'm sure you'll be envious to learn that it turned out to be a foot of heavy blowing snow topped off with two foot deep windrows left by the passing snowplough and three driveways of that to boot. I know that you all wanted to be right beside me with a shovel but I'm sure you'll understand if I insist that you stay down there and keep an eye on things. It sure is some beautiful sceenery you have down there. I'm looking forward to experiencing it for myself some day. I'm even looking forward to the sidewinders and scorpions. How twisted is that?

In the mean time, if anyone has more answers to my original questions, please feel free to chime in. Every little bit of information helps. Remember that I'm not just looking for Canadian information but also how things are done down there. It should be interesting to compare the two. Cheers, lvlagnum.

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:coffeetime: :coffeetime: :coffeetime: Sorry I can't chime in right now myself Magnum as I need to shovel a foot of snow away from my walk and drive too. Yep Late tonight or Sunday morning brings another storm. So be the life in NH in the winter!! Oh ... That's right it's still Fall for another day or so. :grrr01: I wonder what winter will bring! :hmmmmmm:

Mike F.

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Hello Mike Furness and thank you for he welcome.

It's good to run into some folks on this forum who even know what snow is much less what those odd shaped wide shovels are actualy for. I had someone in Florida try to tell me that those wide shovels are suposed to be used with wide push brooms like a giant dustpan to make sweeping the floor easier. I've been to Vermont and New Hampshire twice on vacations in the summer but I have to admit that I haven't been brave enough to visit there in the winter yet. I have many fond memories of camping and hiking at Franconia Notch. I would be interested to know what if any prospecting and or nugget shooting oportunities are available there in your area? Cheers, lvlagnum.

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aw quit your whining, Dudes...everyone knows the snow is sooooooooooo pretty...

just kidding, of course. I lived in northern california in the 70's and early 80's...shovelling snow after those blasted road graders was never fun because they invaribally came through during the night and by morning the pile was solid ice...I don't think I am up to constant snow battles like I once was...

Merry Christmas

Fred

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Magnum,

If you were in Franconia you just needed to dip your pan and gather the colors. Cold Brook and all tributaries has fine glacier gold. go up to the top of NH and you can pan goldnear the Canadian border and then go over to central Vermont and pan some more. Maine also has a little of the Glacier Gold in the western mountains which is still part of the White Mtn National Forest. Forget the metal detector, sluice, high banker and dredge as they are not allowed. You might get away with a small rocker but those that prospect mostly just abide by the rules which specifically allow a pan. you won't get rich but you can say that you have Northern New England gold.

BTW ... final tally here in Exeter NH for the two storms ... 27 inches of the white fluffy stuff. That is usually all we get for the whole month this time of year. I have a feeling we are going to have another heavy snow year like last year. We'll have a white Christmas for sure.

And what was that ... giant dust pans ... come on! :innocent0009: :laught16:

Mike F

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Hello again, fredmason.

You're absolutely right. Sometimes the snow and the formations it can take can be very beautiful. As I'm typing this I am looking out my livingroom window and can see a clump of snow hanging from the roof that has been building up for days. The only way I can describe it for those unfortunate enough to have never seen such a thing is to pucture a gingerbread house that is so overflowing with white frosting on it's roof that it flows over the eaves in a sheet like a pure white blanket. Unfortunately, my military service has given me several nasty ocurances of frostbite in my fingers and toes and has left me with poor circulation in my hands and feet. Shovelling snow isn't as much fun as it used to be but I find that trigger mitts help much more at protecting my hands than gloves do. I have a beautiful pair of trigger mitts that my now ex-wife gave me for Christmas many years ago. Every year, I still thank her for that gift. Cheers, lvlagnum.

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Greetings again, Mike Furness.

I have long known about the riches that the New England states have in their natural beauty but I had no idea there was gold in them thar hills. I hope you are getting more than your share for your panning efforts. As for the giant dustpan story? It's the absolute truth. Some day I will have to tell you about the young couple from Queens, New York that I met in Niagara Falls who had snow skis strapped to the roof of their car and expected to be able to go downhill skiing a few hours north of Toronto in July. Cheers, lvlagnum.

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