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trish

It weighs 14lbs and has silver inside

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I had this rock in my possesion for a month before meteorite ever crossed my mind, i found this thing while metal detecting my father in laws land. It set off my metal detector and i dug it up 3 inches out of the ground. It weighs 14 lbs, is 7 inches its longest deminsion, and 5 inches its shortest deminsion, and 15 inches around. The outside is black, and after cleaning it up i could see silver specks through the black outter crust. A friend of mine offered to take a sample and put it under a SEM EX machine to see what kind of minerals are in it. It does not hold a magnet, and the nickle test i did at home came back negative. So far his test has shown that it does have a small amount of iron in it, but not enough to attract a magnet, thats as far as he got before they had a power surge and the machine went down. I have sent a sample to the Smithsonian havent heard anything from them, i heard it may take them a year to test a sample.

If its slag what kind of slag would it be that has a small amount of iron in it? Why its so mind bloggling is because i found it in the middle of the pasture, how it got there i'll never know. Went back to see if i could find anymore and found nothing. I know all meteorites have nickle in them, but I'm wondering if the very rare meteorties have nickle in them, and would they have enough nickle in them to show possitive if you did a nickle test? I do have a friend who found a meteorite, half of hers was magnetic, the other wasnt.

Even the brownish/gold color you see sparkles, im just haveing a hard time trying to figure out what it could be, especially because of its size and its density.

Any help on what kind of slag it could be would be greatly appreciated. Thanks all for taking the time to read my post.

Trish

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Hi Trish;

if you read through the old posts you will know that pictures are a difficult way to identify meteorites...perhaps a clear close-up of the broken part and the exterior would help. I don't think it is slag...just don't look slagish, are you close to slag producing operations? People haul rocks around for many reasons and when they are tired of carrying them or they have served their purpose the rock gets dumped...to leave a mystery for you and me. I think that a rare-earth magnet would be attracted to the rock if there was any reasonable amount of iron present...if there was space-iron there would be nickel and from the looks of the rock chondrules...unless you have a huge piece of mars but that is way unlikely...good luck!

Fred

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Hi Trish;

Some very interesting photographs and as Fred stated, it's a tough call. Close up of the broken surface would help, but when I first saw this, it did raise my pulse. The weight you describe and the size is very interesting, also the surface. If it is a meteorwrong, it's a darn good one.

Keep us informed.

Cheers

Johnno

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Hi Fred!

Yes i do know that you cant tell anything by looking at a photo, i just posted so you all could get some idea of what it looks like. I dont know if you can tell by clicking on the photos but the inside is very shiny silver.

No slag producing operations anywhere close. It is definately a mystery for me Fred. I've racked my brain trying to find out what it is. No one seems to know. I've even shown it to the Old Timers and they've never seen anything like it. I thought if it were slag they would have seen it sometimes during their life. and know by looking at it what it was. But no one knows.

Fred? where would i get a 'rare earth magnet'? I suppose i would probably have to order it from the internet?

Thanks for your help!

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Hi Johnno!

I've tried to get a close up shot of the inside, but the light inside my house isnt that good, and when i take it outside to try and get a close up, the silver is so shiny you cant tell much from the photo because of its brightness. Hope that made sense. I really appreciate you and Fred commenting on my post. All help is greatly appreciated.

Trish.

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Hi Trish...Looks like either galena or molyndbemb (totally bad spelling)...Both are metalic and shiney but not attracted magnetically...It doesn't look like a meteorite...My guess would be the m. word I can't spell... :laught16: ...Cheers, Unc

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Hi Ron.

I've looked at Galena on the web and the only simularity is the silver, almost anyway.

Havent found anything that compairs to my rock.

Sure was hopeing it was a falling star. I've always wanted one. lol

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Hi Ron.

I've looked at Galena on the web and the only simularity is the silver, almost anyway.

Havent found anything that compairs to my rock.

Sure was hopeing it was a falling star. I've always wanted one. lol

might be pure manganese (figure 9.14 on page 179 of O. Richard Norton's...Field Guide to meteors and meteorites), manganese is non magnetic. Very cool rock, I hope it's a meteorite> Good luck

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Slag is not very dense, and that rock looks dense.

There is a difference between reflection off small round beads of metal exposed

and the reflection from flat(planar) flecks of mica.

I think it looks like granite or some metamorphosed rock.

[Erik]

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Hi Ron,

I believe it's spelled Molybdenum. Could be, but odds are against it. I'd like a close-up of the interior beforew I guess.

Ben

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sorry guys i dont have a close up. But i can email the pictures to any of you who would like to see a bigger picture, might give you a better idea of what the inside looks like if you open it from your email.

Anything to help me figure out what it is.

BIG thanks to all of you for the help.

Trish

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Hi Trish, welcome to the forum. You'll find a lot of knowledgeable meteorite hunters here.

Looking at your find from the outside it's very hard to determin exactly what that is. Your best bet is to cut it and see exactly what it looks like on the inside. To get a good pic, try using the macro setting on your camera. Here's a good pic of what a chondrite looks like on the inside after it's been cut-

MetalFleks.jpg

Hope this helps.

Del

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Hi Trish, welcome to the forum. You'll find a lot of knowledgeable meteorite hunters here.

Looking at your find from the outside it's very hard to determin exactly what that is. Your best bet is to cut it and see exactly what it looks like on the inside. To get a good pic, try using the macro setting on your camera. Here's a good pic of what a chondrite looks like on the inside after it's been cut-

Hope this helps.

Del

Thanks love....meant to send you a pm on T-Net to tell you thank you for the NuggetShooter Info...great site! I've thought about cutting my rock, but im afraid to until i find out what it is. What do you think i should do? What if it does turn out to be a meteorite and i've ruined it by cutting it? lol.....I'm scared

Fabulous picture you have there!

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Aloha Trish,

See if there is a rockhound club nearby as they might have a lapidary saw one of their members can use to cut you a piece. Ruining a meteorite? Nah, you will just set your mind at ease on what this rock is finaloly. Someone also should be able to help you with a description.

Aloha and good luck,

Stan aka Kaimi

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Trish,

You do not need to cut the large piece, just grind a good flat spot on the chip and take a picture of that.

I also think that we should get Bill to change your forum status to New Gal, instead of New Guy.

Welcome to the forum...

Jim

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Kaimi! Hi!

I have a Geologist friend who can cut it for me, he has all the rock cutting equipment. I really would love to see the inside of it myself! I think i may try and get it done this weekend. (If i dont chicken out!) Maybe i will get a good 'inside' picture for you all to see.

Jim? Thank you for the welcome!

I've tried to get a picture of the chipped peice, but as i said before the light on the inside of my house isnt very good, and when i took it out doors to try and get a better shot, the silver was just to bright. Maybe i need to buy myself a new camera for Christmas, whadda think? lol. I'll give it another try.

And if Bill could change me from a New Guy to a New Gal? That would be great! lol...i tried, guess im doing something wrong. Havent quite figured out the Nugget shooter settings yet.. but i will eventually.

Wishing all of you Wonderful and Blessed Hollidays!

Trish

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Welcome to the forum Trish. If it's not a space rock its neat whatever it is. I'd be dang interested in finding out what it is.

HH - Johnny

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Hi Trish,

You said it doesn't test positive for nickel and doesn't seem to be attracted to a magnet. Those are both bad signs, but doesn't absolutely rule out meteoric origin.

You might do your experimentation on the already broken off chip, thereby not affecting the main rock, just in case.

I would take an inner section of the broken chip (not the crust or rind), smash it up to fine granules or powder and then test it for nickel. The nickel test is important because if it has nickel in it, it is most likely a meteorite. By crushing it up to small particles, you are better chancing exposing the small nickel specks that would be typical in a stony meteorite, which it may be.

Doubtful it's an iron, or even a stony- iron if a magnet doesn't just jump on it, especially for it's size. However, I have two rocks in my front yard that I found in a field the same way you did, metal detecting, and neither attracted even a large magnet (150 Lb pull) that I bought from KellyCo so I assumed they were probably not meteorites.

HOWEVER<>>>>>When I used a rare Earth magnet, N52- 1"x 2"x .5" I could tell a small attraction to BOTH rocks which again put them in the meteorite maybe category until I can get around to doing the nickel testing that I mentioned above. It will be a real lesson for me, if they turn out to be meteorites. Hope this helps.

Joe

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Thank you Johnny, im enjoying all the helpful responses. I cant wait to find out what it is either.

Joe i appreciate the helpful info...i'll try the nickle test again. It was kinda weird. Although i've never done a nickle test before. But the nickle test i ordered from http://www.meteoritesplus.com/meteoritetestkit.html

they also send you little bits of meteorites to test along with your own sample. Well im testing theirs and mine at the same time, and it says look for bright strawberry red, well they both started turning bright strawberry red, my heart started racing, then the longer it sat, the darker mine got...then evenually it looked like mud and turned a dirty brown.

~*~

Ok i took your advice Joe and did the nickle test again just using the silver part, this time its still not bright stawberry red, its just pink...... :cry2:

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What do you all think about the possibility of it being 'Shuttle Debri?' A friend of mine, well actually 2 friends seem to think that it may be from the shuttle. I live 60 miles east of Waco texas. I think the path of the shuttle debri was more east of us, but there is still that possibility.

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Trish and all,

I don't know why this is still questioned. Trish, you sent me a sample a few months ago and I told you it is defintately NOT a meteorite. I'm sure it's not! Not even close, it looks a lot like galena. It took about 2 seconds to determine that it's not space junk, not a meteorite at all! Sorry Trish, I know you wish it were but it is NOT! If you send me your address again I'll mail you a couple of meteorites for you to compare.

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Well Hi there RUBEN!

If you'll read the rest of my post..im pretty sure its some sort of slag...And yes i did send a sample to the Smithsonian, Reason being because i want it tested, a peice of "slag" just doesnt end up in the middle of a pasture! 3 inches in sandy land at that. If it would have been laying there for a long period of time it would have been deeper in the ground as heavy as it is. I dont want someone to just look at it and say "naw thats not a meteorite." I did NOT think for one minute you didnt know what you were talking about Ruben....

Robert Haag called me also, when you still had my sample, and said he didnt think it was a meteorite, just by looking at my picture, and i was just gonna leave it alone after that, UNTIL someone i know found a meteorite and Robert Haag told her it wasnt one! Come to find out IT WAS! (And he's a bigger pro than you are) She found out after she sent it off to be tested that he was wrong.(Sorry Mr. Haag) He said it wasnt only because it wouldnt attract a magnet. Hers was magnetic on one side and not the other.

SO you see, even the pro's can be wrong sometimes Ruben....no offense to you at all....

Remember the first time you saw the pictures i emailed you? You called me and said you were pretty sure it was a meteorite, that you were almost certain? Then i sent you a sample, im not sure what you did to test it, but you called me the same day you got it and said it wasnt one like you had first thought.

No offense so dont take it as me not trusting your word Ruben....

NOW...i got on here thinking if someone has seen this type of rock or what ever it is, they could help me out...i didnt get on here to hurt your ego.

One more thing....you can send me all the meteorites you want!

Sorry Guys.

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Trish,

From the picture it did and does look promising, but even a first or second year meteorite hunter would have known it wasn't one as soon as he looked at it in person. I didn't test it, as our goal wasn't to find out what kind of slag it was.

So you are convinced that it's not a meteorite and just want to know what kind of slag it is? Smithsonian isn't likely to spend much time telling you that...

I don't think it's slag anyway, I said it was like galena like. But fine, thats ok.

However, if you think that slag just doesn't end up in the middle of nowhere YOU"RE WRONG it does! We have all found slag 20-30 miles (or more) off the beaten path for no reason.

In Glorieta I climbed the highest mountain I could find and then ventured onto a cliff face where I thought only a meteorite (and birds could get to) when I got a signal on my detector I was sure it was a meteorite! It was not, instead it was a monopoly piece! I have no idea how it got there but it did!

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actually, when i first contacted Smithsonian, i told them it was probably some sort of slag, but if it wasnt could they tell me what it may be, and they said they would be happy to give me an assessment as to what it is. They were told upfront, but offered to help anyway.

It may not be slag, i dont know what it is...no one seems to know. I've even shown it to a Geologist friend who has traveled all over the U.S collecting minerals for his collecton and he's never even seen anything like this before. This man has almost every mineral/rock you can imagine, but he doesnt have one of these.

Where i live, Limestone is so abundant our county was named after it. I've lived here my whole life, rock hunted as a kid but i've never seen Galena. I've been through creek beds, sands pits, you name it i've been there. Not saying its not here, i've just never seen it.

anyway, i still appreciate you Ruben.

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You've got man-made product (silicide) used in the iron industry for scavenging contaminants or for adding precise amounts of alloys. It's neat stuff. It's so dense it feels like a canon ball, with the appearance of chrome when the brittle material is chipped with the sharp blow of a hammer.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicide

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