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Looking for help with some info on meteorite books and tools


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Hi all....Which books on meteorites come with lots of color photos? I have a couple, but most have black and white photos which aren't quite as useful for learning what meteorites look like.

Does anyone know where to get a good 10x loupe, my 7x is too weak and my 20x is worthless?

Have there been any new books out in the last year or videos?

When cutting a suspected meteorite, is it cool to use a tile wet saw for both stonys and irons?

If a rock is attracted to a magnet, has a fusion crust and you can see tiny silver metal flakes nearly with the naked eye, and easily with a 7x loupe even before you slice it open, is it a good bet it's a meteorite?

Speaking of magnets, do you use rare earth magnets just because they are stronger than a normal magnet or is it for a different reason, all together? I have some magnets I bought from KellyCo, they are pretty strong, 50lb, 100lb and 150lb pull magnets, will they do the trick? If not, who sells rare earth magnets?

I am real hesitant in cutting open my meteorite maybes in fear I will ruin them. I bought a bench grinder and I am going to try that first. Are you supposed to use a coarse wheel or fine?

Sorry for the twenty questions, I am totally new at this and hope I am not being too needy. Thanks for any info, much appreciated. :confused0013:

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Aloha Big Jeff,

You should be able to find a good loupe at any rockhound/mineral store for a decent price. As far as books are concerned you should check ebay first as they usually have a boat load of books on this subject. As far as cutting meteorites, I dont just because Ai like them in their natural state. I usually just file a small window in them so others can see the nickle particles. I get my rare earth magnets from CMS Magnetics online, real good prices and great service to date.

BTW, if it looks like a meteorite with all the indicative signs YES it is one. When in doubt just file a window and take a peek.

Hope this helps some.

Good luck and be safe out there.

Aloha,

Stan aka Kaimi

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Digit- All three of O. Richard Norton's books have great color plates...I suggest you start with his newest release, A Field Guide to Metorites...I brought the thread back to the top for you. Next I would get Rocks From Space and last the Cambridge encyclopedia...pardon if the title or spelling is abit off, if you look you will find them.

I would get a two or three lens magnifier with each lens being 10x...for when you need 20x or 30x

fred

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G'Day Digi

A little list credit ( Al Mitterling )

Cheers Johnno

Bagnall, Philip, 1991. THE METEORITE & TEKTITE COLLECTORS HANDBOOK (highly recommended if you can find a copy)

Richmond, VA: Willmann-Bell. A true handbook with basic background, classification, collecting guidelines, preservation, etc... 170 pp, 37 photos, 26 tables, $25. Must have!

Buckwald, V.F. 1975. HANDBOOK OF IRON METEORITES, Vol 1-3.

Los Angeles: U. California and Arizona State U Press. Comprehensive and expensive. $400 - $1000.00 or more now these days when found.

Burke, John G. 1986. COSMIC DEBRIS: METEORITES IN HISTORY

Berkeley: U of California Press. Chapters include Disbelief, Acceptance, Mathematical Astronomy and Statistics, Nineteenth Century Foundations of Meteorite Analysis, Late Nineteenth Century Meteorite Theories, Curators and Collectors, Folklore Myth and Utility, New Directions 1900-1950, and Contemporary Meteorite Research and Theories. Very comprehensive with extensive reference section. 445pages. Must have!

Dodd, R.T. 1986. THUNDERSTONES AND SHOOTING STARS

Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Extremely readable but very comprehensive basic textbook on Meteoritics. This is my personal favorite and taught me the most. Very illuminating. 196 pages, about $25. To die for!

Graham, A W, et al. 1985. THE CATALOGUE OF METEORITES -- 4TH Edition.

This is a reference book with catalogue listing of meteorites up through January 1984. This is an expansion on the classic catalogues from the British Museum of Natural History and lists over 1400 of these meteorites as belonging in the British collection. Doesn't include much of the newer Antarctic finds, for which one needs to refer to METEORITICS journal's periodic Meteoritical Bulletins. As a catalogue, the information is referential and somewhat skeletal, almost just a "phone book" for short blurts. Find myself referring to it often, though never quite satisfied with the limited info contained. 460 pages, about $75.

Heide, Fritz. 1964. METEORITES

Chicago: University of Chicago Press. A dated by classic basic text. There is a new edition of this out just recent and copies of the new release are available at this time. Tells much of the ABC's of meteorites.

There is a newer updated version of this one.

Hoyt, William G. 1987. COON MOUNTAIN CONTROVERSIES: METEOR CRATER AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF IMPACT THEORY

Tucson: U of Arizona Press. I read this book the week before my second visit/pilgrimage to Meteor(ite) Crater outside of Winslow, Arizona, and it added immensely to my experience of again hiking around the rim of Barringer's crater that sunny but cold winter day. This account of the personalities and controversy that historically surrounded the recognition of Meteor Crater for what it was, an impact astroblem, is, again, very readable and informative.

Daniel Moreau Barringer, a mining entrepreneur, was trespassing on Coon Mountain, which was earlier declared to be of volcanic origin by G.K. Gilbert, chief geologist of the USGS. Barringer reasoned that with the association of iron meteorites being found so close to the circular crater, hat there was a mass of iron buried in its floor and staked a mining claim on it. His extensive drilling and tunneling efforts amounted to the first comprehensive study of an impact site to have been undertaken anywhere, leading to hard evidence that gave Meteoritics a legitimate standing among the sciences. 366 pages. About $50 hardcover.

Hutchison, Robert & Andrew Graham. 1993. Meteorites

Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. New York. This a fairly new book out and has a lot of color photos of various meteorites. It covers a wide variety of topics related to meteorites on an introductory level. 61 pages. $10.95

Keil, Klaus and Gomez, Celso. 1980. BRAZILIAN STONE METEORITES

Albuquerque: U of New Mexico Press. This is a scholarly and technically difficult book (for me!) with a surprising amount of mineralogical information. The first half of the book is an intro to basic Meteoritics with a tremendous amount of information compressed into 46 long long pages! The mineralogy was often beyond me but helpful as later reference from other readings. The second half of the book was again a fairly in-depth cataloging of Brazilian meteorites, including the Angra dos Reis (the only Angrite!) and the Governador Valadares (Nahklite). In contrast to Graham's CATALOGUE, each meteorite was explored in detail, including fall circumstances, texture, mineralogy, chemical composition , Age, origin and available sources.

Meteorites and the Early Solar System. 1988

The University of Arizona Press. Editors John F. Kerridge and Mildred Shapley Matthews. This is a thick book with 69 collaborating authors. It covers a wide spectrum of meteoritics and current ideas related to the study of meteorites by many well respected scientists of this day. Contains some deep reading and advanced understanding of meteoritics are helpful. 1269 pages.

McSween, Harry Y. Jr. 1987. METEORITES AND THEIR PARENT PLANETS

New York: Cambridge U Press. Along with his more recent book, STARDUST TO PLANETS (1993), provides a very geological and mineralogical view of the solar system and the genesis of meteorites. Along with Dodd's book, establishes a very adequate working background of information on most corners of Meteoritics. 256 pages, about $33.

Also a newer version of this one in the last 6 or 7 years.

Nininger, H.H. 1972. FIND A FALLING STAR

New York: Paul S. Eriksson, Inc. A classic autobiography of this foremost meteorite expert and his fifty years of obsessive love with meteorites, his efforts that brought the resurgence of interest in Meteoritics, his struggle for respect among the giants in this field, his personal account of how he amassed the largest personal collection of meteorites. 254 pages, $25. Must have!

Nininger, H.H (not sure of the date) Our Stone Pelted Planet

(one of Nininger's earlier books on the subject of meteorites)

Nininger, H.H. 1956. Arizona's Meteorite Crater

American Meteorite Laboratory - Denver, Colorado. This is a book about the famous meteor(ite) crater in Arizona written by Nininger. In it he discusses past, present and future of the crater. A great amount of scientific research has been done at the crater and Nininger himself discusses condensation products, Impactite particles, observation on diamonds and much more about the crater.

Nininger, H.H. 1961. Ask A Question About Meteorites

American Meteorite Laboratory. This is a small information book about meteorites. In it Nininger explains alot of the common questions often asked of him about meteorites. It discusses meteors and meteorites, nature of meteorites, classes, meteorite clouds and dust, meteorite craters, and tektites. Some information is outdated. $5

Nininger, H.H. 1942. A Comet Strikes The Earth

American Meteorite Lab. Another small information book put out by Nininger in a two part series. One deals with large impacts on the Earth including the Siberian fall. The other deals with meteors and meteorites telling the reader what they are and where they come from. The book contains meteorite oxide that is a part of meteor(ite) crater. $5 harder to find than Ask a Question.

Nininger, H.H. 1947. Chips From The Moon

Desert Press, Inc. Palm Desert, California. This deal with the issue of tektites and where they might come from. Although outdated as the theory of Moon origin of tektites have been disproved, it has a lot of useful information on tektites all the same. It is yet another small book put out by the great author.

Nininger, H.H. 1971. The Published Papers of Harvey Harlow Nininger

Center for Meteorite Studies, Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona. As the book suggests a list of the published papers put out by Nininger in regards to a great number of scientific papers he presented. Is a nice book to have for Nininger fans. Contains much useful information about various meteorites that he found or brought to light. $50 hard to find. (highly recommended if you can find a copy)

Nininger, H.H. 1952. Out of the Sky

The University of Denver Press. This is an introduction to meteoritics by Nininger. Again this is outdated but contains useful information. This covers a wide variety of subjects in regards to meteorites. Some of the topics include: Early Man and Meteorites, Typical Falls, Composition, Structure, Size, Weathering, origin and much more.

Nininger, H.H. 1977. Center for Meteorite Studies Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona. Meteorites A Photographic Study of Surfaces Part 1. Shapes and Part 2. Orientation.

Excellent resource books by Nininger for collectors and researchers. Explains the many interesting shapes created by the dynamic forces present during a fall of meteoroid material in our atmosphere. List many well known falls and shows a number of the Nininger Collection of meteorites. $90 for both books if it can be found.

Anything Nininger wrote is worth having and if you see a copy somewhere it is recommended to buy. You can always resale to someone who will want the copy.

Norton, O. Richard. 1994. ROCKS FROM SPACE

Meteorites and Meteorite Hunters. Montana: Mountain Press Publishing Co. This book is definitely geared for the amateur enthusiast and as such has my gratitude for it's friendly readability. Lots of material is present on meteoritic basics, mineralogy, theories,...but doesn't pretend to be a basic textbook on Meteoritics. Not a rigorous presentation. Has a real human-interest slant with a sublimated account of H.H. Nininger's career (the original Meteorite Man!) and author's own perspective on Robert A. Haag--Meteorite Man. Very entertaining reading. 446 pages, and only $20 paperback!

Norton, O. Richard The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Meteorites

Norton, O. Richard Field guide to meteors and meteorites 2008

O'Keefe, John A. 1976. TEKTITES AND THEIR ORIGIN

Amsterdam Netherlands: Elseveir Scientific Publishing. An encyclopedic compilation of information on tektites along with author's own controversial hypothesis regarding their origin. 255 pages, $35. Pushes lunar origin for tektites even though most scientists agree that Earth impacts are the more logical origin.

Pearl, Richard M. 1975. Fallen From Heaven Meteorites and Man

Earth Science Publishing Company Colorado Springs, Colorado. A book of 100 of the most intriguing and famous human interest stories related to the meteorites. These are arranged in alphabetical order by name of the fall or find. Also contains some good background on meteorites. 72 pages.

Peck, Ellis L. SPACE ROCKS AND BUFFALO GRASS

This is a personal account of how Mary Kimberley, a pioneer bride, immediately recognized the rusted black stones common to her homestead property as meteorites and set out to amass a large pile estimated to be over a ton of these heavy stones. She then set forth to have her discovery acknowledge with five years of letter-writing. These pallasites, named Brenham or Haviland, later played a major role in establishing H.H. Nininger, and later, Robert Haag, as meteorite enthusiasts with an economic incentive to boot. This story is part of the folklore of Meteoritics and, I believe, a must-read. 116 pages. About $20.

Wasson, John T. 1985. METEORITES: THEIR RECORD OF EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM HISTORY

New York: W H Freeman. Another excellent source of very readable information similar in perspective to McSween's use of meteorites to build a workable model of planetary and solar evolution. Would work well as a dependable comprehensive textbook on Meteoritics. 267 pages, about $33. Another must.

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G'Day Digi

A little list credit ( Al Mitterling )

Cheers Johnno

Bagnall, Philip, 1991. THE METEORITE & TEKTITE COLLECTORS HANDBOOK (highly recommended if you can find a copy)

Richmond, VA: Willmann-Bell. A true handbook with basic background, classification, collecting guidelines, preservation, etc... 170 pp, 37 photos, 26 tables, $25. Must have!

Buckwald, V.F. 1975. HANDBOOK OF IRON METEORITES, Vol 1-3.

Los Angeles: U. California and Arizona State U Press. Comprehensive and expensive. $400 - $1000.00 or more now these days when found.

Burke, John G. 1986. COSMIC DEBRIS: METEORITES IN HISTORY

Berkeley: U of California Press. Chapters include Disbelief, Acceptance, Mathematical Astronomy and Statistics, Nineteenth Century Foundations of Meteorite Analysis, Late Nineteenth Century Meteorite Theories, Curators and Collectors, Folklore Myth and Utility, New Directions 1900-1950, and Contemporary Meteorite Research and Theories. Very comprehensive with extensive reference section. 445pages. Must have!

Dodd, R.T. 1986. THUNDERSTONES AND SHOOTING STARS

Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Extremely readable but very comprehensive basic textbook on Meteoritics. This is my personal favorite and taught me the most. Very illuminating. 196 pages, about $25. To die for!

Graham, A W, et al. 1985. THE CATALOGUE OF METEORITES -- 4TH Edition.

This is a reference book with catalogue listing of meteorites up through January 1984. This is an expansion on the classic catalogues from the British Museum of Natural History and lists over 1400 of these meteorites as belonging in the British collection. Doesn't include much of the newer Antarctic finds, for which one needs to refer to METEORITICS journal's periodic Meteoritical Bulletins. As a catalogue, the information is referential and somewhat skeletal, almost just a "phone book" for short blurts. Find myself referring to it often, though never quite satisfied with the limited info contained. 460 pages, about $75.

Heide, Fritz. 1964. METEORITES

Chicago: University of Chicago Press. A dated by classic basic text. There is a new edition of this out just recent and copies of the new release are available at this time. Tells much of the ABC's of meteorites.

There is a newer updated version of this one.

Hoyt, William G. 1987. COON MOUNTAIN CONTROVERSIES: METEOR CRATER AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF IMPACT THEORY

Tucson: U of Arizona Press. I read this book the week before my second visit/pilgrimage to Meteor(ite) Crater outside of Winslow, Arizona, and it added immensely to my experience of again hiking around the rim of Barringer's crater that sunny but cold winter day. This account of the personalities and controversy that historically surrounded the recognition of Meteor Crater for what it was, an impact astroblem, is, again, very readable and informative.

Daniel Moreau Barringer, a mining entrepreneur, was trespassing on Coon Mountain, which was earlier declared to be of volcanic origin by G.K. Gilbert, chief geologist of the USGS. Barringer reasoned that with the association of iron meteorites being found so close to the circular crater, hat there was a mass of iron buried in its floor and staked a mining claim on it. His extensive drilling and tunneling efforts amounted to the first comprehensive study of an impact site to have been undertaken anywhere, leading to hard evidence that gave Meteoritics a legitimate standing among the sciences. 366 pages. About $50 hardcover.

Hutchison, Robert & Andrew Graham. 1993. Meteorites

Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. New York. This a fairly new book out and has a lot of color photos of various meteorites. It covers a wide variety of topics related to meteorites on an introductory level. 61 pages. $10.95

Keil, Klaus and Gomez, Celso. 1980. BRAZILIAN STONE METEORITES

Albuquerque: U of New Mexico Press. This is a scholarly and technically difficult book (for me!) with a surprising amount of mineralogical information. The first half of the book is an intro to basic Meteoritics with a tremendous amount of information compressed into 46 long long pages! The mineralogy was often beyond me but helpful as later reference from other readings. The second half of the book was again a fairly in-depth cataloging of Brazilian meteorites, including the Angra dos Reis (the only Angrite!) and the Governador Valadares (Nahklite). In contrast to Graham's CATALOGUE, each meteorite was explored in detail, including fall circumstances, texture, mineralogy, chemical composition , Age, origin and available sources.

Meteorites and the Early Solar System. 1988

The University of Arizona Press. Editors John F. Kerridge and Mildred Shapley Matthews. This is a thick book with 69 collaborating authors. It covers a wide spectrum of meteoritics and current ideas related to the study of meteorites by many well respected scientists of this day. Contains some deep reading and advanced understanding of meteoritics are helpful. 1269 pages.

McSween, Harry Y. Jr. 1987. METEORITES AND THEIR PARENT PLANETS

New York: Cambridge U Press. Along with his more recent book, STARDUST TO PLANETS (1993), provides a very geological and mineralogical view of the solar system and the genesis of meteorites. Along with Dodd's book, establishes a very adequate working background of information on most corners of Meteoritics. 256 pages, about $33.

Also a newer version of this one in the last 6 or 7 years.

Nininger, H.H. 1972. FIND A FALLING STAR

New York: Paul S. Eriksson, Inc. A classic autobiography of this foremost meteorite expert and his fifty years of obsessive love with meteorites, his efforts that brought the resurgence of interest in Meteoritics, his struggle for respect among the giants in this field, his personal account of how he amassed the largest personal collection of meteorites. 254 pages, $25. Must have!

Nininger, H.H (not sure of the date) Our Stone Pelted Planet

(one of Nininger's earlier books on the subject of meteorites)

Nininger, H.H. 1956. Arizona's Meteorite Crater

American Meteorite Laboratory - Denver, Colorado. This is a book about the famous meteor(ite) crater in Arizona written by Nininger. In it he discusses past, present and future of the crater. A great amount of scientific research has been done at the crater and Nininger himself discusses condensation products, Impactite particles, observation on diamonds and much more about the crater.

Nininger, H.H. 1961. Ask A Question About Meteorites

American Meteorite Laboratory. This is a small information book about meteorites. In it Nininger explains alot of the common questions often asked of him about meteorites. It discusses meteors and meteorites, nature of meteorites, classes, meteorite clouds and dust, meteorite craters, and tektites. Some information is outdated. $5

Nininger, H.H. 1942. A Comet Strikes The Earth

American Meteorite Lab. Another small information book put out by Nininger in a two part series. One deals with large impacts on the Earth including the Siberian fall. The other deals with meteors and meteorites telling the reader what they are and where they come from. The book contains meteorite oxide that is a part of meteor(ite) crater. $5 harder to find than Ask a Question.

Nininger, H.H. 1947. Chips From The Moon

Desert Press, Inc. Palm Desert, California. This deal with the issue of tektites and where they might come from. Although outdated as the theory of Moon origin of tektites have been disproved, it has a lot of useful information on tektites all the same. It is yet another small book put out by the great author.

Nininger, H.H. 1971. The Published Papers of Harvey Harlow Nininger

Center for Meteorite Studies, Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona. As the book suggests a list of the published papers put out by Nininger in regards to a great number of scientific papers he presented. Is a nice book to have for Nininger fans. Contains much useful information about various meteorites that he found or brought to light. $50 hard to find. (highly recommended if you can find a copy)

Nininger, H.H. 1952. Out of the Sky

The University of Denver Press. This is an introduction to meteoritics by Nininger. Again this is outdated but contains useful information. This covers a wide variety of subjects in regards to meteorites. Some of the topics include: Early Man and Meteorites, Typical Falls, Composition, Structure, Size, Weathering, origin and much more.

Nininger, H.H. 1977. Center for Meteorite Studies Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona. Meteorites A Photographic Study of Surfaces Part 1. Shapes and Part 2. Orientation.

Excellent resource books by Nininger for collectors and researchers. Explains the many interesting shapes created by the dynamic forces present during a fall of meteoroid material in our atmosphere. List many well known falls and shows a number of the Nininger Collection of meteorites. $90 for both books if it can be found.

Anything Nininger wrote is worth having and if you see a copy somewhere it is recommended to buy. You can always resale to someone who will want the copy.

Norton, O. Richard. 1994. ROCKS FROM SPACE

Meteorites and Meteorite Hunters. Montana: Mountain Press Publishing Co. This book is definitely geared for the amateur enthusiast and as such has my gratitude for it's friendly readability. Lots of material is present on meteoritic basics, mineralogy, theories,...but doesn't pretend to be a basic textbook on Meteoritics. Not a rigorous presentation. Has a real human-interest slant with a sublimated account of H.H. Nininger's career (the original Meteorite Man!) and author's own perspective on Robert A. Haag--Meteorite Man. Very entertaining reading. 446 pages, and only $20 paperback!

Norton, O. Richard The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Meteorites

Norton, O. Richard Field guide to meteors and meteorites 2008

O'Keefe, John A. 1976. TEKTITES AND THEIR ORIGIN

Amsterdam Netherlands: Elseveir Scientific Publishing. An encyclopedic compilation of information on tektites along with author's own controversial hypothesis regarding their origin. 255 pages, $35. Pushes lunar origin for tektites even though most scientists agree that Earth impacts are the more logical origin.

Pearl, Richard M. 1975. Fallen From Heaven Meteorites and Man

Earth Science Publishing Company Colorado Springs, Colorado. A book of 100 of the most intriguing and famous human interest stories related to the meteorites. These are arranged in alphabetical order by name of the fall or find. Also contains some good background on meteorites. 72 pages.

Peck, Ellis L. SPACE ROCKS AND BUFFALO GRASS

This is a personal account of how Mary Kimberley, a pioneer bride, immediately recognized the rusted black stones common to her homestead property as meteorites and set out to amass a large pile estimated to be over a ton of these heavy stones. She then set forth to have her discovery acknowledge with five years of letter-writing. These pallasites, named Brenham or Haviland, later played a major role in establishing H.H. Nininger, and later, Robert Haag, as meteorite enthusiasts with an economic incentive to boot. This story is part of the folklore of Meteoritics and, I believe, a must-read. 116 pages. About $20.

Wasson, John T. 1985. METEORITES: THEIR RECORD OF EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM HISTORY

New York: W H Freeman. Another excellent source of very readable information similar in perspective to McSween's use of meteorites to build a workable model of planetary and solar evolution. Would work well as a dependable comprehensive textbook on Meteoritics. 267 pages, about $33. Another must.

One day Johnno, we will meet one another and you will have to let me buy you dinner. Thanks for the monsterous list, cough, cough....... Index. Thanks again. Now for the stupid question.... which I hate to ask as you have speant so much time already; which of these books that you so graciously listed would likely include the most color photos?

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Hi Digitrich,

Good books? Take your pick, there's a lot of good ones out now. I'm partial to the ones by O. Richard Norton.

Good loupes at cheap prices can be found on ebay. I know, because I've left a few in the field!

As for videos, I'd recommend the ones by Ruben Ortega and Sonny Clary on their respective websites. Also, some nice videos have been made by other forum members including Jayray, Mike, and Paul. Even I have a poor-quality first video that can be seen if you scroll down to the forum topic - recent trip to holbrook. Check it out.

A tile saw is better than no saw but, a rock saw would be better. tile saws have thick blades and tend to waste a lot of material.

If you don't want to cut open your suspect meteorite yet, just take a diamond-file to a corner of the stone and make a "window" into it.

Yes, we use neodymium magnets because they have a much stronger pull. They can be had in different shapes and sizes, cheaply on ebay.

As far a using a bench grinder, that's okay as long as you take a fine-grit sandpaper to the ground surface after grinding, because the material FROM the grinding wheel tends to get "bonded" to the ground area, and you'll see bright metal that is NOT from your stone. I learned that from my bench grinder.

I hope that answers some of your questions.

Regards, Ben

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Wow Johnno thats a pretty comprehensive list of meteorite books. Some of those are very expensive books though.

I think if your just starting out your best bet is to get The Field Guide To Meteors and Meteorites by Norton-

Field Guide to Meteors and Meteorites

For loupes, like Ben says check eBay-

eBay Jeweler Loupes

For diamond files, I use a small diamond file set that you can get very cheap from Harbor Freight Tools-

Harbor Freight Tools

For Neodymium magnets, I've ordered from this place in the past and I was happy with their magnets and service-

K&J Magnetics

Whatever you do, don't stick them on a bench grinder because it's very easy to ruin them.

This should help get you started. Good luck!

Del

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G'Day Everyone

First off, I'd like to address Fredo, actually it's Freddo the Frog, one of my favorite candies when I was knee high to a grasshopper. Well Freddo, as for being out getting some hard yakka, things have slowed down to a screaming halt. In fact, a good night sleep is a thing of the past. But let's be positive, it's not many more days to go till the end of the year and according to what I read, next year I'm going to be rich, because of Obama .. Yeah!!

But seriously, the book list as I stated when I posted it, is credit to Al Mitterling. He's a great guy on one of the other forums. There was a question on helpful meteorite books and he happened to have posted this list. I tried to find the thread, but it's either old age or I'm just going to too many forums and lost track of alot of things. But besides that, I'd be happy with Freddo. It brings back memories.

Digi, there is alot more than this, but it depends on your preferences. Alot of them are advanced and yes, they are a little expensive. But a hint, check out your used book stores, you could score an absolute bargain. I was going to list alot of other things that you stated in your questions, but I think the great members here have filled in that void. But you must realize there's alot of sites out there that offer photographs of alot of meteorites. I will try and put a list together for you if you want to just go and look. Another area that is very useful is the Met Bull, here you should be able to select a classification and absorb all the information. In fact, to start you off, I'll post this link from our almighty leader Bill Southern

http://tin.er.usgs.gov/meteor/metbull.php?...&code=35339

Most of what you find on this list will give you a photograph. Sometimes a slice, sometimes the main mass; but I think you get my drift.

As for the free dinner, I think you owe that to Al, not me. But I feel two books that contain alot of photographs is the Cambridge Encyclopedia of Meteorites, but there's also alot of scientific information. And the second book if you're looking just for photographs is The Robert Haag Collection of Meteorites. You can search this on the net or go to his site and purchase a copy, but the book basically contains alot of photographs and very little information on the meteorite. But if you're only looking for a visual, it's a pretty cool book. I think it's around 136 pages.

Del, yeah some of the books are expensive and really unique. I have a friend of mine hunting some stores in Europe hoping to find a couple that I have selected.

Anyway, I hope this not only helps out Digi, but many other members on this forum that have a curiosity in regards to meteorites and if any one of you out there have some books that you can add to this list, I really think Al would appreciate it and I will definitely forward your posts and recommendations to him, so his wonderful list can increase.

Well, with that said ..... I need to take flight, have alot more forums to visit before the night's out. Now I feel how Santa feels on Christmas Eve.

Cheers

Johnno

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Hi Digitrich,

Good books? Take your pick, there's a lot of good ones out now. I'm partial to the ones by O. Richard Norton.

Good loupes at cheap prices can be found on ebay. I know, because I've left a few in the field!

As for videos, I'd recommend the ones by Ruben Ortega and Sonny Clary on their respective websites. Also, some nice videos have been made by other forum members including Jayray, Mike, and Paul. Even I have a poor-quality first video that can be seen if you scroll down to the forum topic - recent trip to holbrook. Check it out.

A tile saw is better than no saw but, a rock saw would be better. tile saws have thick blades and tend to waste a lot of material.

If you don't want to cut open your suspect meteorite yet, just take a diamond-file to a corner of the stone and make a "window" into it.

Yes, we use neodymium magnets because they have a much stronger pull. They can be had in different shapes and sizes, cheaply on ebay.

As far a using a bench grinder, that's okay as long as you take a fine-grit sandpaper to the ground surface after grinding, because the material FROM the grinding wheel tends to get "bonded" to the ground area, and you'll see bright metal that is NOT from your stone. I learned that from my bench grinder.

I hope that answers some of your questions.

Regards, Ben

Ben,

Thanks for your response. I don't know what a rock saw is though. I have a chop saw for dry cutting steel rebar or masonry, and a wet tile saw, also the bench grinder. I have maybe 40 or 50 samples to cut or grind. About 15 of which have enough evidence to strongly suggest meteoric, the balance, either aren't or are so weathered that their exterior appearance is misleading. I am considering getting a band saw, my only fear is if I am wrong and I cut what appears to be an iron and it is actually a stony iron, I am assuming I would cook the blade. I am also assuming a rock saw would be for cutting jewelry stones, would that be correct? I wonder if I couldn't just put a thinner blade on one of my existing saws and have it suffice.

Thanks,

Joe

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