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Tell me what you think...


Guest bedrock bob

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Guest bedrock bob

So, take a look and tell me what you think.

This one was an oddball rock in the area and the crust stood out. It was cracked and shiny. The matrix did not look like what I would expect a meteorite to look like.

The crust got my interest up though, and it does attract a magnet slightly. The stone is solid but not especially heavy.

I decided to go ahead and polish up a fresh face on it. By golly, there are some spherical inclusions easily visible. They look just like those chondrule photos to me, but then I don’t know jack about it. There are a few small metal flecks too. Not many.

Now I have a rock that I can’t rule out as a meteorite. I can’t I.D. it either because, as I stated above, I don’t know jack about it. I figured that I would post the darn thing.

http://i335.photobucket.com/albums/m468/bedrockbob/crust.jpg

http://i335.photobucket.com/albums/m468/be...ob/interior.jpg

Bedrock Bob

P.S. - If all else fails I will throw this one in the crapper and write a little story about it.

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From what I have seen and read that would have to be from the moon, mars or earth to be "meteoritical"...the quartz looking rock would likel;y exclude it from any regular type of meteorite. I am sure that the more Learned amongst us can shed more light; ie,Paleface, Ruben and not the leastest-Mr B.

Fred

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Hey Bob and all,

I usually hate to weigh in on this type of subject because the finder - of the rock in question - always seems to get their feelings hurt. So before I start please understand that I mean no disrespect. And as we all know pictures can be deceiving so please understand these are just my impressions of the pics and text sent.

First of all, any rock with nickel iron in it is almost certainly a meteorite. There are a few exceptions but those exceptions would be great finds in their own right! I think in this case what is seen as iron is quite possibly tiny quartz crystals that mimic the look of iron.

If it did have visible iron it would probably be heavy for its size and highly magnetic as opposed to typical earth rocks.

The crust looks way too thick to be fusion crust and in my opinion is not.

The pictures aren’t really good enough to determine whether or not it has chondrules. From what I can see it’s not very convincing to me. However, chondrules are a definitive test for a meteorite. If it does have chondrules it is a meteorite, end of story.

I wouldn’t throw it in the sewer just yet. Wait to have an expert look at it in person then throw it in the crapper.

Ruben Garcia

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Guest bedrock bob
Hey Bob and all,

I usually hate to weigh in on this type of subject because the finder - of the rock in question - always seems to get their feelings hurt. So before I start please understand that I mean no disrespect. And as we all know pictures can be deceiving so please understand these are just my impressions of the pics and text sent.

First of all, any rock with nickel iron in it is almost certainly a meteorite. There are a few exceptions but those exceptions would be great finds in their own right! I think in this case what is seen as iron is quite possibly tiny quartz crystals that mimic the look of iron.

If it did have visible iron it would probably be heavy for its size and highly magnetic as opposed to typical earth rocks.

The crust looks way too thick to be fusion crust and in my opinion is not.

The pictures aren’t really good enough to determine whether or not it has chondrules. From what I can see it’s not very convincing to me. However, chondrules are a definitive test for a meteorite. If it does have chondrules it is a meteorite, end of story.

I wouldn’t throw it in the sewer just yet. Wait to have an expert look at it in person then throw it in the crapper.

Ruben Garcia

Ruben,

You dont have to worry about me getting bent out of shape. I want an opinion and I got it. I posted it more to get feedback on my I.D. methodology rather than the rock itself anyway.

Yes, my first reaction was that it was a basalt with a hematite skin. It is still my opinion but with the crust and the spherical inclusions I figured it would be a great case study for me.

I am superbly fastidious with a 20X hand lens. A by-product of 30 years hardrock mining. There is a thin line of alteration that looks like the crust was baked from the matrix but who knows what came first...the chicken or the egg. There are no quartz crystals that I can see but there are both feldspar crystals and nodules. The metal flakes are definitely metal, but I am not convinced that they are nickel iron. Pretty dark...maybe graphite but in my opinion a base metal. It is definitely a magnetic rock, so there is some Fe in there somewhere. The photos are much more "zoomable" on my computer than they are on the post so there is no way to get a look at the metal, although you can vaguely see some of the many spherical inclusions. Chondrules? Heck I dont know. I have seen a lot of photos of chondrules and read many descriptions, but I have yet to be able to discern a chondrule from an ordinary spherical inclusion which I can locate in many rocks.

I am aware that if this is a meteorite it would be a rare one. Hey, I didnt pick it, it picked me (remember the Fecolite?). It definitely does not look like any meteorite that I have ever seen but you have answered in exactly the way I would want you to... Honestly. Again, without telling me anything you have given me the info that I needed, and I do appreciate your response. You have reinforced what I already know. This is a step in the right direction!

While we are doing this little case study, lets assume that there was a chance that this was a meteorite. What would be my next step in getting a determination? At what level of uncertainty would you cross the line between the potty and the petrologist? Between effluent and expert? Are there those that live on the mountain that would cast their eyes upon such a stone and render an opinion for me? Advise me oh great one.

Bedrock (or Bolide if you wish) Bob

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Hey Bob,

You ask, "Are there those that live on the mountain that would cast their eyes upon such a stone and render an opinion for me? Advise me oh great one."

I don't know anyone in Santa Fe that could help, but there are plenty in Albuquerque at the University that could I.D. such a stone.

If all else fails send it to me - with a S.A.S.E. if you want it back. I'll tell you what I find.

Ruben Garcia

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Guest bedrock bob
Hey Bob,

You ask, "Are there those that live on the mountain that would cast their eyes upon such a stone and render an opinion for me? Advise me oh great one."

I don't know anyone in Santa Fe that could help, but there are plenty in Albuquerque at the University that could I.D. such a stone.

If all else fails send it to me - with a S.A.S.E. if you want it back. I'll tell you what I find.

Ruben Garcia

Thanks Ruben!

I do appreciate the help! I would not want to waste your time with this one, but there will be plenty more and I would love to take a rain check on that offer for some time in the future.

As far as UNM goes, I would love to make contact with someone there. I am in Albuquerque often and it would be an invaluable asset to have a contact there at the Met. Dept. I have thought about walking in and introducing myself, but there would be very little to discuss. If you know of someone there that would be willing to put up with me for a few minutes I would love to get my foot in the door. I would love to bounce a few elementary questions off someone whith experience...maybe even tell me the difference between chondrules and what I see in this specimen! Again, this is for my education and not really about this rock. Even if it was a meteorite it would mean very little if I could not learn something from it.

Hey, you are all right Ruben! I might just change my mind and send you a slice of the Fecolite for your collection!

Bedrock Bob

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Hi Bob,

My two cents worth says that the fusion crust should only be PAPER thin. And there appears to be some light colored silica that may be quartzose in nature. And unless this is very-low nickel/iron, I'm not seeing enough of it. Okay, with my opinion and three dollars, you can get a plain coffee at Starbucks.

Keep on keepin-on, Ben

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Bedrock Bob

P.S. - If all else fails I will throw this one in the crapper and write a little story about it.

________________________________________________________________________________

____

Hi Bob, did I read your quotes right, that you cut a slice of this specimen ??? If so, could you shoot a photo of it to the forum..... :coffeetime:

jim "bones" :outtahere:

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Guest bedrock bob
Hi Bob,

My two cents worth says that the fusion crust should only be PAPER thin. And there appears to be some light colored silica that may be quartzose in nature. And unless this is very-low nickel/iron, I'm not seeing enough of it. Okay, with my opinion and three dollars, you can get a plain coffee at Starbucks.

Keep on keepin-on, Ben

For your opinion I would gladly buy you a coffee at Starbucks! These types of comments are exactly what I wanted. At my level of experience I need to know what is wrong with a "meteor wrong" to know what is right with a meteorite. All the descriptions in the world does me less good than an example that can be discussed, and I do appreciate you all discussing it!

When I look at the specimen I see the crust too thick, but interesting enough to turn the rock over for a second look. It is slightly magnetic so I continue. There are crystals formed, so I think pressure and this is a negative in my mind. The clear crystals and nodules are blue flourescent at 1/4 turn so I am thinking feldspars and not quartz, so I scratch and they are softer than quartz (of course this does not mean there is not quartz there somewhere). I do not see the hex crystal structure of quartz but rather the crystal structure of feldspar. So then I grind it flat and polish a face. I see metal, not much but it is there. Not nickel iron in my opinion. It is slightly darker, less luster, and most probably a base metal considering the spot where I picked it up and the appearance. There are spherical clasts all over the place. Perfectly round, radiating from the center, and of various different compositions. Some are pinkish, some are clear, some are defined and some are altered into the rock slightly. It is here that I am out of my league.

I look at the rock overall and pass judgement. Nope, not a meteorite. BUT... there are enough indicators to spur a discussion like this one, and the worst that could happen is that I learn something. So it is off to the dressing room to prepare for a photo shoot. This little rock will be a star for a day and serve as a learning aid. Hey, got lemons? Make lemonade!

So, I am a much richer man today than yesterday. It has cost nothing but the asking, and this little rock has served it's purpose well. Once again I made out like a bandit! I believe that I will christen this one "Escuela" (Polishite).

Bedrock Bob

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Guest bedrock bob

From my computer here at work I can not view the page. I will try to go there and take a look soon. My resources for the web are very limited!

Similar?

BB

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I look at the rock overall and pass judgement. Nope, not a meteorite.

Bedrock Bob

________________________________________________________________________________

______

Hi Bob, At first look it doesn't look like a meteorite but I wouldn't pass judgment as of yet.

Have you ever seen the TATAHOUINE Meteorite ??? I have 3 in my collection. If it weren't for the fact that it was a witnessed fall, I'm sure it would be passed over as a meteorite. I have crust on two of my pieces, but other than that it looks nothing like a meteorite. :coffeetime:

jim "bones" :outtahere:

http://www.diogenite.com/tata1.htm

http://cgi.ebay.com/TATAHOUINE-Diogenite-2...idZp1638Q2em125

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Bob,

My impression after looking at both photos is that the specimen is not a meteorite, however, an impression is only part of the process. I would totally exhaust all the characteristic questions before I potty canned or submitted the specimen for verification. There are many web sites with meteorite identification information. Here is one that has good suggestions as well as information on submitting your specimen for verification.

http://meteorites.asu.edu/identification/index.htm

Here is another, I think that Ruben did/or may still have some video's on this site.

http://www.star-bits.com/ID.htm

Jim

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Hey Jim, and others,

I still have not had any reply from UCLA on my request to have a stone looked at. I even tried to contact one of the dealers here in CO and no reply, so... Maybe I will send a piece of one of my little collection pieces to the folks there at ASU to see if they would take a look. Only thing is, reading through the instructions on that page, it says you should send something about 1" in size. Heck, none of my little pieces are over 1/4". : ) Maybe they will still take a look. Thanks for posting that link Jim. It may be just what the doctor ordered for me too.

Mike in CO

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Hey Jim, and others,

I still have not had any reply from UCLA on my request to have a stone looked at. I even tried to contact one of the dealers here in CO and no reply, so... Maybe I will send a piece of one of my little collection pieces to the folks there at ASU to see if they would take a look. Only thing is, reading through the instructions on that page, it says you should send something about 1" in size. Heck, none of my little pieces are over 1/4". : ) Maybe they will still take a look. Thanks for posting that link Jim. It may be just what the doctor ordered for me too.

Mike in CO

Mike,

You might try calling ahead to one of the METEORITE TESTING AND CLASSIFYING INSTITUTIONS.

Here is a link that I had stuck in my meteorite information.

http://imca.repetti.net/metinfo/metfind.html

Jim

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