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1/2 man, 1/2 boy


garimpo

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If you read this, you WILL pass it on.

You just won't be able to stop yourself.

The average age of the military man is 19 years.

He is a short haired, tight-muscled kid who,

under normal circumstances, is considered by

society as half man, half boy. Not yet dry behind

the ears, not old enough to buy a beer, but old

enough to die for his country. He never really

cared much for work and he would rather wax

his own car than wash his father's, but he has

never collected unemployment, either.

He's a recent high school graduate; he was probably

an average student, pursued some form of sport

activities, drives a ten year old jalopy, and has a

steady girlfriend that either broke up with him when

he left, or swears to be waiting when he returns from

half a world away. He listens to rock and roll or hip-hop

or rap or jazz or swing - and a 155mm howitzer.

He is 10 or 15 pounds lighter now than when he

was at home because he is working or fighting

from before dawn to well after dusk. He has

trouble spelling, thus letter writing is a pain for him,

but he can field strip a rifle in 30 seconds and

reassemble it in less time - in the dark. He can recite

to you the nomenclature of a machine gun or grenade

launcher and use either one effectively if he must.

He digs foxholes and latrines and can

apply first aid like a professional.

He can march until he is told to stop,

or stop until he is told to march.

He obeys orders instantly and without hesitation,

but he is not without spirit or individual dignity.

He is self-sufficient.

He has two sets of fatigues: he washes one and wears

the other. He keeps his canteens full and his feet dry.

He sometimes forgets to brush his teeth, but never

to clean his rifle. He can cook his own meals, mend

his own clothes, and fix his own hurts.

If you're thirsty, he'll share his water with you; if you

are hungry, his food. He'll even split his ammunition

with you in the midst of battle when you run low.

He has learned to use his hands like weapons

and weapons like they were his hands.

He can save your life - or take it, because that is his job.

He will often do twice the work of a civilian, draw half the pay,

and still find ironic humor in it all.

He has seen more suffering and death than he should have

in his short lifetime.

He has wept in public and in private, for friends

who have fallen in combat, and is unashamed.

He feels every note of the National Anthem vibrate

through his body while at rigid attention, and while

tempering the burning desire to 'square-away' those

around him who haven't bothered to stand,

remove their hat, or even stop talking.

In an odd twist, day in and day out, far from

home, he defends their right to be disrespectful.

Just as did his Father, Grandfather, and Great-

grandfather, he is paying the price for our

freedom. Beardless or not, he is not a boy.

He is the American Fighting Man that has

kept this country free for over 200 years.

He has asked nothing in return, except

our friendship and understanding.

Remember him, always, for he has earned our

respect and admiration with his blood.

And now we even have women over there in

danger, doing their part in this tradition of going

to war when our nation calls us to do so.

As you go to bed tonight, remember this shot. . .

A short lull, a little shade and a picture

of loved ones in their helmets.

Prayer wheel for our military... please don't

break it. Please send this on after a short prayer.

Prayer Wheel

'Lord, hold our troops in your loving hands.

Protect them as they protect us.

Bless them and their families for the selfless acts

they perform for us in our time of need. Amen.'

When you receive this, please stop for a moment

and say a prayer for our ground troops,

sailors on ships, and airmen

in the air in Iraq, Afghanistan

and all foreign countries.

There is nothing attached...

This can be very powerful..

Of all the gifts you could give a US Soldier,

Sailor, Coastguardsman, Marine,

or Airman, prayer is the very best one.

I can't break this one, sorry.

Pass it on to everyone and pray.

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Garimpo, your right, my son-in-law, just came home from a year tour on the DMZ in South Korea, been home 5 days, now Tuesday he leaves for training at FT. Bliss TX, for three months, then on to Afganastan for 12 months, he's a US ARMY SCOUT, Sniper with the 7th Cav. his whole unit is going. Heres his picture and my step daughter. He's just 24, but looks like he's 18. Grubstake

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Good morning Grubby...that's a great pic of your warrior...wish him luck for me...

I guess when you and I were doing "our time" we probably looked that young but I didn't ever

think about being young....to occupied trying to get back alive.....if it were possible I would trade

places with that young man now....think the Army would take our Minelabs in on trade for a

sniper rifle and uniform?....me and you as a sniper team....two "Okies" just out hunting.... :brows:

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Yeh your right, I'd trade places with him in heart beat, Hell I'm sick, old and goning to die year or two anyway, I'd like to have the chance to get me some one shot kills. You should see him dressed up in his Gillie suit, He look down right funny. GrubstakeHis best friend went in with him, there a team, Jack{my son in law} Shoots and he bud spots, but they can both do each others jobs.

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You know, when I went in, I was getting $79.00 a month in Basic training, he went in and was getting somewhere arond $1300.00 in basic, now he's got 14 months in and is getting $1800. and $200.00 overseas pay, which just stoped for the three months of training, when he goes to Afganastan he will get that back+ Combat pay which will make it a extra $700.00 a month. Hell when I was in name we only got 65 bucks extra and I was drawing flight pay which was only an extra $90.00 I think. Hard to remember, its been 42 years since I was there.

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We certainly were not in it for the pay! I think when I went in I was getting a whopping $120 a month! When he gets to Afganistan, I sure would like to have a well used spent brass as a bit of a shelf deco item!

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Yeh your right, I'd trade places with him in heart beat, Hell I'm sick, old and goning to die year or two anyway, I'd like to have the chance to get me some one shot kills. You should see him dressed up in his Gillie suit, He look down right funny. GrubstakeHis best friend went in with him, there a team, Jack{my son in law} Shoots and he bud spots, but they can both do each others jobs.

All sniper teams are two man spotter and shooter but share duties just the same.Your ghilli is your life saver as your rifle is your life taker!Semper Fi!

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Grubby...what caliber are they using?....I'd love to team up with a .50 cal.....

Kruger...morning....what kind of spotter scopes do they use and what info does the scope

read out to them...I guess their not exactly the kind you would find at Academy or

Wal Mart......

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Garimpo, he is trained and qualifide for the 50 cal. Anyway, we put him on a plane this morning for FT. Bliss, he will be there three months for more training, then come back for three weeks at FT, Irwin for desert training. Then to Afganastan, he will be going as a unit, the 2nd of the 7th cav. for 12 months. Grubstake

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Grubby...what caliber are they using?....I'd love to team up with a .50 cal.....

Kruger...morning....what kind of spotter scopes do they use and what info does the scope

read out to them...I guess their not exactly the kind you would find at Academy or

Wal Mart......

Morning' to you Garimp,We used either a Steiner or a Leupold spotter (we were allowed to use our personal choice if we bought it...wanted a Swarovski!)As for a scope the Nightforce 24-50,always a 50 mil.objective......gathers light.The mil dot system is generally standard as well,mine would illuminate.In my opinion I would rather have a gun from Wal-Mart than my scope!

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Garimpo...

Here is what a .50 cal Barret will do to a human body............ for those that are a squeemish do not watch this as human bodies (Taliban/AQ) really come apart and fly.

http://shock.military.com/Shock/videos.do?...yContent=161704

Dont get me wrong the .50 will "throw the juice",but those are not humans in that video......rockchucks.

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Kruger...good info...thanks...I was never trained as a sniper but instead was assigned to a

International Rifle Team (our cover).....what are "rockchucks"?....

No problem Garimpo,just a past chapter in my life.A rockchuck is a small animal ever heard of a marmot??Thats what a rockchuck is,cute little critter,we used to call them watermelons on legs.

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Hey Garimpo,

We've seen a lot of rock chucks in Colorado while four-wheeling anywhere above the tree line. The locals call 'em "whistle pigs". When you get near, they duck down into their burrow but, if you whistle, they pop their heads up out of the hole.

Ben

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