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My July finds


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For you guys and gals that are hold up waiting for the hot weather to subside and the creepy crawlies to go back in their holes, I know your interest in new finds don't wane so here is a pic or two of my latest. Found these small babies up here in ol' Colorado. BTW they are small. Took these pics through the m-scope. I turned them all over in pic 2. There are three that I have had for a while in the picture but there are four I found just two days ago. All of these from a space about 30' square. Now where was that? Rats, forgot already. ttp://www.nuggetshooter.ipbhost.com/style_emoticons/smileone/innocent0009.gif

Anyway, enjoy and best to all.

Mike in CO

nom de plume: Rockbiter

micro hunter of southwest Colorado

<http://i127.photobucket.com/albums/p124/mmurray_02/2008_Sargents1.jpg>

<http://i127.photobucket.com/albums/p124/mmurray_02/2008_Sargents2.jpg>

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Mike, very interesting. I'm curious as to what you think they might be or the kind or rock? Pictures are really hard to tell from, but they are missing some of the key signs for meteorites. Just a guess, but they look like terrestrial rocks, then meteorites. Again this is just a shot in the dark, and my :twocents:, as I'm not even close to being an expert. Maybe you could grind a window, if possible, since I know you stated they were photographed through a m-scope, to see what the inside looks like. The hard edges (very distinct points and lines) give the appearance of terrestrial, than meteoric. Keep us updated...Jason :;):

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Hi Jason

For some reason I can not open Mike's pics. :shrug: Whats up with you?? :hmmmmmm: Are you ready for the season?? :postdigger: We need a hunt to gather some specimens. :icon_mrgreen: Miss your smiling face in the field. With finds!!! :ROFL:

Wayne :icon_mrgreen:

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Wayne,

Just copy paste them into the url and then delete the <> things.

Mike, idk they have alot of marks from clevage, some meteorites show

cleavage from impact but only one or two specemens out of thousands, Idk if

that many could should clevage. Good luck hunting!

[Erik]

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I know, you folks are correct to question these pieces. I certainly understand. I sat here and thought about it and have decided I need to have someone besides myself take a look at them and not just in pictures. I sent an email to Prof Wasson at UCLA but haven't heard back yet. If he doesn't respond in a day or so, I will try to contact him again. If I can get in touch with him, I will see if he would take a look at them and the pieces that I had sent to the U of A that were determined to be native iron. Might just as well so that I can get a little credence to what I tell people about these pieces. If UCLA is not interested, I will try elsewhere. Until then, I will just consider them "suspect" stones.

Best to all,

Mike in CO

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  • 3 months later...

Pardon me for resurrecting this older thread but I have an update on what I had posted before. I finally had Dr. Wasson at UCLA respond to one of my emails. He first suggested I send a sample of my suspect irons. But when I made a point to tell him how small they are, he gave me the we're too busy reply. I certainly understand him saying that. I would imagine they are too busy for small stuff like I have. I'm not disappointed but am feeling a bit challenged now to find someone else (with credentials) that will take a look at a couple of the pieces I have.

If I am correct in my evaluations, I have close to 30 small irons and probably a 1/2 dozen or more small stonys at this time. Even though they are tiny, I figure it would be a shame to have found them and not have someone confirm that they actually are meteorites. The irons that is at least. Seems like it wouldn't take much more than a quick look for someone to say that they are or are not pieces of irons.

On the pieces of native iron that I had previously sent to Dr. Costin at U of A, I mentioned them to Dr. Wasson and his reply was to the effect that U of A should be able to

do the same test that he can for nickel. So that request didn't get far either. Oh well.

I know, enough with the whining already.

If anyone on the forum has a suggestion for another lab to try, it would be welcome.

Mike in CO

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Mike; the magazine, Metorite, August 2007 volume 13, #3 has an article by Mathias Lefort

mathias.lafort@wanadoo.fr

the article is about micro meteorites, perhaps he would be a good resource.

Also, you may be able to buy a copy of this issue to read for yourself....

good luck

Fred

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Yes I believe some time back I exchanged emails with him. I wanted to let him know I thought his article was very good. Anyway, yes he does hunt micro size but when he says micro he means very small. When I say I am hunting micros, I mean sizes like less than 1/2" . I know, not the true meaning of the word.

Mike

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Ok, Mike; first thing would be to use words correctly for clear understanding...

Second thing the number of "irons" you have argues against them all being meteorites because irons comprise a very small percentage of falls...despite being found in higher percentages...unless you have happened upon a strewn field of very small irons...

Third, if they are nearly a 1/2 inch you could streak-test them and then window them (the stones) and you could test them for nickel...

The Gold Basin Strewn field has only produced a few irons and the area has seen hundreds or thousands of detector hours from end to end...I think 30 irons is highly unlikely from my recollection of where you are...?

Paleface has posted many links to aid identification have you done your homework?

I love the seach as you seem to; keep trying and good luck.

Fred

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I know my use of the word micro is not exactly correct but at least to me it is in this respect... My specimens are small enough that in order to see the detail properly requires magnification. Not just 10x but in some cases 30 to 70x. Microscope - micro, hopefully you can see my connection.

I contacted a lady at Cascadia today. She was very kind to respond right away but she suggested I try U of A first. I will do that next. The saga continues.

I'm amazed at how difficult it can be to get certification of small specimens. In meteorites, size matters, eh?

thanks for the response.

Mike in Co

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