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Yo All...Well, I was hoping the scream in my Black Widows was going to be another nice nugget, but no...However, the find may be even cooler...Yesterday I was working my newest patch (which seems to be turning out a "One Nugget Patch"), beeping the bench area carefully, when I got a ear splitting scream... :headphones: ...Back up in a bush, next to an old header pile was the awesome hand forged pick...I am convinced that this wash was last worked in the times around when Henry Wickenburg (and/or his assigns) had the Vulture Mine up and running....Nothing but old square nails, and now these two beauties...But, notice the mark on the pick head....a definite "V" which I believe can only have come from the Vulture Mine blacksmith shop...I found the axehead today also in a header pile...I think these tools are from around the 1870's or so...And the guys who swung them didn't leave much gold behind...As I have explored this patch area more, I've learned that they ripped up the top foot or two of bedrock, all by hand, I'm sure...So, it ain't gold, but it's sorta like not gettin' the skunk :icon_mrgreen: ...Cheers, Unc

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maybe not worth its weight in gold but a very cool find indeed. awsome to find a relic wich at that time was probably his state of the art goldfinder. vulture blacksmith was their minelab :laught16: good job unc. diggitdawg

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Hey Ron,

Very nice finds.

Awhile back I found one exactly like that one, in a spot between here and the Wick... where I have taken quite a few nuggets from and it was in A-1 condition, except for a bit of rust scale.

Good hunting.

Bob T.

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Nice find on the tools,and it is possible they

were property of the Vulture mine at one time.

Neither one is hand forged though. The pick

has been drawn and re pointed. That is a very

common way to sharpen picks ,drills,and bars.

Factory made picks and axes from cast steel

were common from the 1830's.

I bet if you check a little closer under the rust,

you will find the makers logo.

Can't believe the owners of the Vulture would

waste a blacksmiths time building wrought iron

picks. He probably had a full time job just

keeping them sharp along with all the drills and

other stuff. :twocents:

At any rate both are neat finds.

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I'd like to add this into the mix of things.....do a Google search on "cleaning finds"! I don't always subscribe to the "cleaning element" aspect of old finds, yet with some items it may be beneficial in finding out origins.

Gary

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Ron,Greg,....believe that drifting pick is a later vintage as it has a narrow eyelet.The earlier one's were much heavier with a large round eye.Always nice to find that stuff..........Dave

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Uncle Ron

Nice pick and ax head. In a hundred years or less some one may find the 1/2 dozen picks that I have lost. :angry-smiley-010: I found several ax heads of that vintage that you have there, up in Walker Az. One of the ax heads was pounded on the back end so much that the hole for the handle was mashed and cracked. Led me to believe it was used as a wedge for busting bedrock. I found it in a trench that was following a vein on the hillside. See if the back end of your ax head has been beat real hard.

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Dave

The Vulture Mine operated up until 1942 under

various owners. That is why I said the tools could

belonged to them at one time.

Highgrading was a huge problem there,so some

of their tools could have walked away too. I agree

the pick is a later make,but not that late. You can

still buy a new axe like the one in the picture. But

they have made the same style forever.

Just like now picks were made in several styles

and shapes. A lot of the old picks used in the Colorado

mines had short heads and straighter with a pointed

plate coming back from the eye on each side of the

handle. They had a different eye,more like an axe,

and were made to twist sideways to finish a break,

and pry rocks loose.

I have seen the type like you mentioned. Most of

those were packed along from the farm,or pilfered

from the railroad. Long pick heads are OK in a creek

bed,but they suck underground or in hard rock. :laught16:

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I leave stuff like that behind when I find it--I don't want to lug around old dirty rusty stuff when I'm beepin :tisc-tisc: maybe I left those 2 items there as well :innocent0009: -Mike C... :ph34r2:

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